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Has anyone seen the published valve lift and duration figures for the stock camshafts installed in the 2017 Escape 2.0?
 

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2019 Honda Ridgeline RTL-E AWD
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If anyone has a Ford WSM for the 2017 twin-scroll they can look-up the lift specs in section 303-01B 2.0 Engine Specifications under Camshaft. For my '14 single-scroll it's:
Lobe lift - intake = 0.327 in / 8.3 mm
Lobe lift - exhaust = 0.291 in / 7.4 mm

Duration specs are not listed, at least in my Ford WSM.

As always, anyone can access the WSM for their specific Escape, see item 1.b. in this Forum DIY Section sticky post: Workshop / Service Manual Sources ;)

Though Ford Ti-VCT doesn't change the lift or duration fixed by the cam profile (ours are direct acting so there's no rocker-arm ratio in-play), remember it does alter the overlap between intake and exhaust by altering the initial timing of each cam independently. AFAIK it's not intended to affect 'effective duration' but I suppose that when the cam timing changes that does have an instant effect on duration of one or more valves depending on the specific lobe position. I read somewhere that the VCT response time is on the order of 0.2 seconds, if true that would probably not be quick enough to be used for continuous effective valve duration management (oooh man, that'd be a complex logic control algorithm!).

All combined it makes the modification /swapping of cams a much more complex undertaking than with 'traditional' valve trains, and many of the 'traditional rules of thumb' about lift and especially duration are somewhat moot given the variable overlap.

Some racing-builds of Ford Ti-VCT engines that are focused mainly on WOT power choose to 'peg' or eliminate the cam phasers (with attendant ECM reprogramming) to effectively eliminate the VCT, essentially reverting the valve train to a 'traditional' configuration.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
In the case of this engine--the valve lift and cam lobe lift is the same--isn't it?
 

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Yes, for all practical intents.

The cam lobe operates directly on the solid valve lifters + shims so the lobe-lift:valve-lift ratio is 1:1 (unlike a cam acting through a rocker arm which may have a different ratio).

If you want to get to the Nth .... subtract the nominal valve clearance from the lobe lift to get valve lift:
intake = 0.0095" / 0.25mm
exhaust= 0.0142" / 0.36mm

Again, I'm referencing specs for a '14 single scroll engine .... the specs might be slightly different for your later 'twin scroll' engine. The valve train design is the same for both.

It doesn't matter but I'm curious, what's your interest?
 

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I can tell you the installed centerlines, but Id have to look it up at work to see what the duration's are. I do know the ramp rates are about 96° and the centerlines are Intake 129°/104° Exhaust - Measurements recorded off of cam lobe NOT valve or bucket.
 

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I can tell you the installed centerlines, but Id have to look it up at work to see what the duration's are. I do know the ramp rates are about 96° and the centerlines are Intake 129°/104° Exhaust - Measurements recorded off of cam lobe NOT valve or bucket.
So in the case of our Ti-VCT engines with separate intake/exhaust cams, the "installed centerline degree" is the relationship of the intake vs exhaust cam centerlines with the phasers (sprocket assembly) in some particular 'installation position', is that correct?

In operation (distinct from "installation") the intake/exhaust cam centerline degrees varies due to the VCT action on each individual cam (i.e. the overlap can vary, unlike on a single-cam design where the intake/exhaust CL degree is 'fixed'), is that correct?

Noting that the camshaft PNs differ between '14 and '17 .... do you know if the cam profile differs between the older single-scroll and the newer twin-scroll 2.0s? Are there different cam profiles for different applications of each of the 'generations' of 2.0s (e.g. '14 2.0 in an Escape vs in a Focus, or for different applications of the later twin-scroll motor)?

Two tangent questions but trying to capitalize on / learn from your 'insider' experience ....
  • Absent some sort of other trauma, have you encountered a need to actually adjust the valve clearances (change the shims/tappets) on an Escape 2.0? If yes, were those very high mileage engines or ....?
  • Absent some sort of other trauma, have you encountered a need to adjust the Balance Shaft backlash on an Escape 2.0?

All just 'academic curiosity' for me.

Thanks for your contributions to the forum!
 

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So in the case of our Ti-VCT engines, the "installed centerline degree" is the relationship of the cam centerline to the index cylinder TDC with the phasers (sprocket assembly) in some particular 'installation position', is that correct?
Yes at TDC and no, the phaser's themselves have movement of about +\- 4° on the camshaft dowel pin.

In operation (distinct from "installation") the cam centerline degrees varies relative to the index cylinder TDC due to the VCT action, correct?
Yes, when the engine is running, the oil pressure and the control solenoids activating them, control the degree of variable cam timing they receive.

Noting that the camshaft PNs differ between '14 and '17 .... do you know if the cam profile differs between the older single-scroll and the newer twin-scroll 2.0s? Are there different cam profiles for different applications of each of the 'generations' of 2.0s (e.g. '14 2.0 in an Escape vs in a Focus, or for different applications of the later twin-scroll motor)?
Yes, the newer design engines have a different installed centerline, but then again, all the newer engines are 2.3L, unless you purchase a Ford Racing engine, all the 2.0L Turbo cam specs are the same from what i understand. The non turbo 2.0L / 2.3L engines have different centerlines.

Two tangent questions but trying to capitalize on / learn from your 'insider' experience ....
Absent some sort of other trauma, have you encountered a need to actually adjust the valve clearances (change the shims/tappets) on an Escape 2.0? If yes, were those very high mileage engines or ....?
Absent some sort of other trauma, have you encountered a need to adjust the Balance Shaft backlash on an Escape 2.0?
Changing the shims are only ever really necessary if you change cams, or do any valve work as this would change tip heights. From what I've seen, they really do not wear much, if at all unless there's some catastrophic engine failure that sends debris through the engine causing damage to the buckets or lack of lubrication. Haven't ever encountered a need to reset balance shaft backlash. Unless of course you replace the crankshaft or balance shaft.
 
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^ Thank you, sir!

To clarify, by 'older vs newer' I'm referring to the 'single-scroll' vs 'twin-scroll' versions of the 2.0 only, not the 2.3. Understanding that the 'scroll' refers only to the turbo itself but also have the understanding that there were some other internal engine differences coincident with that upgrade while the engine displacement remained the same.

Glad to hear that valve adjustment and balance shaft adjustment should be a non-concern for our well-maintained 2.0's. I figured that was the case but good to hear it from you who works on a lot of them!
 

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What i meant by the old vs newer engines is that I think the 2.0L (older) is being phased out for the 2.3L, not sure what year the cutoff is though. The 2.3L and 2.0L are very similarly built. Internally yes they are different as far as parts that go into them, but i don't know that i can comment on specifics due to the nature of the prototype environment i work in. Everything we are working on now is 2020 / 2021 year configurations.
 
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^ Looking forward to the fruits of your labor ;) :)
 

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Yes at TDC and no, the phaser's themselves have movement of about +\- 4° on the camshaft dowel pin.



Yes, when the engine is running, the oil pressure and the control solenoids activating them, control the degree of variable cam timing they receive.



Yes, the newer design engines have a different installed centerline, but then again, all the newer engines are 2.3L, unless you purchase a Ford Racing engine, all the 2.0L Turbo cam specs are the same from what i understand. The non turbo 2.0L / 2.3L engines have different centerlines.



Changing the shims are only ever really necessary if you change cams, or do any valve work as this would change tip heights. From what I've seen, they really do not wear much, if at all unless there's some catastrophic engine failure that sends debris through the engine causing damage to the buckets or lack of lubrication. Haven't ever encountered a need to reset balance shaft backlash. Unless of course you replace the crankshaft or balance shaft.
So being I replaced new valves and pistons would you say that I will have to adjust the valve's considering that my 2.0 will not crank over by hand once the head was put on and it was set to TDC
 

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Welcome to the forum.

I'm not a mechanic, but I wouldn't expect the variable valve timing being slightly out would prevent the engine being turned over. It sounds like you need to recheck the alignment of all the markers on the cams and crankshaft to ensure they were aligned properly when the timing chain was installed.
 
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