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Well, huh. Does anyone know if the 17S09 recall affects all 2014 Escapes?

It says: "Affected vehicles equipped with 1.6-liter GTDI engines include: 2014 Escape – Louisville Assembly Plant, Feb. 12, 2013 to Sept. 2, 2014". Mine has a build date of 04/2014, but when I put in my VIN, the recall doesn't come up. I called my local dealership and they said they don't see the recall associated with my VIN (either outstanding or completed).

Seems weird that some VINs would be excluded, especially given the wide span of build dates and the fact that mine is smack in the middle of them. Anyone ever experienced that?
 

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I get the oil changed every 10k miles or so

*I have an asterisk because I have a related side question: what coolant does the 1.6 take? I had some yellow (or neon greenish-yellow) Prestone that I used to top it off (not being able to see the coolant the first time) and then this morning I noticed it was orange-ish...which I thought would not be good, as you're not supposed to mix that with yellow-green (even if it says safe for all years and makes), right?
As you will find in the owners manual, Ford recommends oil changes at 7,500 miles. The Works is a great deal at Ford dealers and I have it done every 5,000 miles.

As you will find in the owners manual, the 1.6L uses the ORANGE coolant, Motorcraft VC-3DIL-B (prediluted) and my local dealer has the best price. Mixing coolant types is not an option - time for a flush.
 

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As you will find in the owners manual, Ford recommends oil changes at 7,500 miles. The Works is a great deal at Ford dealers and I have it done every 5,000 miles.

As you will find in the owners manual, the 1.6L uses the ORANGE coolant, Motorcraft VC-3DIL-B (prediluted) and my local dealer has the best price. Mixing coolant types is not an option - time for a flush.
Eh, I'm not really concerned about how often Ford says to change the oil. I've been down this road and 10k with a quality full synthetic (Pennzoil Ultra Platinum is my go-to), decent filter (I actually like the Motorcraft one), and a solid 50/50 mix of highway and city driving is perfectly reasonable. The Works is certainly fine if you don't feel comfortable taking your car anywhere but a dealer, but it's cheaper (and for better components, no less) and faster to go through my usual mechanic (who is also right around the corner rather than across town).

Good to know about the coolant; thank you. I will admit that I didn't know it was running Dex-Cool. While I won't even consider paying the ridiculous premium that the pre-diluted Motorcraft commands, I'll make sure that after the flush it's filled with the Prestone (which makes the Motorcraft stuff, IIRC) since it's half the cost for undiluted (and so more like 1/4 of the cost for the same thing).

Of course, all of that has no bearing whatsoever on the issue I posted about, as the missing coolant happened before I ever added anything.
 

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I've had my 2013 Escape 1.6L EcoBoost since Feb 2013. When getting oil changes, the dealer would say oh we put a little coolant in. As if it was nothing. Now when I run the heat, my low coolant lights comes on. I have no issues during the summer ac usage. Are you one here dealing oe have dealt with this issue or could help me figure out the problem?
 

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I've had my 2013 Escape 1.6L EcoBoost since Feb 2013. When getting oil changes, the dealer would say oh we put a little coolant in. As if it was nothing. Now when I run the heat, my low coolant lights comes on. I have no issues during the summer ac usage. Are you one here dealing oe have dealt with this issue or could help me figure out the problem?
I merged your thread with this existing thread on the same topic. Have a look at the other posts for some help with this. Also, if you do a search, you will see multiple threads on tue same issue.
 

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I've had my 2013 Escape 1.6L EcoBoost since Feb 2013. When getting oil changes, the dealer would say oh we put a little coolant in. As if it was nothing. Now when I run the heater, my low coolant lights comes on. I have no issues during the summer ac usage. Are any one here dealing or have dealt with this issue or could help me figure out the problem?
 

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My 2017 Escape was going through coolant after many visits it was determined it was leaking into the engine. Ford had to replace the entire short block.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I've had my 2013 Escape 1.6L EcoBoost since Feb 2013. When getting oil changes, the dealer would say oh we put a little coolant in. As if it was nothing. Now when I run the heat, my low coolant lights comes on. I have no issues during the summer ac usage. Are you one here dealing oe have dealt with this issue or could help me figure out the problem?
I have no idea but here are some ideas from reading older posts:
heater core leaking, air in the system, a defective heater bypass valve, heater hose to coolant solenoid leaking.
Is there a Diagnostic Trouble Code when you get the low coolant light?
 

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I've had my 2013 Escape 1.6L EcoBoost since Feb 2013. When getting oil changes, the dealer would say oh we put a little coolant in. As if it was nothing. Now when I run the heater, my low coolant lights comes on. I have no issues during the summer ac usage. Are any one here dealing or have dealt with this issue or could help me figure out the problem?
Was your 2013 in the group that had the engine cooling recall?
 

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I have had my 2013 Ford Escape for 2 months. I have had several problems with it, the biggest one being the coolant leak. I have had it in the shop twice already but since my CNA extended warranty has left me with nothing but big diagnostic bills that didnt fix anything any no one being able to find the leak I decided to find it myself.

Diagnosing:
I began by putting a tarp on the ground and covering the tarp with a sack of bread flour. I parked the escape on top of the tarp and waited. This part is a pain to do, but to find and confirm the leak you need to do it. Park on it every day making sure the tarp has flour on it, and note 2 things. The level of coolant you have, AND THE LOWEST AMBIENT AIR TEMPERATURE from the time you parked on the tarp to the next time you drive it.

Discovery:
The mystery is that the leak only happens sometimes, and as it turns out, it will leak on nights or days when it is cold outside. There are 2 copper crush washers that connect the coolant lines to the turbo. There is also an oil line. Ignore the oil line, and focus only on the coolant lines. When the vehicle is driven and the engine is hot, there is pressure in the cooling system. The turbo and exhaust cools faster than the engine does, and therefore some pressure stays in the cooling system for several hours. However the engineers never considered that an aluminum fitting connected to an aluminum body with copper sandwiched in between them would cause a leak. The copper does not expand as much as aluminum when its heated, so while the aluminum fitting stays warm and expanded the copper shrinks down, leaving a small gap in the fitting and coolant drips out. You will see the drips on the tarp the next day, and the bread flour will be stained orange (or whatever color the coolant is).

Fix:
My first fix option is to re-torque the fitting and see if that takes care of it. If it does not I am going to machine fittings on my lathe that will screw in there and replace the crappy fitting system that Ford has on there. I went through this same thing with a 1967 Triumph, but it was on the oil lines, not coolant. I was never able to get that to stop leaking, but I have more/.better tools now than I did then.

Summary:
Thats why you only lose coolant sometimes, and that's why a shop can never find it. Because they wont go crawl under your car and look for an active leak when its 30 outside.. They pull it in the garage where it will never happen because the garage is kept at ~75 degrees all the time. Chances are it will also NOT leak if the engine is running and the car is actively being driven. This is certainly not the cause of all coolant leaks, but I bet money it explains the mystery coolant leak on 80% of the mystery leaks that cant be found. You can confirm it by finding the stained flour on the tarp and then getting under the vehicle, behind the engine near the firewall. There will be coolant on the lines coming out of the turbo. If you drive it the coolant will quickly burn off and leave little evidence behind except for that elusive coolant burning smell.

I hope this helps some of you with this problem!

Here is a link to the ford parts site showing the washers piping and fittings:

Also, if you have an extended warranty that does not cover hoses, these parts will probably also not be covered nor will the repair, because if its round and has a hole through it it is a 'hose'.
 

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I have had my 2013 Ford Escape for 2 months. I have had several problems with it, the biggest one being the coolant leak. I have had it in the shop twice already but since my CNA extended warranty has left me with nothing but big diagnostic bills that didnt fix anything any no one being able to find the leak I decided to find it myself.

Diagnosing:
I began by putting a tarp on the ground and covering the tarp with a sack of bread flour. I parked the escape on top of the tarp and waited. This part is a pain to do, but to find and confirm the leak you need to do it. Park on it every day making sure the tarp has flour on it, and note 2 things. The level of coolant you have, AND THE LOWEST AMBIENT AIR TEMPERATURE from the time you parked on the tarp to the next time you drive it.

Discovery:
The mystery is that the leak only happens sometimes, and as it turns out, it will leak on nights or days when it is cold outside. There are 2 copper crush washers that connect the coolant lines to the turbo. There is also an oil line. Ignore the oil line, and focus only on the coolant lines. When the vehicle is driven and the engine is hot, there is pressure in the cooling system. The turbo and exhaust cools faster than the engine does, and therefore some pressure stays in the cooling system for several hours. However the engineers never considered that an aluminum fitting connected to an aluminum body with copper sandwiched in between them would cause a leak. The copper does not expand as much as aluminum when its heated, so while the aluminum fitting stays warm and expanded the copper shrinks down, leaving a small gap in the fitting and coolant drips out. You will see the drips on the tarp the next day, and the bread flour will be stained orange (or whatever color the coolant is).

Fix:
My first fix option is to re-torque the fitting and see if that takes care of it. If it does not I am going to machine fittings on my lathe that will screw in there and replace the crappy fitting system that Ford has on there. I went through this same thing with a 1967 Triumph, but it was on the oil lines, not coolant. I was never able to get that to stop leaking, but I have more/.better tools now than I did then.

Summary:
Thats why you only lose coolant sometimes, and that's why a shop can never find it. Because they wont go crawl under your car and look for an active leak when its 30 outside.. They pull it in the garage where it will never happen because the garage is kept at ~75 degrees all the time. Chances are it will also NOT leak if the engine is running and the car is actively being driven. This is certainly not the cause of all coolant leaks, but I bet money it explains the mystery coolant leak on 80% of the mystery leaks that cant be found. You can confirm it by finding the stained flour on the tarp and then getting under the vehicle, behind the engine near the firewall. There will be coolant on the lines coming out of the turbo. If you drive it the coolant will quickly burn off and leave little evidence behind except for that elusive coolant burning smell.

I hope this helps some of you with this problem!

Here is a link to the ford parts site showing the washers piping and fittings:

Also, if you have an extended warranty that does not cover hoses, these parts will probably also not be covered nor will the repair, because if its round and has a hole through it it is a 'hose'.
Thanks for the detailed information. I've found in this colder weather antifreeze in the center of the car. I'll have someone check this out for.
Thanks,
ROSHITA
 

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I have had my 2013 Ford Escape for 2 months. I have had several problems with it, the biggest one being the coolant leak. I have had it in the shop twice already but since my CNA extended warranty has left me with nothing but big diagnostic bills that didnt fix anything any no one being able to find the leak I decided to find it myself.

Diagnosing:
I began by putting a tarp on the ground and covering the tarp with a sack of bread flour. I parked the escape on top of the tarp and waited. This part is a pain to do, but to find and confirm the leak you need to do it. Park on it every day making sure the tarp has flour on it, and note 2 things. The level of coolant you have, AND THE LOWEST AMBIENT AIR TEMPERATURE from the time you parked on the tarp to the next time you drive it.

Discovery:
The mystery is that the leak only happens sometimes, and as it turns out, it will leak on nights or days when it is cold outside. There are 2 copper crush washers that connect the coolant lines to the turbo. There is also an oil line. Ignore the oil line, and focus only on the coolant lines. When the vehicle is driven and the engine is hot, there is pressure in the cooling system. The turbo and exhaust cools faster than the engine does, and therefore some pressure stays in the cooling system for several hours. However the engineers never considered that an aluminum fitting connected to an aluminum body with copper sandwiched in between them would cause a leak. The copper does not expand as much as aluminum when its heated, so while the aluminum fitting stays warm and expanded the copper shrinks down, leaving a small gap in the fitting and coolant drips out. You will see the drips on the tarp the next day, and the bread flour will be stained orange (or whatever color the coolant is).

Fix:
My first fix option is to re-torque the fitting and see if that takes care of it. If it does not I am going to machine fittings on my lathe that will screw in there and replace the crappy fitting system that Ford has on there. I went through this same thing with a 1967 Triumph, but it was on the oil lines, not coolant. I was never able to get that to stop leaking, but I have more/.better tools now than I did then.

Summary:
Thats why you only lose coolant sometimes, and that's why a shop can never find it. Because they wont go crawl under your car and look for an active leak when its 30 outside.. They pull it in the garage where it will never happen because the garage is kept at ~75 degrees all the time. Chances are it will also NOT leak if the engine is running and the car is actively being driven. This is certainly not the cause of all coolant leaks, but I bet money it explains the mystery coolant leak on 80% of the mystery leaks that cant be found. You can confirm it by finding the stained flour on the tarp and then getting under the vehicle, behind the engine near the firewall. There will be coolant on the lines coming out of the turbo. If you drive it the coolant will quickly burn off and leave little evidence behind except for that elusive coolant burning smell.

I hope this helps some of you with this problem!

Here is a link to the ford parts site showing the washers piping and fittings:

Also, if you have an extended warranty that does not cover hoses, these parts will probably also not be covered nor will the repair, because if its round and has a hole through it it is a 'hose'.
Interesting diagnosis. How fast were you losing coolant? I've been losing approx. an ounce per month since mine was new. It's been in the shop three times, and no one finds anything wrong/passes every test they put on it. Colder weather seems to play a role in mine as well.
 

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Interesting diagnosis. How fast were you losing coolant? I've been losing approx. an ounce per month since mine was new. It's been in the shop three times, and no one finds anything wrong/passes every test they put on it. Colder weather seems to play a role in mine as well.
I haven't measured over time. In the winter months (November - February or March) I would use 3/4 of a gallon of antifreeze.
 

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The amount i lose is dependent on the speed the temperature changes. I lost 12 ounces over night a few weeks ago when the temperature went from 70* that day to 14* that night and the next day didnt get above 29*. Then when it was driven (after topping it off again to the max line) it did not drop in the first hour after being shut off, but in the next 4 hours it dropped from the max line to the min line.

I have went back to the shop described all this 3 times, they cannot find a leak. It is there, and Im 99% sure i know why. I have seen this before on other things.

Also I dont think a dye test will show much even if it does leak. I do not think it will leak while its being driven. The shape of the drops I saw on my fitting were just a dot. Unless they are looking for a dot about 1/4 the size of a dime they wont see it. If it would leak while driving it would splash and splatter all under the vehicle, but as far as I can tell mine has never leaked while driving.
 

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The amount i lose is dependent on the speed the temperature changes. I lost 12 ounces over night a few weeks ago when the temperature went from 70* that day to 14* that night and the next day didnt get above 29*. Then when it was driven (after topping it off again to the max line) it did not drop in the first hour after being shut off, but in the next 4 hours it dropped from the max line to the min line.

I have went back to the shop described all this 3 times, they cannot find a leak. It is there, and Im 99% sure i know why. I have seen this before on other things.
Why?
 

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Why have they not found the leak?
I assume because an old guy that spent his youth working on cars is no match for a Ford trained technician. Since they know better they don't look at it.
If you can get a shop to do it, I think this will recreate the leak. This is how I found a leak on an identically sealed oil line decades ago.
1. Run the engine until it is at operating temp.
2. Shut the engine off.
3. Use compressed air to blow on the suspected fitting. Just a good stiff breeze of cold air.

You should see a leak develop after a few minutes. The chances of getting a shop to think that far outside the box is slim at best. I'm still trying to figure out at exactly what temperature it has to be to get it too leak. Compressed air may not cool it fast enough. This test is just a theory based on passed experience.

After I re-torque my banjo bolts I will post back and let you guys know if it has resolved the leak or not. My hope now is that the previous owner didn't run it out of coolant and severely overheat it ruining the heads as well.
 

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duke594,

I want to take a look at your customer service case and see what's going on with your Escape. Will you please PM me your VIN or case number?

Thanks!

Ashley
I have. 2013 escape that is just out of the recall date but having same issues with coolant leak. Is this a dealer only fix?
 

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I have. 2013 escape that is just out of the recall date but having same issues with coolant leak. Is this a dealer only fix?
I wanted to let you know that the person you are quoting will not respond to your question. Ford Service no longer monitors this site.
 

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dive

I have to agree with your feelings in post # 44,

this recall of the bad 12.000? is a band aid fix.as it fails to address the head issue. what happens to these cars where it becomes the owners problem post power train warranty at how much of a cost?

on mine, the engine could well have a cracked head since we smell the antifreeze when it is good and hot after about a 1/2 hour or more of running and needs to be toped off weekly. my resale value is down the tubes. I already checked that, the 1.6 is a unwanted trade to anything else. even with the transferable 75k warranty ford gave us after the 21 day you can't drive it recall.

come on ford fix them right or buy them all back and regain your position
I have a 2013 Ford Escape, no problems that I was aware of~ I take it to Ford regularly for The Works. I haven’t a clue if they had to fill the coolant every time. On a cold day last week, I auto started my car to warm up-when I went out, it had shut off. I started it up & the gauge was past the H- it said something like shut off & pull over safely. My husband checked the Coolant-said there was very little in it. Took it to Ford since the Check Engine light was on. They say it has a cracked head/block (I know nothing about cars) and want close to $6000 to get it back on the road. It has 70,000 miles & has been well maintained by Ford. I researched & found many recalls for this ~ my VIN is NOT one of them. This is my second Ford Escape, if Ford/my dealership doesn’t step up, it will be my last. Where do I go from here? How can I get someone to listen? There is no logical reason why this happened ~ I don’t know what to do~ I doubt the car is worth that much. Especially after reading all the complaints, problems & recalls. Any suggestions?
 
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