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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had both rear wheel bearings replaced 18 months and 20,000 miles ago. I now have 99,000 miles on the car. At the time Ford could not source the parts due to COVID and supply chain issues. I had an Indy in a different state install two MOOG rear hub assembly bearings. Now one is bad. What’s the deal with this issue?
 

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Persian Green 2020 Escape Ti Hybrid
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Ok, so you had both rear replaced at 79k and now one of the "new" ones has gone bad after 20k.
Bearings fail, it happens more so in some climates than others and you need to remember Ford only warrantied that part when the car was new for 3/36k and Ford OEM replacements for 2/24k.
Which side has failed this time?
What exactly is the symptom?
This can be as simple as a bearing failing after installation, which does happen.
In general MOOG is a good brand that meets OEM specs so this may be something as little as the snap ring breaking and the bearing separating.
 

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Ok, that could be a bearing, frozen caliper, bent/loose brake shield or a failed brake pad.
The only way to find out is to get the wheel off the ground, do a shake test and then pull it off to see what kind of shape the other components are in.
 

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A bearing is no better than the installer!!! I see so many videos of people using an impact to tighten axle nuts or hammers to install a bearing. One hit in the wrong spot and the bearing will be damaged. It won't show up immediately but its ruined. Same with an impact it shortens the life, it makes a very small flat spot on the bearing which will cause future early failure. You also have to be cautious what part of the bearing you press on. you have to press on the part that has the interference fit.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ok, that could be a bearing, frozen caliper, bent/loose brake shield or a failed brake pad.
The only way to find out is to get the wheel off the ground, do a shake test and then pull it off to see what kind of shape the other components are in.
Great thoughts - thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
A bearing is no better than the installer!!! I see so many videos of people using an impact to tighten axle nuts or hammers to install a bearing. One hit in the wrong spot and the bearing will be damaged. It won't show up immediately but its ruined. Same with an impact it shortens the life, it makes a very small flat spot on the bearing which will cause future early failure. You also have to be cautious what part of the bearing you press on. you have to press on the part that has the interference fit.
I don’t think this could be an issue since the Ford Escape bearings don’t get pressed in since it is all one unit with the hub.
 

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How was the axle nut installed??? Impact or tightened and torqued down manually??? In my 50years in service, I have seen so many pinion seal replacements lead to a pinion bearing failure in a short time do to the technician relying on his trusty impact wrench rather Than taking 5 minutes to grab the holding tool and tighten it with a ratchet. Can you get away with using an impact??? yes many times and again somewhat an operators feel, but sooner or later it will catch up.
a second point is Someone pressed that bearing into that hub, it could have been damaged then the bearing could have been damaged in manufacturing or even took a major fall during transportation, thus the warranty on the new part. There is also a wide range of bearing and hub price and quality in the aftermarket. These can all be contributing factors to failure.
 
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