2013+ Ford Escape Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,338 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So, I'm in Independence, Iowa, at the moment on a job. Family is holding down the fort back home.

I did a marathon 996 miles to get here from my home and I drove it in a single day. It was 17.5 hours from the time I left the driveway to the time I parked at the hotel. I pushed it speed-wise as much as I could trusting my Uniden R3 (which is awesome, by the way) and attentiveness to avoid tickets. I am not condoning this, it's just what I did.


  • So first, comfort: After all that time in the car, my 62 year old frame emerged without a single ache or pain. I was comfortable the whole way out. I tuned my seat position over the first 2500 miles or so I've driven it prior to this trip and it paid off. I'm very happy to drive this car all day long.
  • Next, mileage: I had some interesting findings I'll talk about below, but for the trip out I only got 23 mpg.
    • However, that was a lot of 80mph driving and sprinting when the road was open to 90 mph. Always at least 5 to 10mph over the speed limit generally.
    • Used cruise control I'd say 90 or more percent of the time.
    • At 80 mph or over, on flat midwestern highways, I noticed the instantaneous mileage flickering down around a "visually averaged" 20 to 22 mpg and my overall average would decrease over time.
    • Dropping to 70 mph was HUGE. On same area, I observed instantaneous more in the 25 mpg range and my overall average would increase.
    • When I would hit those construction or lower speed limit areas (55 to 65), it would bounce around close to the "rated" highway mpg at around 27.
My conclusion is that this car has the aerodynamics of a brick. It's not low to the ground, and quite blunt in front profile.

Thinking about it, there's nothing really in the drive train to account for the widely varying mpg with speed. Then engine doesn't suddenly lose 20% efficiency or whatever.

Many times, due to the way turbulence and other aero effects form, their impact can be non-linear with respect to speed.

Anyway, that's my take. Drive it at the speed limit, it should be pretty good. Drive it like I did, you'll lose quite a bit even on the highway.

Still, doesn't bother me -- just reporting my observations with my car on this first long trip. I've pushed the Focus hard like that and the differences were not as wide but they were very apparent.

Overall, I have to rate this car very highly for what I use it for. Got all my gear, personal stuff, and me out here very comfortably and with minimum driver fatigue. Great car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
287 Posts
Let's run the math. Drag is proportional to the square of the velocity. If you compare 80 MPH to 70 MPH, there would be 30.6% more drag, so you could assume 30.6% more fuel consumption (inverse of economy). If you get 25 MPG at 70 MPH, that would mean you should get 24.1 MPG at 80 MPH. Since you got less than that, more is going on. I'll have to verify this, but I'm guessing the boost picks up at 80 MPH quite a bit.

Either way, the 2.0L is a gas hog at 80+ mph. My friend with a '16 Mustang GT (5.0L DOHC V8) gets 25 real MPG at 80 MPH for comparison...

Uniden RDs are great :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,338 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Let's run the math. Drag is proportional to the square of the velocity. If you compare 80 MPH to 70 MPH, there would be 30.6% more drag, so you could assume 30.6% more fuel consumption (inverse of economy). If you get 25 MPG at 70 MPH, that would mean you should get 24.1 MPG at 80 MPH. Since you got less than that, more is going on. I'll have to verify this, but I'm guessing the boost picks up at 80 MPH quite a bit.

Either way, the 2.0L is a gas hog at 80+ mph. My friend with a '16 Mustang GT (5.0L DOHC V8) gets 25 real MPG at 80 MPH for comparison...

Uniden RDs are great :)
Thanks for that. I think the general model assumes drag is more or less a linear function, but I've seen presentations that have shown disproportionate results due to some non-linear effects. However, I have no way to even begin to apply such a supposition to the Escape, lol.

If you find any good information on what might be happening, interested to hear it. In the meantime the obvious lesson is that not going faster is better for mileage... yeah, pretty obvious, lol.

I ran a Valentine 1 for years, and though I miss the "locator" function, I have to say this R3 is the real deal. It's combination of sensitivity and filtering really works well. I watched Vortex Radar and Veil Guy testing it for months before I finally sold the V1 and got the R3.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
I did a 3000 mile road trip over three weeks this past Summer with my '17 Ti and experienced the same - both comfort and mileage. I drove 1100 miles in one day (FL to CT) - a straight 18.5 hours, stopping only three times to fuel up (started on a full tank) and my bum was a little sore, but I think sitting in ANY car for 18.5 hours straight with only 3 stops will do that to any bum. I was VERY happy with the car. It fit ALL my stuff and I could see out every window. It drove flawlessly too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
I ran a Valentine 1 for years, and though I miss the "locator" function, I have to say this R3 is the real deal. It's combination of sensitivity and filtering really works well. I watched Vortex Radar and Veil Guy testing it for months before I finally sold the V1 and got the R3.
Take it from me and RDF: Vortex's assessments can be trusted, but VG should be ignored. This is going off topic, but the problem with super long-range sensitivity and no directional information is that you decrease your average speed on long trips. You spend more time slowed down, and sometimes you never even see a LEO. You can argue that it's safer, but unless you were getting tickets with V1, it's just a feeling. I'm guessing you never tried your V1 paired with an Android or iPhone app. A documentation screenshot of my JBV1 app (Android) is attached.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
I traded a 2010 Genesis sedan 4.6l V8 that got a hand-calculated 28.5-30.1 MPG at 80-85 MPH. My FE is getting about the same as John is experiencing, so I'm a little disappointed. I never expected to double my mileage by cutting my cylinder count in half. The FE is a bit brickish, but that's okay. It still looks good, in a sea of CUV lookalikes. Sure wish the gas tank was bigger, though. 300 miles per tank is a bit puny for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,338 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Take it from me and RDF: Vortex's assessments can be trusted, but VG should be ignored. This is going off topic, but the problem with super long-range sensitivity and no directional information is that you decrease your average speed on long trips. You spend more time slowed down, and sometimes you never even see a LEO. You can argue that it's safer, but unless you were getting tickets with V1, it's just a feeling. I'm guessing you never tried your V1 paired with an Android or iPhone app. A documentation screenshot of my JBV1 app (Android) is attached.
Oh, I played with the Valentine app with the bluetooth accessory and the YaV1 app as well. Got them years ago. I have a couple of problems with the idea though none whatsoever with the quality and depth of information presented.

All I want to do is avoid tickets, and I don't want to have to mount my phone where I can keep an eye on the screen, with the attendant cord mess and so forth. I like a nice clean installation. So after getting the apps, I seldom used them. Maximum average speed? That to me is something like "hyper-mileing" -- kind of a pain to keep trying to maximize something. I want to relax when I drive.

The V1 is great product until it's not. And where it falls flat is the fact that you either have to carry a chart, memorize arcane setup prompts, or you're forced to get the bluetooth add-on and an app to program it. So as you move from state to state, just to turn X-band on or off (I live between NJ and Ohio) you have to bring up the app and change configuration. With the R3 I reach up, and with a few taps of the buttons I'm in -- even in motion.

The Valentine design needs SERIOUS updating, and that's the simple truth. It is still a fine go-to -- but it has become more of a niche product.

Veil guy is correct about low-power instant-on which we have in PA, and few detectors will pick up the blips from cars ahead of you enough to warn you. That's a situation at the margins but one I encounter on rural highways when I travel for work. Simply put: in those cases sensitivity wins, hands down.

So, that's why there are different products at various price/performance levels. You choose what works for you and if absolute maximization of your speed is your deal, more information is essential -- but it comes at a cost.

RDF is a good place, but you can't just trust everything posted over there, anymore than you can here, lol. Veil Guy is not the end-all, but he's savvy and does have some good points on a number of things IF you take the time to understand where he's coming from. Vortex Radar I am subscribed to on YouTube, but not Veil Guy -- so that should show you where it all comes down, lol. Still he is not all wrong.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
The V1 is great product until it's not. And where it falls flat is the fact that you either have to carry a chart, memorize arcane setup prompts, or you're forced to get the bluetooth add-on and an app to program it. So as you move from state to state, just to turn X-band on or off (I live between NJ and Ohio) you have to bring up the app and change configuration. With the R3 I reach up, and with a few taps of the buttons I'm in -- even in motion.
To each his own. With my app, and others, I can turn any band or feature on/off and even change band segmentation with three screen taps. Next year, my app will be able to do that automatically by geofence.

So, that's why there are different products at various price/performance levels. You choose what works for you and if absolute maximization of your speed is your deal, more information is essential -- but it comes at a cost.
You're not alone. Many people don't want more info and prefer the simpler slow-down-when-it-beeps strategy. Again, to each his own.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,338 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
To each his own. With my app, and others, I can turn any band or feature on/off and even change band segmentation with three screen taps. Next year, my app will be able to do that automatically by geofence.

You're not alone. Many people don't want more info and prefer the simpler slow-down-when-it-beeps strategy. Again, to each his own.
True that. Well, I can reduce the sensitivity of the R3 very easily in "Advanced" mode to make it closer to a V1 if I decide that's the way to go but I can't see an advantage. Still won't run an app though for the reasons I mentioned previously. Don't need the cable clutter on long trips, and probably don't need it on short trips.

The kicker for me on the R3 was the ability to pick up people being pinged with low-power instant-on from further out than the V1 can. Definitely a potential threat in my state.

Thanks for the discussion and good luck with your app. I take if from your wording that you are authoring the app?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,338 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Okay, finished up in Iowa (project a success until the huge "dry cooling" system sprung a glycol leak -- but not my problem, lol).

Stopped tonight in Dayton, Ohio because I intend to visit the Air Force Museum tomorrow. About 9.5 hours from Independence, Iowa to Dayton, Ohio. Took it easy and went no more than 5 mph over the limit so I spent most of my time around 75 mph. I averaged 25.2 mpg which is more that 2 mpg than my frantic straight-through 17.5 hour trip when I drove up there. I pushed the FE hard on the way up and got just 23 mpg.

Speed makes a huge difference, lol. Still enjoyed the drive very much. A relatively quiet, and very comfortable vehicle for this 62 year old frame. Nav worked flawlessly as well, old maps and all.

Loving the Escape even more.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top