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Have smilar problem, in dealer now. Below is the info they provided. The short block needs to be placed, so sad....
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TSB #SSM 47849
NHTSA ID #10156569
Effective Date: MARCH 07 2019
Summary: Some 2014-2019 Fusion and 2017-2019 Escape equipped with 1.5L Ecoboost engine may exhibit coolant consumption and white smoke concern. Follow the Cooling System Pressure Test procedure in WSM, Section 303-03, pressurize the cooling syste
Does anyone have a copy of this TSB?
 

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Thanks!

It might be worthwhile for everyone to start logging their experience here.
 

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Just in.2018 Escape 1.5 Ecoboost 19650 mile, Check engine light came on p302 :-( , Not looking forward to this from what I read here. Dropping off at dealer monday
 

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Just in.2018 Escape 1.5 Ecoboost 19650 mile, Check engine light came on p302 :-( , Not looking forward to this from what I read here. Dropping off at dealer monday
Good luck ,I have 2018 Ford Escape been waiting 1 month now for the dealer to put my New Engine in, I have a loaner though a 2019 1.5 Eco boost same engine no light on that yet lol, hope everything goes well for you
 

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Good luck ,I have 2018 Ford Escape been waiting 1 month now for the dealer to put my New Engine in, I have a loaner though a 2019 1.5 Eco boost same engine no light on that yet lol, hope everything goes well for you
They gave me a 2019 Ranger fully loaded, gets about the game MPG. Have to swap out the loaner every 2100 miles. It's going to be a long wait they said :-(
 

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Got my 2.0l replaced on my '17 at 47,000 miles. Just got it back Monday. Took seven days. I must have hit the parts lottery.

From the paperwork looks like a long block and related parts.
 

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Got my 2.0l replaced on my '17 at 47,000 miles. Just got it back Monday. Took seven days. I must have hit the parts lottery.

From the paperwork looks like a long block and related parts.

When did you first notice a problem? Trying to decide on a extended warranty on a 2017 that has 70 K and "seems" good.
 

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When did you first notice a problem? Trying to decide on a extended warranty on a 2017 that has 70 K and "seems" good.
I started noticing rough startups back in early August. No smoke out the tailpipe. Check engine light finally came on. Two week wait for an appointment. Car drove fine otherwise and the check engine light turned off by the time I took the car in. Unfortunately after doing the standard tests for this issue there wasn't any confirmed evidence of coolant in the cylinder. I knew what was up, and the dealer knew what was up but Ford tied their hands without 'proof'. The dealer did replace a fuel injector and sent me on my way. I think they just wanted it to look like they did something. They also patched my tire and cleaned the valves for free. Not sure what that actually entailed but it was nice that they didn't use it as an opportunity to 'up-sell' me on that service.

Car continued to do rough starts in the morning off and on and after 3 weeks I noticed coolant levels going down quite bit. Took it in for a 'top off' and the dealer gave me a gallon of coolant to take with me. Started keeping a log for the dealer. We were waiting for the check engine light to come back on. I dropped it off. They finally confirmed the coolant in the cylinder and got started.

Drove an Eco Sport loaner the first time. Would never buy one but it wasn't horrible for the few days I had it. Got a 2019 Escape 1.5l loaner the second time. Wow... no power but the lane keeping system and related tech was nice!
 

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my 2018 escape 2.0 liter just got a new engine for this exact same issue and that took a month and now they have had it for 2 more weeks because it was killing the battery and dieseling and they cant figure it out and have to call a ford engineer.
 

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I really think that Ford should offer to buy back all vehicles equipped with the 1.6L, 1.5L and 2.0L Ecoboost engines. At first it seemed that the 2.0L Ecoboost engines were immune from the problems, but it seems now that they are all affected. The problem was bad machining and bad castings of the engine blocks; cracks were present in many blocks and they widened over time, and allowed coolant to seep into the cylinders. I think that in your case the powertrain control module, or PCM, was not reprogrammed properly. There have been PCM issues with replacement engines. These engines were just not ready for prime time, and Ford owners have been paying the price.
 

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I really think that Ford should offer to buy back all vehicles equipped with the 1.6L, 1.5L and 2.0L Ecoboost engines. At first it seemed that the 2.0L Ecoboost engines were immune from the problems, but it seems now that they are all affected. The problem was bad machining and bad castings of the engine blocks; cracks were present in many blocks and they widened over time, and allowed coolant to seep into the cylinders. I think that in your case the powertrain control module, or PCM, was not reprogrammed properly. There have been PCM issues with replacement engines. These engines were just not ready for prime time, and Ford owners have been paying the price.
This issue might have occurred in all the engines. But I’m sure it is a very small portion of the total number of these engines that are effected by this issue. So why would Ford buy back all of the engines. Especially when they will be buying back perfectly working engines, for the high majority of owners? Doesn’t make any sense.
 

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This issue might have occurred in all the engines. But I’m sure it is a very small portion of the total number of these engines that are effected by this issue. So why would Ford buy back all of the engines. Especially when they will be buying back perfectly working engines, for the high majority of owners? Doesn’t make any sense.
It is known by now that there are a LOT of those failed engines out there. Some dealerships have a number of engines on backorder. Right now it appears that it's not a matter of it, but when, these engines will fail. Not enough testing was done before these were put into production cars.

If not a buyback, Ford should extend the powertrain warranty to 150,000 miles. If there's no problem with the engines, then Ford isn't going to be eating a lot of repair costs, right? But if there ARE problems, Ford should cover them under an extended powertrain warranty. People expect their cars to go at least 150,000 miles - a Saab 900 I owned went over 300,000. It's ludicrous that these Ecoboost engines have been failing so many times just out of warranty. And I'm sorry--an engine that won't go 100,000 miles with regular maintenance isn't worth a damn.
 

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It is known by now that there are a LOT of those failed engines out there. Some dealerships have a number of engines on backorder. Right now it appears that it's not a matter of it, but when, these engines will fail. Not enough testing was done before these were put into production cars.

If not a buyback, Ford should extend the powertrain warranty to 150,000 miles. If there's no problem with the engines, then Ford isn't going to be eating a lot of repair costs, right? But if there ARE problems, Ford should cover them under an extended powertrain warranty. People expect their cars to go at least 150,000 miles - a Saab 900 I owned went over 300,000. It's ludicrous that these Ecoboost engines have been failing so many times just out of warranty. And I'm sorry--an engine that won't go 100,000 miles with regular maintenance isn't worth a damn.
Do you have any "HARD" data to back up your opinion? For each engine, something like: total engines produced, total engine failures. Any hard data? From following this board and as a former owner of the 1.6 Ecoboost, I may have a tendancy to agree with you on a problem with that specific engine. My GUESS is a design flaw compounded by tolerance issues in manufacturing. The 2.0 has been a pretty solid engine IMHO. Not to say there are no problems at all. You also have to remember that people largely populate boards like this because the do have problems or questions. Folks that do not have problems usually do not broadcast "I have 150,000 miles and not a single issue". Having said that, if you search the threads on this board you will find some very high mileage 1.6 Ecoboosts performing as designed.
 

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I really think that Ford should offer to buy back all vehicles equipped with the 1.6L, 1.5L and 2.0L Ecoboost engines. At first it seemed that the 2.0L Ecoboost engines were immune from the problems, but it seems now that they are all affected. The problem was bad machining and bad castings of the engine blocks; cracks were present in many blocks and they widened over time, and allowed coolant to seep into the cylinders. I think that in your case the powertrain control module, or PCM, was not reprogrammed properly. There have been PCM issues with replacement engines. These engines were just not ready for prime time, and Ford owners have been paying the price.
If Ford bought back all vehicles with 1.6L, 1.5L, and 2L Ecoboost engines they would be buying back almost every Escape they have sold over recent years.
I guarantee if you investigate further you will find that only a small percentage of recent engines have failed, especially in the case of the 2 Ecoboost and probably no more percentage wise than any other car brand.

As mentioned by others here, you only hear of the failures on forums such as this, not the successes re longevity of these engines. 😉. In saying that I can certainly understand the frustration and bitterness towards Ford by people who have had dramas with these engines and the assumptions that all the engines are faulty. :mad:

This particular article refers to the earlier 1.6L engines where most of the problems seem to be and many were recalled. by Ford.
 

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It is known by now that there are a LOT of those failed engines out there. Some dealerships have a number of engines on backorder. Right now it appears that it's not a matter of it, but when, these engines will fail. Not enough testing was done before these were put into production cars.

If not a buyback, Ford should extend the powertrain warranty to 150,000 miles. If there's no problem with the engines, then Ford isn't going to be eating a lot of repair costs, right? But if there ARE problems, Ford should cover them under an extended powertrain warranty. People expect their cars to go at least 150,000 miles - a Saab 900 I owned went over 300,000. It's ludicrous that these Ecoboost engines have been failing so many times just out of warranty. And I'm sorry--an engine that won't go 100,000 miles with regular maintenance isn't worth a damn.
Since the open deck design of the 1.5 and 1.6L engine comes from Mazda, one has to wonder if Mazda engines have this same problem. If not, then one has to point the finger at Ford's casting and machining operations. In a quick Internet search, I haven't found any similar complaints about Mazda engines; they had some other problems with VVT as well as premature timing belt failure on some engines.
This problem has me considering that my next car will come earlier than my usual 10 years/100K miles. I'll be looking to replace my Escape before the drivetrain warranty expires, probably back to a German car: ,a VW or BMW, which I've never had engine problems, nor rust problems, as compared to what I see on American cars.
 

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Do you have any "HARD" data to back up your opinion? For each engine, something like: total engines produced, total engine failures. Any hard data? From following this board and as a former owner of the 1.6 Ecoboost, I may have a tendancy to agree with you on a problem with that specific engine. My GUESS is a design flaw compounded by tolerance issues in manufacturing. The 2.0 has been a pretty solid engine IMHO. Not to say there are no problems at all. You also have to remember that people largely populate boards like this because the do have problems or questions. Folks that do not have problems usually do not broadcast "I have 150,000 miles and not a single issue". Having said that, if you search the threads on this board you will find some very high mileage 1.6 Ecoboosts performing as designed.
I don't think Ford is going to make public how many Ecoboosts have failed. And I don't have access to their data. However, on this and on other forums, and on other car sites, I have read about instances of the 1.6L and 2.0L engines failing--for the same reason: cracked engine blocks. We already know that Ford had switched to the 1.5L engines manufactured in Rumania. The 1.6L engines were manufactured in the UK. So, while I don't have access to all the data, I've seen enough to convince me that there's a quality control problem. Yes, not all of them have failed, and some may last a long time. But aluminum is not as forgiving in castings as cast iron, and what starts out as a small crack or fissure can enlarge over time, with the cycles of heating and cooling. I think Ford should have issued an extended powertrain warranty on all of these engines--it's not right for someone to have to replace an engine right around 65,000 miles or less.
 

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I’m not real worried about my 2.0 Ecoboost. I wouldn’t have any problem buying another Ford with the 2.0 Ecoboost engine. The 1.5 Ecoboost 4 cylinder is something I would never consider buying. Keeping your crusade going isn’t really making you any friends here.
 

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I am at a loss here. I don't know why you would take umbrage at my sharing my personal experience and what I have learned about those engines. As Scotty Kilmer says, you shouldn't get emotionally attached to any car. If something is good, then I will call it good. If something is evidencing problems, it doesn't help anybody to cover it up. Here's the takeaway: if you have learned about these problems, you can keep a close watch on your Ecoboost engine--and if it misfires, don't hesitate to take it to the dealer, because you do NOT want to have to deal with a cracked engine block outside the warranty period. You are looking at something like $9,000 in parts and labor if that happens. If a person is thinking, "Oh--that's probably just a bad spark plug or coil, I'll take care of it later," and later is 500 miles outside the powertrain warranty, then guess what? You now OWN that problem--it's yours, lock, stock and barrel. Now, I also have a 1988 Ford Crown Victoria with the 5.0L fuel-injected engine. Do you think many of those have failed? If they did, the police departments wouldn't have kept buying them. Another problem with the Ecoboosts---and ALL direct injected engines--is that fuel is injected directly into the cylinders, not over the valves. So in ALL of these engines, the intake valves can get carboned up because no gasoline is washing off the oil residue from the recirculated crankcase vapors. I think ALL makers of these engines should install oil catch cans to minimize the carboning up of the intake valves. Like I said, I don't become a "fan" of any make of automobile and then disdain to hear about any problems with them. Forewarned is forearmed.
 
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