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@JRR I think everyone here agrees with you that there is a fault with SOME of these engines especially the earlier 1.6L ones.
Perhaps other posters take 'umbrage' with you saying that it now seems ALL 2L Ecoboost engines are affected...there is no evidence of that. Also you stated that Ford should offer to do a buy back of all Fords with the 1.6L, 1.5L and 2L engines'. This would affect almost every Escape manufactured in recent times, faulty or not, and there would be no more Fords made if they did that coz Ford would go broke. :p
You also suggest that if not a buy back Ford should extend the powertrain warranty to 150,000 miles. No car manufacturer is going to do that as too many variables come into play.
Sure, there are a lot of complaints here but that does not mean that most of these engines are faulty and to my knowledge most of the problems were with the earlier 1.6L turbos from 2010 to 2014 when Ford had it's first crack at this style of engine.
On this forum alone if you compared the number of complaints about all these engines with the total number of contributing members the percentage would be very low.
I respect your opinion and comments but just suggest that you do not 'tar them all with the same brush' as most owners with the same engines do not have a problem to my knowledge.:)
 

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@JRR I think everyone here agrees with you that there is a fault with SOME of these engines especially the earlier 1.6L ones.
Perhaps other posters take 'umbrage' with you saying that it now seems ALL 2L Ecoboost engines are affected...there is no evidence of that. Also you stated that Ford should offer to do a buy back of all Fords with the 1.6L, 1.5L and 2L engines'. This would affect almost every Escape manufactured in recent times, faulty or not, and there would be no more Fords made if they did that coz Ford would go broke. :p
You also suggest that if not a buy back Ford should extend the powertrain warranty to 150,000 miles. No car manufacturer is going to do that as too many variables come into play.
Sure, there are a lot of complaints here but that does not mean that most of these engines are faulty and to my knowledge most of the problems were with the earlier 1.6L turbos from 2010 to 2014 when Ford had it's first crack at this style of engine.
On this forum alone if you compared the number of complaints about all these engines with the total number of contributing members the percentage would be very low.
I respect your opinion and comments but just suggest that you do not 'tar them all with the same brush' as most owners with the same engines do not have a problem to my knowledge.:)
Believe me, I do not want other Escape owners to have problems, and the overall design of the Ecoboost engines, I think, is good. I garnered my information from this forum, other forums and the online automotive press. Now, my own Ford dealer says mine is the only Escape to have had this problem. That's good. What is scary is that I had a safety margin of just eight months before the powertrain warranty was supposed to run out, and a number of Escape owners experienced problems just outside the warranty. In fact, I credit some trips to the Southern US from Canada as perhaps providing the additional "stress" to make the engine fail when it did, i.e., those long trips and being in stop-and-go traffic at times undoubtedly made the problem appear quicker. As I said before, I have a 1988 Crown Vic that runs great, so I'm not knocking Ford or trying to make anyone have bad dreams. I posted my experiences and information so it could help others---so they wouldn't "put off" a trip to the dealer that could save them thousands of dollars. I still say that Ford should extend the powertrain warranties, but doing better than Honda's "secret warranty" some time ago on transmissions (you had to ask for it to get it). I am also hoping that the new engine holds up and I will report how it is doing. I'm going to be running Royal Purple synthetic oil in it after the "break-in" period, and I am installing an oil catch can to keep the intake valves from getting a carbon buildup. I wish everyone the best--and especially hope that no one has an engine failure out of warranty!
 

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If Ford bought back all vehicles with 1.6L, 1.5L, and 2L Ecoboost engines they would be buying back almost every Escape they have sold over recent years.
Don't forget many Fusions dating back to 2014
 

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I am at a loss here. I don't know why you would take umbrage at my sharing my personal experience and what I have learned about those engines. As Scotty Kilmer says, you shouldn't get emotionally attached to any car. If something is good, then I will call it good. If something is evidencing problems, it doesn't help anybody to cover it up. Here's the takeaway: if you have learned about these problems, you can keep a close watch on your Ecoboost engine--and if it misfires, don't hesitate to take it to the dealer, because you do NOT want to have to deal with a cracked engine block outside the warranty period. You are looking at something like $9,000 in parts and labor if that happens. If a person is thinking, "Oh--that's probably just a bad spark plug or coil, I'll take care of it later," and later is 500 miles outside the powertrain warranty, then guess what? You now OWN that problem--it's yours, lock, stock and barrel. Now, I also have a 1988 Ford Crown Victoria with the 5.0L fuel-injected engine. Do you think many of those have failed? If they did, the police departments wouldn't have kept buying them. Another problem with the Ecoboosts---and ALL direct injected engines--is that fuel is injected directly into the cylinders, not over the valves. So in ALL of these engines, the intake valves can get carboned up because no gasoline is washing off the oil residue from the recirculated crankcase vapors. I think ALL makers of these engines should install oil catch cans to minimize the carboning up of the intake valves. Like I said, I don't become a "fan" of any make of automobile and then disdain to hear about any problems with them. Forewarned is forearmed.
The matter is not us taking issue with your personal experiences nor is it "we are too emotionally involved". Rather, it is the opposite. You seem to be very emotionally involved on the issue and making a generalization of the entire universe of engines ( 1.6, 1.5, 2.0 EB) based only on your experience and admittedly lack of access to hard data. As I said in an earlier posting, I had the 1.6 engine (open block design). I was uncomfortable with it. The 2.0 seems to be a solid engine. Having said that, I am suffering from the same lack of data that you are but my engineering training has taught me not to make generalization on the whole on the basis of limited experience.
 

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There are a LOT of these engines in different cars, so like others have said, even with what seems to be a lot of failures, it has to be a small percentage.

There seems to be a bit of a difference between the 1.6 and 1.5, including a completely different assemble source.

I am still trying to figure out if the typical failure is a early life (assembly) issue, or a totally random (design) issue?

What I don't get is why Ford is not stepping up with some customer courtesy funds.
It would go a long way, however it also hints at blame, so "risk management" might be the real problem.

This takes me back to a Ford company car I had long ago, with bad fuel pumps. Bosch would provide free replacement parts if Ford would process it as a parts warranty, but they wouldn't!
 

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have read about instances of the 1.6L and 2.0L engines failing--for the same reason: cracked engine blocks.
I’ve read this whole thread and have not seen any mention of cracks. The issue when detailed by one poster is surface of block .001 out of spec. Not that that’s any better than a crack, but it’s different. Do you have accounts of actual cracks or does it come from coolant in cylinder = crack?

Range Rovers went through this with cooling and blocks in the P38 Range Rover. Late 90’s - early 00’s. I think it was the 4.0 block. (I used to know all the details but the brain is gone from breathing so long) Would crack behind the cast iron cylinder liner. Rumors were the blocks were “porous”. This porous thing got repeated ad nauseum. Imagine what aluminum would look like to allow coolant to pass through?

Btw, that block/engine design was purchased from GM in the late 60’s. It was their 1962 215 cu inch aluminum V8. Buick and Olds used it. Nobody except drag racers, (it’s light) wanted a 215 V8 at that time. That engine design pretty much went 40 years with changes to heads, intakes, and electronic fuel injection/mapping, then ignition mapping.
Nevertheless, the voodoo surrounding those push rod V8’s was unbelievable. People and some mechanics had the weirdest ideas about them.
 

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If you read the "official" Ford repair information, I think it is either the block or the head, but not both that needed to be repaired.

My guess is, could have been bad metallurgy, or bad machining. Only those inside Ford (and I don't mean dealers) would really know.
 

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Should I have confidense in the new block?

Has anyone gone through this engine replacement with the Escape? Are the replacement engines any more reliable than the original one?
I just had my engine replaced due to coolant leaking into the 2018 Escape engine. Less than a week later the heard a flapping noise that sounded like it was under the car. I took my car back to the Ford dealership and now my Turbo needs to be replaced....
 

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I just had my engine replaced due to coolant leaking into the 2018 Escape engine. Less than a week later the heard a flapping noise that sounded like it was under the car. I took my car back to the Ford dealership and now my Turbo needs to be replaced....
Good luck. Our replacement engine seems to be doing OK, but now the car is doing weird stuff, like the radio and clock resetting to different time/stations or just losing memory. Door locks not working, remote start temperamental... Glad this is a lease and will be going back to Ford in a year.
 

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OK--I've got about 750 miles on the replacement engine for my Ford Escape, and so far there are NO issues. Now, some folks thought I was too "emotionally involved" with this issue, but I was objectively reporting what I had learned in other forums and from Internet news articles. There HAS been a problem with the Ecoboost engines. I also learned that there was a "bad batch" of engine castings made in the UK engine plant and that a number of people got canned for letting these quality control issues get out of hand. I am NOT accusing Ford of making junk, but everyone needs to know a few things about the Ecoboost engines. First, they operate a higher pressures than engines of the past. Secondly, because they use Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI), the intake valves are not getting "washed" with any gasoline, and they tend to build up carbon for that reason. So carbon cleaning is in the future for everyone who drives these engines very much--and Ford has not worked out an official "fix" for the carbon buildup. Toyota engines vary their injection from GDI to spraying gas over the valves. Scotty Kilmer, who has been a mechanic for 52 years and has his own YouTube channel, recommends that you use only synthetic oil in the Ecoboost engines and change the oil every 5,000 miles. I plan to hang onto my Escape, and how the new engine performs will be a huge determinant as to whether I ever buy another Ford product. I will say that I LOVE how the Escape rides and handles, I really like the instrument layout, and I like the huge cargo space. Truth be told, I think the engines of old--tough cast iron ones--were the best. But I'm giving this new engine every benefit of the doubt.
 

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OK--I've got about 750 miles on the replacement engine for my Ford Escape, and so far there are NO issues. Now, some folks thought I was too "emotionally involved" with this issue, but I was objectively reporting what I had learned in other forums and from Internet news articles. There HAS been a problem with the Ecoboost engines. I also learned that there was a "bad batch" of engine castings made in the UK engine plant and that a number of people got canned for letting these quality control issues get out of hand. I am NOT accusing Ford of making junk, but everyone needs to know a few things about the Ecoboost engines. First, they operate a higher pressures than engines of the past. Secondly, because they use Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI), the intake valves are not getting "washed" with any gasoline, and they tend to build up carbon for that reason. So carbon cleaning is in the future for everyone who drives these engines very much--and Ford has not worked out an official "fix" for the carbon buildup. Toyota engines vary their injection from GDI to spraying gas over the valves. Scotty Kilmer, who has been a mechanic for 52 years and has his own YouTube channel, recommends that you use only synthetic oil in the Ecoboost engines and change the oil every 5,000 miles. I plan to hang onto my Escape, and how the new engine performs will be a huge determinant as to whether I ever buy another Ford product. I will say that I LOVE how the Escape rides and handles, I really like the instrument layout, and I like the huge cargo space. Truth be told, I think the engines of old--tough cast iron ones--were the best. But I'm giving this new engine every benefit of the doubt.
Was yours a 2.0 or a 1.5 and what yr?? Glad to hear you obtained some info on why, poor UK casting....
 

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Scotty Kilmer, who has been a mechanic for 52 years and has his own YouTube channel, recommends that you use only synthetic oil in the Ecoboost engines and change the oil every 5,000 miles.
Forget what Scotty says- read the owner's manual and use an oil that meets the required Ford Oil Specifications for your engine.
 

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Was yours a 2.0 or a 1.5 and what yr?? Glad to hear you obtained some info on why, poor UK casting....
I had the 1.6L Ecoboost engine in my 2015 Ford Escape. It was replaced with another "long block" 1.6L engine. A "big batch" of engine castings at the UK plant contained flaws, such as indentations and cracks in the blocks. The first indication that you had a cracked block was an engine code that you had a misfire in one of the cylinders, usually #2 or #3. In my engine, it was cylinder #2. My mechanic thought it was just a bad spark plug. The spark plug for #2 cylinder was replaced and there were no more problems for a while. Then about 1,400 miles and a month later, the problem recurred. So I changed the coil for that cylinder. That worked for about two weeks. Then, one morning after I dropped off my wife for work, the engine blew out all the coolant. I immediately pulled over and called CAA for a tow truck. At a local CAA-approved repair facility, the mechanics refilled the radiator with water, restarted the car and noted that some remaining anti-freeze was coming out as vapor from the dual exhausts. I drove it over to the Ford dealer and left it with them. The dealer did an overnight pressure test of the engine, which confirmed that coolant was seeping into the #2 cylinder as the result of a cracked block. They ordered a new long-block engine for me. Now, the engine replacement was covered under the powertrain warranty--six years or 100,000km in Canada. I read in some other forums and Internet sites that some Escape owners were caught with this problem outside the powertrain warranty period, and they were stuck with bills around $9,000. If that had been my situation, I would have junked the car. I even considered doing a trade for a new Ford Edge. The dealer, however, only wanted to give me $9,777 for a trade-in on a $40,000 vehicle, and my own Escape had cost around $30,000. So they were offering me less than a third of what I had paid for my Escape. I rejected that offer out-of-hand. So my hope is to get another four or five years' use out of this vehicle. Frankly, my next vehicle will be a Toyota, because there is absolutely no doubt that these are the longest-lasting vehicles currently made---of course, no make of vehicle is without its problems. Before this Escape I had driven Saabs for the previous 25 years--and would probably still be doing so if GM had not bought and ruined Saab, causing it to go into bankruptcy. I have also found out that the Escape is Ford's No. 2 selling vehicle, just below the F-150 pickup. If I were to buy another Ford, it would be the Edge with a V6 or an Explorer. I had a "loaner" car from Ford during the 4 - 5 weeks that my car was in the shop---it was a 2019 Ford Escape from Enterprise. This vehicle had the 2.0L Ecoboost engine. It seemed to have a little more get-up-and-go than the 1.6L, and fewer problems have been reported with the 2.0L Ecoboost (although it has not been immune). But, overall, I liked the instrument layout and the handling of my own 2015 Escape better, and I absolutely hated that "engine stop" feature that shut down the engine every time you came to a halt. That feature is really going to stress your starter and battery! I wouldn't own a car with that feature! Anyway, I hope this provides some information--and hope--for those of you with Ecoboost engines. Just be sure to use a good synthetic oil like Mobil 1 and to change the oil and filter every 5,000 miles (7,500km). And if you DO get a code for a misfire in one of the cylinders, get the engine pressure tested to make sure it doesn't have a cracked block before you go out of the powertrain warranty!
 

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Forget what Scotty says- read the owner's manual and use an oil that meets the required Ford Oil Specifications for your engine.
Scotty recommends following the owner's manual regardless of how long the oil manufacturer says you can go between changes. And a good synthetic--which meets all the Ford oil specifications--will withstand the higher pressures and temperatures in the Ecoboost engines better than any "dino" oil.
 

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I had the 1.6L Ecoboost engine in my 2015 Ford Escape. It was replaced with another "long block" 1.6L engine. A "big batch" of engine castings at the UK plant contained flaws, such as indentations and cracks in the blocks. The first indication that you had a cracked block was an engine code that you had a misfire in one of the cylinders, usually #2 or #3. In my engine, it was cylinder #2. My mechanic thought it was just a bad spark plug. The spark plug for #2 cylinder was replaced and there were no more problems for a while. Then about 1,400 miles and a month later, the problem recurred. So I changed the coil for that cylinder. That worked for about two weeks. Then, one morning after I dropped off my wife for work, the engine blew out all the coolant. I immediately pulled over and called CAA for a tow truck. At a local CAA-approved repair facility, the mechanics refilled the radiator with water, restarted the car and noted that some remaining anti-freeze was coming out as vapor from the dual exhausts. I drove it over to the Ford dealer and left it with them. The dealer did an overnight pressure test of the engine, which confirmed that coolant was seeping into the #2 cylinder as the result of a cracked block. They ordered a new long-block engine for me. Now, the engine replacement was covered under the powertrain warranty--six years or 100,000km in Canada. I read in some other forums and Internet sites that some Escape owners were caught with this problem outside the powertrain warranty period, and they were stuck with bills around $9,000. If that had been my situation, I would have junked the car. I even considered doing a trade for a new Ford Edge. The dealer, however, only wanted to give me $9,777 for a trade-in on a $40,000 vehicle, and my own Escape had cost around $30,000. So they were offering me less than a third of what I had paid for my Escape. I rejected that offer out-of-hand. So my hope is to get another four or five years' use out of this vehicle. Frankly, my next vehicle will be a Toyota, because there is absolutely no doubt that these are the longest-lasting vehicles currently made---of course, no make of vehicle is without its problems. Before this Escape I had driven Saabs for the previous 25 years--and would probably still be doing so if GM had not bought and ruined Saab, causing it to go into bankruptcy. I have also found out that the Escape is Ford's No. 2 selling vehicle, just below the F-150 pickup. If I were to buy another Ford, it would be the Edge with a V6 or an Explorer. I had a "loaner" car from Ford during the 4 - 5 weeks that my car was in the shop---it was a 2019 Ford Escape from Enterprise. This vehicle had the 2.0L Ecoboost engine. It seemed to have a little more get-up-and-go than the 1.6L, and fewer problems have been reported with the 2.0L Ecoboost (although it has not been immune). But, overall, I liked the instrument layout and the handling of my own 2015 Escape better, and I absolutely hated that "engine stop" feature that shut down the engine every time you came to a halt. That feature is really going to stress your starter and battery! I wouldn't own a car with that feature! Anyway, I hope this provides some information--and hope--for those of you with Ecoboost engines. Just be sure to use a good synthetic oil like Mobil 1 and to change the oil and filter every 5,000 miles (7,500km). And if you DO get a code for a misfire in one of the cylinders, get the engine pressure tested to make sure it doesn't have a cracked block before you go out of the powertrain warranty!
Thanks for the reply, I agree on the full syn oil too...
 

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Was yours a 2.0 or a 1.5 and what yr?? Glad to hear you obtained some info on why, poor UK casting....
Mine was the 1.6L Ecoboost. There have not been so many problems with the 2.0L Ecoboost, but some engines have been affected by various maladies like my 1.6L. What's interesting is that this 1.6L engine makes 178 horsepower in the Escape; in my 1988 Crown Victoria, the 5.0L V8 makes only 150 hp! So the Escape engine is working with higher pressures to exceed the power of the old V8.
 

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Mine was the 1.6L Ecoboost. There have not been so many problems with the 2.0L Ecoboost, but some engines have been affected by various maladies like my 1.6L. What's interesting is that this 1.6L engine makes 178 horsepower in the Escape; in my 1988 Crown Victoria, the 5.0L V8 makes only 150 hp! So the Escape engine is working with higher pressures to exceed the power of the old V8.
Yes, That's why I go easy on my turbo even though I know it has plenty of get up and go if I need it..Also let it warm up slow and steady...no jackass starts and stops..Mine has 245 hp and 270ft of torque..
 

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Scotty recommends following the owner's manual regardless of how long the oil manufacturer says you can go between changes. And a good synthetic--which meets all the Ford oil specifications--will withstand the higher pressures and temperatures in the Ecoboost engines better than any "dino" oil.
Just remember Scotty doesn't recommend anything out of the goodness of his heart- he gets commissions on the products he posts links to. Check some of the links in his videos- they're not the normal links you find via Google.

I think the engineers at Ford know a bit more than him about the oil requirements for their engines. There's some info here on the various Ford oil specs https://www.oilspecifications.org/ford.php

Also, the definition of what constitutes a "synthetic" oil can be very murky. Have a read of this https://www.roadandtrack.com/car-culture/a12007368/what-makes-synthetic-oil-better/

Anyway, this is going off topic. Back to the engine misfire discussion.
 
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