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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know a few people have been asking in regards to finding all-terrain tires that have no fitment/rubbing issues. I decided to place my input on a set that I just mounted today.

I ended up getting the Toyo Open Country A/T II tires at the size of 255/55/18. I would confidently say that this is the largest tire in the A/T category and probably the only A/T size that you are going to be able to find that will fit the FE on the factory 18" wheels.

It is a snug fitment however there are no rubbing issues, however I have noticed the turning to be softer than what I was running on before which was 245/60/18. This isn't a big issue for me, rather it is just an adjustment period of turning. There is about an inch of space between the front sidewall of the tires and front fender. And a little more of an inch from the back of the front tire to the front quarter panel heading toward the doors. For the rear tires, it's about an inch and a half gap between the front of the tire and rear quarter panel toward the rear door and maybe about an inch 3/4 from the back of the tire sidewall to the front of back bumper.

So far on dry pavement I've been sticking to the road much better than to the Bridgestone Duelers H/T. The Toyos are highly reviewed from all aspects of pavement, whether wet or dry.

Tomorrow it's supposed to rain, so hopefully I can provide an update on the handling on these tires.

Pictures to follow for anyone interested in the fitment.
 

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I like the knobby-ness of the tires. In your second to last picture is that showing rubbing. when you dip your rims could you post another pic to see how it'll look.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Apologies to everyone on the delayed update. I went on a two day getaway with the wife in the Poconos. I was able to take the car out during wet weather and the car and tires handled beautifully on wet pavement. Felt extremely confident with the handling on the twist and turns and cornering with the car. With the Bridgestone Deulers still having a decent amount of tread on the tires the rear end would slide out from under me with slight cornering, however the Toyos have made me regain confidence with the FE again.

The tires do rub however there is only rubbing at full crank. I'm not sure if spacers would fix the issue or not, your input would be greatly appreciated. Because of the tires being heavier and the brakes already are on the worn end, it's taking longer to stop. So now I am looking into replacing the brakes and rotors and thinking of getting slotted/vented rotors. Any input would be appreciated as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I like the knobby-ness of the tires. In your second to last picture is that showing rubbing. when you dip your rims could you post another pic to see how it'll look.
Yes that picture is showing rubbing but that is at full crank. Rims won't be dipped for awhile. Maybe not until summer or towards the end. Right now the next thing I have lined up is deleting the chrome.
 

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The tires do rub however there is only rubbing at full crank. I'm not sure if spacers would fix the issue or not, your input would be greatly appreciated. Because of the tires being heavier and the brakes already are on the worn end, it's taking longer to stop. So now I am looking into replacing the brakes and rotors and thinking of getting slotted/vented rotors. Any input would be appreciated as well.
spacers wont help. the tires will just swing through a larger arc.
rubbing the liner doesnt hurt. just make sure there is nothing behind it.

heavier tires will hurt braking. slotted/drilled rotors won't help. they just provide stress risers which may contribute to cracking. a qualitly blank rotor is all that is needed. the best bet for an upgrade is a preformance pad, like EBC yellow or Halk HPS.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
spacers wont help. the tires will just swing through a larger arc.
rubbing the liner doesnt hurt. just make sure there is nothing behind it.

heavier tires will hurt braking. slotted/drilled rotors won't help. they just provide stress risers which may contribute to cracking. a qualitly blank rotor is all that is needed. the best bet for an upgrade is a preformance pad, like EBC yellow or Halk HPS.
Thanks for the feedback. I wasn't really concerned about the rubbing, the tire isn't hard pressed against the liner and I haven't noticed anything being left behind.
 

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Thanks for the feedback. I wasn't really concerned about the rubbing, the tire isn't hard pressed against the liner and I haven't noticed anything being left behind.
just be sure you know what is behind it.

I've rubbed right through on my Focus and they're is wiring harnesses and AC piping back there. So double check the FE.
 

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I use large knobby tires for my 'toy' truck for offroading. What you will do if you try and put larger (or even just knobbier) tiers on the FE is hurt acceleration, turning and braking, more road noise and lower MPG.. Acceleration and Braking will be worse just due to the generally higher weight of AT tires. Steering will be worse due to taller sidewalls being more prone to flex but also somewhat due to the knobby tread not being as grippy on pavement.
 

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I use large knobby tires for my 'toy' truck for offroading. What you will do if you try and put larger (or even just knobbier) tiers on the FE is hurt acceleration, turning and braking, more road noise and lower MPG.. Acceleration and Braking will be worse just due to the generally higher weight of AT tires. Steering will be worse due to taller sidewalls being more prone to flex but also somewhat due to the knobby tread not being as grippy on pavement.
due to fitment challenges in getting AT tires on the Escape, i don't think anyone casually puts those tires on. They know what they're getting into, and would have a good reason for it to offset the negatives that you state. Reasons like aesthetics, not having the driveway space or $$ for a toy truck, need to haul the family and their gear up some rough roads where a 2 seater truck wont work, etc.
 

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I use large knobby tires for my 'toy' truck for offroading. What you will do if you try and put larger (or even just knobbier) tiers on the FE is hurt acceleration, turning and braking, more road noise and lower MPG.. Acceleration and Braking will be worse just due to the generally higher weight of AT tires. Steering will be worse due to taller sidewalls being more prone to flex but also somewhat due to the knobby tread not being as grippy on pavement.
Plus the drivetrain components aren't engineered to rotate the extra mass.
 
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