2013+ Ford Escape Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
518 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey ladies and gents,

I was wondering what kinds of things have you all tried to get better or even worse mpg? Things such as tire sizes/psi? Oil weight/conventional/synthetic? Air filter/modified intake for a Focus ST? The rear spoiler I see people adding(It looks good!)? premium vs regular unleaded fuels(over a long period of time, not just a tank or two)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,547 Posts
I think this thread might be helpful to you.

http://www.fordescape.org/forum/mpg/63-real-world-2013-escape-gas-mileage-thread-began-9-11-12-a.html

It seems when it comes to the 2.0 Ecoboost it's all about the consistency of speed you're going, how fast you're going, and from my experience what kind of gas you get. I usually get a higher octane without any ethanol and I'm averaging 26-31 MPG going 70-75 MPG on the highway. That includes all the mods I have on my car and driving in "S" mode. As I wrote, I drove in "D" mode on the highway and came up with terrible MPG results. It felt as though my car was struggling because the gears were too short.

In spring I'm getting my car tuned so we'll see how that affects my MPG.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ditto and zebulon

·
Registered
Joined
·
518 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Nope, haha I've read through a lot of that thread. But about all that is is what people are getting. Nobody really discusses what they have tried(other than driving techniques and some fuel brands/octane) to improve or notice a difference. Nobody talked about changing tire sizes and getting a +/- or oil viscocity change(syn or conv). Or even the guys with the spoiler added on. Aero bits can have a major impact on hwy mpg. I was wondering if it did, or didn't.

You're getting 26-31 cruising 70-75? Sounds pretty good to me. 26 is a little lower than I would like but if thats 75mph there has to be a tradeoff to speed..and it's always mpg.

Did you ever notice any change while putting that stuff on your Escape? Or did you do it all at once? What size tires are you using on those ST rims? Also, what tires are you using?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,868 Posts
I spend some time on hypermiling forums. Below summarizes most of what I learned. I copied it over from the Focus forum so it might not be 100% real dnt as we already have these improvements. http://www.focusfanatics.com/forum/showthread.php?p=4892813#post4892813


A lot of people might equate hypermiling with driving 55mph in a 75 zone or pulse and glide, but a lot of modifications can have an effect without extreme effort. Most of what I’ve learned is from Ecomodder.com and through reading technical papers.

Chapter 1: Aerodynamics

Some Background. Aerodynamic drag is shown by the equation F = ½ p Cd A v^2

So drag increases with air pressure, coefficeient drag, cross sectional area, and velocity squared. A rule of thumb is that a 2% improvement in drag nets 1% improvement in MPG at hwy speed.

Major Aero Drag contributors, showing where we can make our improvments.
• 32% Wheels/wheelarches
• 30% rear end / wake
• 12% underfloor
• 10% skin friction
• 7% front end
• 6% Enginebay / cooling
• 3% mirrors

Theres no smoking gun for improvement, just a lot of things that add up. ie. i can get 12% MPG improvement and the car wouldn't look any different (example at bottom). Some of the effective mods are:

1. Remove roof rack –reduces vehicle cross section area, also reduces turbulence (improves Cd). Can get upto 10% MPG improvement (depending on how bad your rack was)
2. Remove antenna, remove spoilers, windshield wiper, shave door handles, etc. reduces Cd and A (small improvement)
3. Remove mudflaps. 1-2% MPG improvement
4. Remove side mirrors. (check your laws, but most area only need 2 rear view mirrors). Most people can remove the PS mirror no problem. Some remove the DS and put mirrors on the inside of the window. Upto 2% MPG improvement.

5. Narrow tires. Reduces cross sectional area.
6. Low rolling resistance LRR tires. Upto 4% improvement depending on tire.
7. Grill block – cooling systems are designed for worst case scenario, towing, uphill, 120degrees with the AC on. Many people find they can block upto 90% of their grill opening with no increase in coolant temperature or increased frequency of fan usage. It is more effective to leave the opening on the lower grill (closest to the stagnation point/highest pressure area). This also allows the engine to warm up faster. 3% MPG improvement. Of course the new foci already have grill shutters which do this.

8. Smooth front end. Cover up any other “holes” like recessed fog light, panel gaps, etc
9. Front air dam. Prevents air from going under the car where it is aerodynamically dirty. Make it only as low as the lowest part of the car hanging down. Upto 4% improvement.

10. Smooth underbody/belly pan. Most people use corrugated plastic “coroplast”. Its stiff and lightweight. Upto 3% MPG improvement for a full pan.

11. Front tire spats/ deflectors. These are the little flat deflectors just in front of the wheel. Upto 1% MPG

12. Smooth wheel covers. Full moon covers are good for 4% MPG improvement. Many people use pizza pans as a cheap alternative.

13. Wheel skirts. 3% MPG improvement each rear and front.

14. Lower the car. Reduces cross sectional area. Upto 2% MPG improvement per inch.
15. Rear Kamm back. If you build a roof extension following a specific aero template, you improve MPG by upto 4% (depending on length). You can approximate the shape by using a 15deg angle.

the template follows a specific shape.


16. Boat tail. If you follow the full template to the end you can gain as much as 15% MPG improvement and completely eliminate the wake drag. Although this is probably too extreme for most people



So, theoretically if I were to modify my car, and still keep it looking somewhat like a car, I would put wheel covers 4%, rear skirt 3%, grill block 3%, a few inches of air dam 2%, full undertray 3%, tire defelector 1%, lower 1” 2% and kamm back 4% for a total 22% improvement in fuel economy without even changing driving habits.

Or you could just do the stealth mods, grill block 3%, air dam 2%, full undertray 3%, tire deflectors 1%, lower 1” 2% and LRR tires 2% for a ~12% improvement in fuel economy.

Many of these improvements cost very little to implement and can save hundreds of dollars a year in fuel.

next i might touch on driving techniques.[/quote]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,868 Posts
Chapter 2: Driving

1. Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC). this is a measure of how efficiently the car turns gas into power. If you are lucky you can find one of these graphs for you engine. What the graph shows is engine load and rpm. We are looking for the area of minimal consumption.

2.0 L Zetec BSFC chart


a. On this zetec chart, there is an island of minimal fuel consumption (the 245 g/kWh line) at 80% of max load from 1500rpm to 3000rpm. So, for most economical acceleration, drive at 80% load (almost flooring it) and shift before 3000rpm.
b. The reason why 80% load is good is this: With the throttle closed there is a vacuum in the intake. It actually takes power to pump and compress the air from -20” vacuum upto atmospheric pressure. At wide open throttle, the intake is at atmospheric pressure as is the exhaust , there is a net zero pressure increase, so you don’t have that pumping loss across the engine. This is one reason why diesel engines are so efficient, as they have no throttle plate. But if you go over 80% load then the engine goes into open loop. Below approx. 80% stays in closed loop.

i. Open loop: the MAF sensor reads the air flow into engine, injects fuel to match. Good for power, bad for economy
ii. Closed loop: In conjunction with the MAF, feedback from the O2 sensors, weather lean or rich, adjusts the fuel flow for reduced fuel consumption and emissions.

c. What this chart also shows regardless of load, there is generally a minima around 2000rpm. So even at cruising speeds try to keep the rpm low, by shifting to a higher gear.
d. For advanced users, you could start thinking about changing your vehicle gearing, via tire diameter or actually changing gears, to get your car into that sweet spot for your target cruising speed (Ie. Your normal commute)

2. Shift points: The BSFC chart works best for manual transmimssions as you control load and rpm. But it can also help automatics. When accelerating, find the pedal position where the rpm are in the sweet spot around 2000-2500 rpm. Learn when your car upshifts, you want to get it into higher gear. Sometimes letting off the pedal a little with allow it to upshift.

3. Torque Convertor: you will also want to learn when your torque convertor locks up. When it does lock, the car behaves like a manual transmission with little loss in the drivetrain, but when unlocked, like during most acceleration and at low speeds, that fluid coupling is always slipping increasing your fuel consumption. Also when cruising, be very gentle on the gas pedal, I’ve found that quick pedal movement, although not enough to kick the tranny down a gear, may unlock the torque convertor for a bit.

4. Cruise Control: Good to use on flat terrain, but it actually increases consumption on hilly terrain because it does exactly the wrong thing. It tries to power up the hill, where the ideal is actually hold a constant engine load and to let the vehicle slow up the hill, then gain the speed back on the downhill.

5. Conserve momentum: The ultimate goal is to never hit the brakes. This means learning your route so you can time the lights and when you can coast to stop signs etcetera.

6. When you *have* to slow down, here's an approximate hierarchy of methods, from best to worst.

1) coasting in neutral, engine off (ie. roll to a stop);
2) coasting in neutral, engine idling;
3) regenerative coasting (hybrid vehicles)
4) regenerative braking (hybrid vehicles)
5) coasting in "deceleration fuel shut-off" mode (in gear, above a certain engine RPM)
6) conventional friction braking (non-hybrid or hybrid)​

Choosing the right method depends on traffic conditions (following vehicles) and how quickly you need to stop. Below are some explanations.

a. Coasting in Neutral: With the car in neutral, it coasts much further than in gear. Try it, you’d be surprised. Keeping the engine idling does use some gas, but it is not much. I’ve been doing this in my rental car for the past month and gained 7% MPG.
b. DFSO: If you coast in gear, you may hit DFSO Decel Fuel Shut off, but your coast distance will be lower as there is some engine braking, and you may not always meet the DFSO criteria (gear, rpm, load etc). If you know ahead of time you need to stop is better in the long run to just coast in neutral the last ¼ mile than to drive 1/8 mile and DFSO 1/8 mile because you will always benefit from the neutral coasting but may not meet the DFSO criteria. However if it is a more sudden and shorter stop try DFSO to save a few drops.
c. Engine off coasting. Better than keeping the engine on, but you lose power brakes, power steering, etc. Also there is some wear and tear from restarting the engine. If you’re serious about this you can wire up a kill switch that interrupts the injectors, coil, that will kill the engine, but keep you from turning the key and turning the electronics off and possible locking the steering.

7. Pulse and Glide. Based on the BSFC chart, the engine is most efficient while accelerating at 80% load at 2000 rpm. It also is very efficient at zero load, or turned off. Pulse and glide is a combo of these two. The best way to do it is to accel past your target speed, disengage the engine and coast down below your target speed, then accelerate again. It is best to keeping it the same gear and working in that 1500-3000rpm range. This technique may seem a bit extreme but it does work. You don’t have to turn the engine off to do this, just being in neutral is enough for some benefit. This P & G might happen every 20 seconds or so, but if you have made some aero modifications, your coasting distance would have increased greatly making the P&G less frequent.

8. Avoid Idling: when stopped at idle you get 0 MPG. So for any stops over ~15 seconds it would pay to shut the car off. This also includes not starting your engine at the beginning of a trip until everyone is seat with their belts on, mirrors adjusted, all ready, so you just start and go. Also don’t idle the car to warm it up. It is better to drive gently for the first few mile to warm the car up.

9. Maintenance: keep the car maintained, that’s all I’ll say

10. Alignment: a zero toe alignment will reduce tire side slip.

11. Tires: aside from getting LRR tires, or narrow tires, avoid low profile tires which generally have higher rolling resistance. The higher you put the air pressure the better. Many more extreme hypermiler run at the max tire pressure stated on the sidewall. Personally I find anything over 38psi is too rough ride. Also high pressures can cause accelerated wear on the centre of the tread, and may cause handling surprises. This can be good for a few % MPG increase.

12. Instrumentation & MPG meters : Scangauge, Ultragauge, MPGuino, vacuum gauge. These should be a chapter on their own, but I don’t know too much about them. Basically, they can read instant MPG, average MPG, can tell if you are in O2 open/close loop, lean burn, engine load etc…. These can all help fine tune the driver and learn which driving techniques actually reduce fuel consumption, rather than guess work.

There are lots of other tips out there.

Just read this for more car mods: Car MPG Efficiency Modifications Main - EcoModder

And read this for more driver mods:
100+ Hypermiling / ecodriving tips & tactics for better mpg - EcoModder.com
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
518 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Wow, that's a lot to take in. lol Interesting but I don't see doing any of that because what our Escapes don't have it the things that will make it look terrible. Still good to know.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,547 Posts
You're getting 26-31 cruising 70-75? Sounds pretty good to me. 26 is a little lower than I would like but if thats 75mph there has to be a tradeoff to speed..and it's always mpg.
As someone said on here before when manufacturers give MPG averages it's usually in a inside dyno somewhere going 60-65 MPH rather then the 70-75 I'm doing (which most are probably doing I would think). That's why the MPG averages are usually higher from the manufacturers then in real life. Not to mention weather changes and other things in life like slowly down and speeding up. Plus that 26 is is usually a very high 26 MPG. Last time it was 26.7 MPG which is huge even if a person is just going 50 miles.

Did you ever notice any change while putting that stuff on your Escape? Or did you do it all at once? What size tires are you using on those ST rims? Also, what tires are you using?
If by "change" you mean in the MPG department - not really...no. I thought it went down when I put in my sparkplugs but then my MPG started to average the same as it was before so maybe it was just a case of bad gas.

The stock ST rims have 235/35/18 tires on them. That left a pretty big fender gap between the tires and the rim so a member on here decided to try a 235/55/18 tire and it fit perfectly! I don't have the ST rims on now though. For now I just have the factory 17" inch rim with Gerneral Artic winter tires. Even with a change of tires from stock the MPG are still the same.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
377 Posts
I think this thread might be helpful to you.

http://www.fordescape.org/forum/mpg/63-real-world-2013-escape-gas-mileage-thread-began-9-11-12-a.html

It seems when it comes to the 2.0 Ecoboost it's all about the consistency of speed you're going, how fast you're going, and from my experience what kind of gas you get. I usually get a higher octane without any ethanol and I'm averaging 26-31 MPG going 70-75 MPG on the highway. That includes all the mods I have on my car and driving in "S" mode. As I wrote, I drove in "D" mode on the highway and came up with terrible MPG results. It felt as though my car was struggling because the gears were too short.

In spring I'm getting my car tuned so we'll see how that affects my MPG.
How do you get non-ethanol gas? round me all the gas has at least 5-10% ethanol
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,547 Posts
How do you get non-ethanol gas? round me all the gas has at least 5-10% ethanol
It is getting more and more rare but I found a Shell gas station where I live that sells 91 octane that is pure gas. I also found it in another city which I frequently visit and that is a Mobile gas station.

I don't know if all gas vs 5-10% ethanol makes a big difference but my Escape seems to like pure gas more. I don't think it's all in my head because I've done test and it always comes down to the same conclusion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Around here, west central Wisconsin, every gas station that I have been to has 100% gas in atleast 1 octane rating if not 2 ratings. Here 87 and 89 octane have 10% ethanol, but 91 and 93 octane is 100% gas. 91 and 93 usually cost $0.60-$0.80/gallon more than 87 or 89 with ethanol. I have not ran 91 or 93 oct in the Escape yet to see what the mileage difference versus the 87 or 89. But I do know that in my F150 running 91 or 93 (100% gas) is good for about 3mpg. I can pull down almost 20 mpg on a long road trip versus 17 mpg with 89 (10% ethanol), since my F150 4wd, bigger 5.4L V-8, has a small lift and runs 13" wide tires I was happy with 17 mpg but I was ecstatic with just a high under 20 mpg.

But with the $.60-.80/gallon up charge for 100% gas is doesn't make since is run it because it will actually cost you more to same distance compared to the lower octane fuels.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Hitokiri

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,547 Posts
Around here, west central Wisconsin, every gas station that I have been to has 100% gas in atleast 1 octane rating if not 2 ratings. Here 87 and 89 octane have 10% ethanol, but 91 and 93 octane is 100% gas. 91 and 93 usually cost $0.60-$0.80/gallon more than 87 or 89 with ethanol. I have not ran 91 or 93 oct in the Escape yet to see what the mileage difference versus the 87 or 89. But I do know that in my F150 running 91 or 93 (100% gas) is good for about 3mpg. I can pull down almost 20 mpg on a long road trip versus 17 mpg with 89 (10% ethanol), since my F150 4wd, bigger 5.4L V-8, has a small lift and runs 13" wide tires I was happy with 17 mpg but I was ecstatic with just a high under 20 mpg.

But with the $.60-.80/gallon up charge for 100% gas is doesn't make since is run it because it will actually cost you more to same distance compared to the lower octane fuels.
Awesome. Thanks for sharing your experience!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,868 Posts
its simple math.

ethanol has 30% less energy than gasoline.

a E10 blend (10% ethanol) mathematical has 3% less energy than 100% gas.

unfortunately for me, the extra cost of high octane with no ethanol will never be recovered via improved mpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
The ethanol/pure gas suggestion makes total sense, and I never thought of it. Of course something that contains less energy needs to burn more in order to make the same amount of power. Unfortunately, a cursory search around the internet didn't yield very many stations around Central Texas that sell ethanol-free gasoline. Bummer.

I was wondering about the turbo. Obviously, since my vehicle is new and under warranty, I wouldn't make any changes like this until after the warranty has expired, but I'm wondering if a larger turbo could actually help fuel economy, especially on the highway. The current setup is very responsive, which definitely contributes to the enjoyment of driving it. There isn't a lot of waiting to spool before the power is delivered. The boost is just a flick of the throttle away. What if it weren't? What if the turbo was larger (and actually capable of higher peak power numbers), and therefore wouldn't spool as quickly, which would allow casual acceleration at highway speeds to occur off-boost? Wouldn't the fuel economy under those conditions be more like a N/A 2.0L than FI? Or, is it that under load (as acceleration is), the difference would be negligible?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,868 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
518 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
The ethanol/pure gas suggestion makes total sense, and I never thought of it. Of course something that contains less energy needs to burn more in order to make the same amount of power. Unfortunately, a cursory search around the internet didn't yield very many stations around Central Texas that sell ethanol-free gasoline. Bummer.

I was wondering about the turbo. Obviously, since my vehicle is new and under warranty, I wouldn't make any changes like this until after the warranty has expired, but I'm wondering if a larger turbo could actually help fuel economy, especially on the highway. The current setup is very responsive, which definitely contributes to the enjoyment of driving it. There isn't a lot of waiting to spool before the power is delivered. The boost is just a flick of the throttle away. What if it weren't? What if the turbo was larger (and actually capable of higher peak power numbers), and therefore wouldn't spool as quickly, which would allow casual acceleration at highway speeds to occur off-boost? Wouldn't the fuel economy under those conditions be more like a N/A 2.0L than FI? Or, is it that under load (as acceleration is), the difference would be negligible?
I have thought of this EXACT thing! We actually could benefit from some turbo lag. One of the things with turbos is that when under boost they actually put more fuel than nessisary to cool things off as well. So it is kindof a double whammy when under boost.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
518 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
i might have found the 2.0EB BSFC chart.

from here http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/pdfs/merit_review_2011/adv_combustion/ace065_rinkevich_2011_o.pdf#23

it shows a broad region of efficient fuel usage (the island "I") from 2000 to almost 4000rpm from 50% to almost 90% torque (read as throttle position).

so this would show that brisk acceleration (enough to keep the rpm in teh sweet spot range) is most efficient.
This is really hard for me to understand.. It almost seems backward from keeping the rpm low and not under much stress.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,868 Posts
This is really hard for me to understand.. It almost seems backward from keeping the rpm low and not under much stress.
the best way i can describe it is like riding a bike.

if you pedal too slow, regardless if you can push harder it just doesnt work as well. there is a comfortable pedal speed somewhere in the middle of your abilities.

the bit about higher load is this:

it takes the same amount of energy to accelerate to a set speed regardless of how fast you do it. This is "work" you can measure it in watt hours Whr.
engines have different efficiencies in converting gasoline into work, the BSFC). this is measure in grams / kWhr. That island "I" is where the 2.0 ecoboost is most efficient. for most cars at higher throttle openings there is lower pumping losses.

Most often that graph has more contour lines, like the one for the focus engine a few posts up. where you can evaluate other loads and rpm.s however that was all i could find.

once you are up to your cruising speed, then you do want to keep rpm low and unstressed. Thats why you shift into the highest gear possible. It also explains why for most cars the best economy is when they just shift into top gear. For the 2.0 escape that seems to be about 55mph. 6th gear at 1500rpm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
377 Posts
I just filled up with high test 92 gas....just to see what it dose to the mpg
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top