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I didn't realize that a BSM reset was required when I did the replacement in my 2013 SEL 1,6. (I know, 20 lashes:)!) Forscan shows the battery as 2635 days in service when it is really only 375. My understanding is that the days in service can't be set to a specific value, only reset to zero. Now the question is whether it is better to reset it so the system thinks it is new or leave it thinking the battery is over 7 years old.

My inclination is to reset it as the 375 days of actual TIS is closer to 0 than to 2635. Any thoughts from the collective wisdom?
 

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My opinion is that I would reset the module. My reasoning is that a one year old battery should still be close to new in performance. 375 days is closer to 0 days than 2635 days. I had a similar problem with my new to me 2013 escape. When i bought it (from a Ford dealer but traded in and serviced at there Chrysler store, which included new tires brakes and a battery. ) The battery monitor was not reset and one thing I noticed while setting things up and learning to use the car, was that the accessories would shut down in no time. I checked the battery and could see the date stamp so I reset it and trickle charged the battery to be sure it was at full charge and reset the module. Now it works as it should.
 

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Supposedly the BMS can also work out the charge level/ health status of a battery by itself. IIRC some people have reported issues after fitting a new battery and not doing the reset, but if it was me I'd leave it alone as it's been working fine for over 12mths. I highly doubt it's going to suddenly cause any problems after that amount of time.
 

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Supposedly the BMS can also work out the charge level/ health status of a battery by itself. IIRC some people have reported issues after fitting a new battery and not doing the reset, but if it was me I'd leave it alone as it's been working fine for over 12mths. I highly doubt it's going to suddenly cause any problems after that amount of time.
Why then does the workshop manual say that it is a must do and cannot be done any other way?
 

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Why then does the workshop manual say that it is a must do and cannot be done any other way?
Yeah, I am also a little confused about the purpose of the BMS (Battery Monitoring System).
Is the only purpose of the reset, as the term suggests, to reset the 'mileage' if you like, of the new battery back to zero or do other gremlins appear if this is not done?
Surely accessories etc. would not shut down if the BMS was not reset because the computer 'thinks' the vehicle still has the old worn out battery?
If this is the case why the heck did Ford complicate things....was it to extricate more cash from us at their dealerships?

There are all sorts of opinions re this and if it was that important surely the owner's manual would mention it? It just describes what you should not do when connectiing accessories etc. but nothing about a BMS reset.
 

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Supposedly the BMS can also work out the charge level/ health status of a battery by itself. IIRC some people have reported issues after fitting a new battery and not doing the reset, but if it was me I'd leave it alone as it's been working fine for over 12mths. I highly doubt it's going to suddenly cause any problems after that amount of time.
Why then does the workshop manual say that it is a must do and cannot be done any other way?
Yeah, I am also a little confused about the purpose of the BMS (Battery Monitoring System).
Is the only purpose of the reset, as the term suggests, to reset the 'mileage' if you like, of the new battery back to zero or do other gremlins appear if this is not done?
Surely accessories etc. would not shut down if the BMS was not reset because the computer 'thinks' the vehicle still has the old worn out battery?
If this is the case why the heck did Ford complicate things....was it to extricate more cash from us at their dealerships?

There are all sorts of opinions re this and if it was that important surely the owner's manual would mention it? It just describes what you should not do when connectiing accessories etc. but nothing about a BMS reset.
WSM states that it must be done. If not charging system views battery as old and charges accordingly. Makes no mention that the algorithms can be learned over time. The warning is highlighted in the WSM and yes, no mentioned in owners manual. A Huge Ford FAIL in my opinion. Battery replacement has to be the second most common owner completed service.
 

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Supposedly the BMS can also work out the charge level/ health status of a battery by itself.
Once again (we've been through all of this here before) …..

The Battery Monitoring System does indeed determine the current (as in time) state of charge on an ongoing basis with no owner intervention. That monitoring of current state of charge is done during times of vehicle operation and during intervals of extended 'rest' (e.g. overnight) when the vehicle is inactive.

But, the System has no way of knowing the battery age without the active intervention of the BMS reset procedure. It cannot 'work that out' absent the owner telling the system when the battery is replaced via the active step of manual BMS reset using the scan tool (FORScan). The system is intentionally designed to not make any assumption / extrapolation about battery age even when the battery is disconnected for any period of time (e.g. out-of-vehicle vacation or winter storage).

All of those factors, among others, are employed in an algorithm to determine and control the overall Electrical Energy Management System / Smart Charging System strategies.

This is all explained in great detail in the WSM (Section 414-00 Charging System - System Operation and Component Description). FWIW, the following is a verbatim excerpt from that lengthy Section:

Battery Replacement

If the vehicle battery is replaced, it is very important to perform the battery monitoring system reset using the scan tool. If the battery monitoring system reset is not carried out, it holds the old battery parameters and time in service counter in memory. Additionally it tells the system the battery is in an aged state and the may limit the Electrical Energy Management system functions.

What are the exact consequences of failure to follow that instruction? Who knows …. ?

IF I were in the OP's position, I'd proceed to do the 'belated BMS reset' using FORScan ASAP.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I am not having any problems. If I were it would be an easy choice.:)

I would expect that the BMS can tell the state of charge and work out the health level of a battery within certain limits. It should not shut down any functions with the battery charge state at a high enough level and that determination should not be related to Time in Service (TIS).

However, battery age is an important factor in charge rate and system health determination.. Battery size is also an important piece of the equation. Despite the lack of clear direction (to be generous) in the owner's manual, I think that a BMS reset when replaced is a requirement for optimum battery life and performance. But that ship has passed for me.

My concern is that the BMS programming may be over or under charging the battery slightly based on its belief that the battery is 7 years old and has a higher sulfation level than a new battery. That may decrease the life of the new battery. At this point the question is whether using a new battery charge profile on a 1 year old battery is more or less damaging than using the charge profile for a 7 year old battery.

For anyone interested, here is the patent on the system: Ford BMS patent It tells, somewhat techncially, what the system is supposed to do but I expect that most readers here will get the general idea. Unfortunately only a Ford engineer with knowledge of the charging algorithims could answer the question definitively. and I'm guessing none has seen this post.

Thanks for the input everyone. I think I'll reset it and see how it goes. Worst case is I have to buy another battery and do the reset on a new battery and get everything back in sync.
 

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^ A sensible interpretation, conclusion, and plan of action, IMO ^ (y)

More FYI … that lengthy discussion in the Workshop Manual includes a description of a high-voltage rate of charge strategy that is employed only when the System determines battery sulfation is likely (i.e. a 'de-sulfation cycle'). It does not, however, explain exactly how, or what combination of parameters is used by the System to make the determination that strategy should be invoked at any moment in time.

I'd be willing to bet that the algorithm(s) for all of this Electrical Management strategy is one extraordinarily complex bear, and its relative sensitivity to the many different variables considered varies greatly.

Also willing to bet that the effect of belated reset will be impossible to sort from all of the other things that ultimately affect long-term battery life.
 

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^ A sensible interpretation, conclusion, and plan of action, IMO ^ (y)
<snip>
Also willing to bet that the effect of belated reset will be impossible to sort from all of the other things that ultimately affect long-term battery life.
Thanks for the confirmation. At least no one jumped up and said, "Don't do that!" with a good reason. I'm sure you're right about never really knowing.

Thanks again to everyone for their time.
 

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One thing no one has taken into consideration is the state of charge and the actual age of the new battery. Many batteries sit on a shelf for more time than you think, especially in low traffic areas. So my question is when you do reset the monitor what parameters is the system looking at. Many times we would get a battery delivered from a major chain parts store with an 80% charge. Personally when possible I always charge a new battery before instalation.
 

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One thing no one has taken into consideration is the state of charge and the actual age of the new battery. Many batteries sit on a shelf for more time than you think, especially in low traffic areas. So my question is when you do reset the monitor what parameters is the system looking at. Many times we would get a battery delivered from a major chain parts store with an 80% charge. Personally when possible I always charge a new battery before instalation.
Having replaced more than my share of batteries since my first car ('64 VW) I'm with you and I always charge a new one when I install it. I would think that the dealers do too and since the entire system is set up for dealers and not owners, the BMS would be programmed to expect a fully charged battery with a reset after installation.

I'm glad you brought this up. I hadn't thought of it and will charge the battery externally before I do the reset. That should get it closer to the 0 day state that the BMS is expecting.
 

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Why then does the workshop manual say that it is a must do and cannot be done any other way?
Yes, it says to do that. But we're talking about a battery that was installed over 12mths ago and is reported as operating perfectly fine. So why mess with something that's working perfectly? You could introduce a new problem by resetting the BMS- making it think the battery is brand new.

There are also settings in the BCM for battery size. So what if you've installed a battery that doesn't perfectly match the OEM battery? The BMS system needs to have some other smarts to cope with those situations. There is even variance between battery brands for CCA, internal resistance and Ah ratings for the same model battery.

If the vehicle battery is replaced, it is very important to perform the battery monitoring system reset using the scan tool. If the battery monitoring system reset is not carried out, it holds the old battery parameters and time in service counter in memory. Additionally it tells the system the battery is in an aged state and the may limit the Electrical Energy Management system functions.
In this case, that reset wasn't done when the battery was new. My response is only to this specific case. BTW at the end of that blurb in the WSM it says words to the effect of :

Load shedding may occur earlier than actually required if the battery is perceived as having a lower charge level.... This also effects the Smart Regenerative Charging system operation causing the battery to be maintained at a higher level of charge than the BCM thinks the battery is at, reducing fuel economy benefits.
So systems might start shutting down early (eg. when you turn the engine off you can get a warning and the Sync system will shut off quicker than normal.) It can also affect your fuel economy.

The Battery Monitoring System does indeed determine the current (as in time) state of charge on an ongoing basis with no owner intervention. That monitoring of current state of charge is done during times of vehicle operation and during intervals of extended 'rest' (e.g. overnight) when the vehicle is inactive.
The WSM says words to the effect of:

The BMS re-calibration is done when the rest period is greater than 3hrs and the current draw from the battery less than 100mA. That needs to be done every 7days. If the recalibration isn't done every 7 days the exact state of charge of the battery cannot be confirmed by the BMS.
So it does use other methods to determine the charge state of the battery.

The WSM kind of contradicts itself by saying the BMS won't know the battery charge state if the "re-calibration" isn't done every 7 days. So perhaps the reset when fitting a new battery isn't so critical?
 

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Yes, it says to do that. But we're talking about a battery that was installed over 12mths ago and is reported as operating perfectly fine. So why mess with something that's working perfectly? You could introduce a new problem by resetting the BMS- making it think the battery is brand new.

There are also settings in the BCM for battery size. So what if you've installed a battery that doesn't perfectly match the OEM battery? The BMS system needs to have some other smarts to cope with those situations. There is even variance between battery brands for CCA, internal resistance and Ah ratings for the same model battery.



In this case, that reset wasn't done when the battery was new. My response is only to this specific case. BTW at the end of that blurb in the WSM it says words to the effect of :



So systems might start shutting down early (eg. when you turn the engine off you can get a warning and the Sync system will shut off quicker than normal.) It can also affect your fuel economy.



The WSM says words to the effect of:



So it does use other methods to determine the charge state of the battery.

The WSM kind of contradicts itself by saying the BMS won't know the battery charge state if the "re-calibration" isn't done every 7 days. So perhaps the reset when fitting a new battery isn't so critical?
Personally, I would follow the procedures in the WSM for a variety of reasons. As others have noted, I would reset this battery after 12 months. The patent documents posted indicate that there is much more engineering and complexity in this system than I could ever hope to understand. Me, I am still trying to figure out diodes and why points and condensers went away😉. Finally, my dad was in automotive industry many years ago. The one truism that he left me with is that “if it was not needed it would not be there.”
 

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The WSM kind of contradicts itself by saying the BMS won't know the battery charge state if the "re-calibration" isn't done every 7 days.
IMO you're comingling several distinctly different parameters discussed in the WSM text:
  • initial state of charge ("During the drive cycle the Electrical Energy Management software will adjust the initial battery state of charge by monitoring the charge and discharge current and adjusting the state of charge up during charging, and down during discharge.")
  • state of charge calibration / accuracy ("During rest periods …. the battery voltage is sampled to calibrate the State of Charge ….. If the system draw does not allow the battery state of charge calibration over the previous 7 to 10 days the State of Charge quality factor will change to flag this and some Electrical Energy Management Functions which rely on the accuracy of the battery state of charge may be temporarily turned off until a calibration takes place.")
  • battery age (see previous post WSM quote)
Each of those different parameters is carefully distinguished with no 'kind of contradiction' in the text, IMO.

So perhaps the reset when fitting a new battery isn't so critical?
It's certainly fair to say that the WSM gives us little guidance about the relative criticality of the battery age parameter in the Electrical System Management strategy. Empirical evidence from this forum, including the OP's, certainly suggests that it's not 'critical' in the short-term; it's criticality in the long-term (e.g. relating to optimal ultimate battery life) is AFAIK, unknown to we mere mortals.
 

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There are also settings in the BCM for battery size. So what if you've installed a battery that doesn't perfectly match the OEM battery? The BMS system needs to have some other smarts to cope with those situations. There is even variance between battery brands for CCA, internal resistance and Ah ratings for the same model battery.
There are settings in the BMS for battery type and CCA capacity. If you install something other than an equivilent battery size and ttype (AGM instead of flooded, for example) then that parameter should be changed before you do the reset. IIRC changing that parameter forces a reset, which makes sense.

.Just to give this more background, I'm an electical engneer who has written the software for battery chargers. These were alarm system backup batteries, not automotive chargers, so the entire system operation profile is different and hence my search for the experience of others. But I do know how a diode works :geek:

Prior to hooking up my charger last night, I ran Forscan and looked at the other battery parameters, including charge state which was only 49%. This was about 14 hours after reasonable driving time. Not what I would have expected from a year old battery. Now my thought is that it isn't really being charged properly. Due to the received age of 7.2 years? No way to know as the detailed charging algorithims are the "secret sauce" of the BMS and not something disclosed in the patent.

Another possi bility is that it isn't right is because of this:
The BMS re-calibration is done when the rest period is greater than 3hrs and the current draw from the battery less than 100mA. That needs to be done every 7days. If the recalibration isn't done every 7 days the exact state of charge of the battery cannot be confirmed by the BMS.
This would be the point at which the system determines the float level voltage of the battery which is important to the charge state. If too much current is being drawn then it isn't really the float level but a discharging state. It is the sytem eqivilent of us putting a voltmeter on the battery to see if it is charged, 12.6 or more is a good charged battery level. Then it probably turns on some device to cause a known discharge and sees if the voltage drops too much, which would indicate a lack of capacity. Just like we would put a battery load tester on it. Just my guess, but that is logical.

Since I park in my garage I don't lock the car. I also have a cell charger that is always plugged into the outlet unless I"m going away for a long period and that has an LED that is always on. That probably draws 20ma on its own and along with the other items that are always on the discharge may never be less than 100ma.and the system may never recalibrate.

I have learned a great deal about this from everyone's posts. Not having a WSM I had no idea about these BMS factors and I very much appreciate the quality and detail level of this discussion. Now I know to remove the cell charger and lock the acr at least one night a week. It also explains why the radio/My Touch didn't come on a couple of times before I changed the battery. I figured it was a system glitch (it is a Microsoft product) since it came on after I shut down and restarted. I hadn't had any battery issues - except for when my grandson would play in the car and turn on all the lights, switches, seat heaters, etc. .I neeeded a jump start after that. and I decdied that the battery was over 6 years old so that is what prompted the replacement.

This has now become a more involved project as I've decided that I need to check the electrollyte level before I do anything else.That low charge state may be due to overcharging for a year and the level could be low. We all know how easy getting to the batttery is in this vehicle. :mad: Tomorrow's project.
 

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There are settings in the BMS for battery type and CCA capacity. If you install something other than an equivilent battery size and ttype (AGM instead of flooded, for example) then that parameter should be changed before you do the reset. IIRC changing that parameter forces a reset, which makes sense.

.Just to give this more background, I'm an electical engneer who has written the software for battery chargers. These were alarm system backup batteries, not automotive chargers, so the entire system operation profile is different and hence my search for the experience of others. But I do know how a diode works :geek:

Prior to hooking up my charger last night, I ran Forscan and looked at the other battery parameters, including charge state which was only 49%. This was about 14 hours after reasonable driving time. Not what I would have expected from a year old battery. Now my thought is that it isn't really being charged properly. Due to the received age of 7.2 years? No way to know as the detailed charging algorithims are the "secret sauce" of the BMS and not something disclosed in the patent.

Another possi bility is that it isn't right is because of this:


This would be the point at which the system determines the float level voltage of the battery which is important to the charge state. If too much current is being drawn then it isn't really the float level but a discharging state. It is the sytem eqivilent of us putting a voltmeter on the battery to see if it is charged, 12.6 or more is a good charged battery level. Then it probably turns on some device to cause a known discharge and sees if the voltage drops too much, which would indicate a lack of capacity. Just like we would put a battery load tester on it. Just my guess, but that is logical.

Since I park in my garage I don't lock the car. I also have a cell charger that is always plugged into the outlet unless I"m going away for a long period and that has an LED that is always on. That probably draws 20ma on its own and along with the other items that are always on the discharge may never be less than 100ma.and the system may never recalibrate.

I have learned a great deal about this from everyone's posts. Not having a WSM I had no idea about these BMS factors and I very much appreciate the quality and detail level of this discussion. Now I know to remove the cell charger and lock the acr at least one night a week. It also explains why the radio/My Touch didn't come on a couple of times before I changed the battery. I figured it was a system glitch (it is a Microsoft product) since it came on after I shut down and restarted. I hadn't had any battery issues - except for when my grandson would play in the car and turn on all the lights, switches, seat heaters, etc. .I neeeded a jump start after that. and I decdied that the battery was over 6 years old so that is what prompted the replacement.

This has now become a more involved project as I've decided that I need to check the electrollyte level before I do anything else.That low charge state may be due to overcharging for a year and the level could be low. We all know how easy getting to the batttery is in this vehicle. :mad: Tomorrow's project.
Good luck with your project and please be sure to report back. We all learn from this sort of thing. My guess is that your battery MAY be undercharged due to the fact that it is perceived as an "old" battery and has been charged accordingly. The WSM actually speaks to this issue, "additionally it tells the system is in an aged state and may limit Electrical Management System Functions".
 

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As I said in an early post, my 2013 escape when purchased had a new battery and was not reset. If i would be in the car without the engine operating and turn on the radio system (Sony) either using the push button in accessories, or even just pushing the on button of the entertainment system, After a very short time, matter of minutes, a message would come on shutting down to conserve battery. After 2 amp charge for 8 hours or so and monitor reset I don't have that issue any more. the radio will play during my wife's grocery shopping without starting the engine.
I am estimating the battery was about 6 months prior installation. I have checked the battery with an old Ford battery tester one of the three step testers. When I first bought the car it said good battery cranking amps were higher than rated but needs charged. Now a few months post reset it still reads higher than rated cranking amps but the charge is now OK I might add I am retired and the Escape often sits 7 to 10 days without use and then may only be driven a few miles stop and restart and stop. Once in a while it will get a 40 mile total two way trip to my Son's restaurant half highway half 35 MPH driving. Probably some of worst driving that could be done to the poor thing over-all.
I feel that the reset was absolutely the correct thing to do.
 

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Update time.

I had a schedule change for this morning so I had time to pull the cowl and get to the battery. Unfortunately, although the battery seemed to have removeable cell covers it was sealed so that was a total waste of time. Not much though as I'm getting really good at it now. 😊

Having charged the battery last night and letting it sit this morning, I decided to do the reset. Here is the before resest BMS state in Forscan.
75948


The ignition had been on with Forscan running for a while before I did this but note the Battery State Charge % is 75%

After the reset, these are the readings:
75949


The charge has gone from 75% to 84% in 30 seconds with only a change in battery age. That seems to indicate that it has a significant impact on the system's determination of charge state.

I will drive it for a few days, locking it and pulling the cell charger at night, then do another Forscan reading and report back in a week or so.

Till then thanks again for everyione's time and input. I hope whatever holiday you celebrate you have a good one.
 

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That is a very interesting find. It's amazing that the state of charge would change 10% with a reset. I wish I would have looked into all that info Before I reset my Escape. I have probably 7 battery tenders, maintainers on cars trucks and machinery for the winter. I think out of curiosity after the holidays I am going to purchase a stand alone monitor to see the state of charge on these batteries and the escape and make a comparison. I know that for example in hybrids the max battery state of charge is 55% supposedly for longevity. VERY INTERESTING to say the least.
 
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