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Tools/parts needed: 10 mm crescent wrench, 10 mm & 13 mm sockets/wrench, replacement battery (see discussion for size) and a cold beer

Approximate time required: 30 min

Quick discussion about batteries: All of the 2013 Escapes come standard with a size 96R battery. It's one of the smallest batteries (in terms of cranking amps, reserve capacity, & weight) that you can get [I'm referencing the Duracell Automotive Battery spec sheet - these are the batteries sold at Sam's club].



In other words, the stock battery sucks. I assume Ford was saving some money with the 96R battery, but the good news is that the battery tray can accept a larger battery without any cutting, drilling, or any other permanent modifications. And who doesn't want more cranking amps and reserve capacity? Especially if you run a lot of accessories (remote start, tow, lights etc.)

So how big can I go?? The simple answer is that a size 94R (H7) fits without any trouble. See the pictures below for the relative size comparison. I'm using an AGM battery, but a normal flooded battery should fit just the same.




Battery removal/replacement:

1. Turn off the car and and prop the hood open. Locate the battery cover and air intake which houses the air filter. Remove the battery cover and disconnect the positive wire using a 10 mm wrench. Pop open the air intake as if you were replacing the air filter, but don't remove the air filter. Just disconnect the wire plugged in at the top and move the cover to the left so it's out of the way. (The plug is easily removed by pushing the red plastic piece back with your finger nail about a quarter inch, then pull the entire plug backwards.)



With the air intake out of the way, you should be able to access the 4 black plastic plugs (green arrows in the picture). Pull all four of these plugs out. Now you should be able to lift the front cover of the battery tray about 1 inch so that it has some free movement. With the cover lifted up about 1 inch, you should be able to access the two wires that are attached on the bottom left of the cover (red arrows in the picture). Use a 10 mm socket and a 13 mm socket to remove the nuts and then slide the wires off. I've already removed the 10 mm nut in the picture below. Don't drop the 13 mm nut; it's not attached to the wire like the 10 mm one!



Now you should be able to move the battery tray front cover out the way to the right like this:



Before we can move the battery, we need to loosen the clamp holding it down. Remove the two nuts that are holding the metal clamp (green arrows in pciture). The bar can then be lifted off the bolts.



Pull the battery forward and lift it over the edge of the tray. Don't worry, the negative wire should be long enough, but keep an eye on the small wire plugged into the negative terminal (green arrow in picture). Don't put excessive tension on this small wire. Now you should have enough room to use your hand to unplug the small wire from the side of the negative terminal. With the small wire out of the way, the battery should come forward all the way, and you can use a 10 mm wrench to remove the negative terminal.





Remove the old battery from the vehicle.

The empty battery tray should look like this. Note the two plastic adapters that Ford added to accommodate the smaller battery (green arrows). Remove both of these plastic pieces. The rear piece easily pops out by hand. The piece in the front needs to be gently pried upwards.




Congratulations! Now your Ford Escape can accept a "real" battery.



Now get your replacement battery and essentially reverse the process. If you are using the larger 94R (H7) size battery, you may need to remove the handles if it has any so that the metal battery clamp can fit nicely in the center groove. I've included more pictures below of the new battery being installed.







Now that you're finished, you can relax and enjoy the cold beer.
 

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Nice write up. When the time comes to do a replacement, I will be getting a larger battery for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
What about this? Looks like you need the ford scan tool to go in and do a Battery Monitoring System Reset. Very nice write up! Pictures are a lot more work, but worth a thousand keystrokes.

Escape City - Ford Escape Forums - Ford Escape, Mercury Mariner, Mazda Tribute, Ford Maverick - View topic - Alternator Not Charging 2013+ Here's Why
I just checked the system voltage during start-up with my scan gauge and it looks like the battery is charging like normal. The voltage was around 14.3 for about 1 minute after starting, then dropped to 12.5. If you watch the video that was linked, the guys battery/alternator does the exact same thing (and he already reset the battery age to zero). I will point out; however, that my old battery and the new battery were both fully charged.

Thanks for the info. I will continue keep an eye on the battery charge and report back if I get any problems.
 

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Alphapart, welcome to the forum and thanks for detailed write up. When the time comes, I'll go for the larger battery for sure. Here's what I found in the shop manual about battery installation.

Installation

1. To install, reverse the removal procedure.
2. If installing a new battery, use the scan tool to carry out the Battery Monitoring System (BMS) reset after the battery is connected.

So, unfortunately, BMS reset is required.
 

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Reading the workshop manual some more. Learn something new everyday.
Section 414-00
Charging System - System Operation and Component Description
Component Description

Battery Monitoring Sensor

NOTICE: Unless the battery is being replaced, DO NOT reset the battery monitoring system using the diagnostic scan tool. This reset is reserved for new battery installation only. This reset will clear the learned battery data, the battery time in service, and will affect the aging algorithm parameters, which have been learned since the installation of the battery.

The battery monitoring sensor is integrated with the negative battery terminal clamp and cable assembly, which provides a ground to the sensor. The battery monitoring sensor measures voltage, current, and temperature of the battery and uses these inputs to calculate the battery condition. The sensor transmits this information through the LIN circuit to the BCM . The battery monitoring sensor has a 2-pin connector providing battery voltage and LIN connections.

The battery monitoring sensor is an input to the Electrical Energy Management software. If the sensor malfunctions due to wiring issues or failure, a DTC sets. In most cases the Electrical Energy Management functions are turned off until the sensor operation is restored.
Shop manual also talks about charging and jump starting the vehicle. Basically, it tells you to connect the negatives to the car, not the battery pole because BMS needs to know everything regarding charging and discharging state of the battery.
 

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very nice detailed write up thank you. size wise. I thought I had a small 12 v battery in my 28 fords stock battery box this one is smaller yet.
 

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Great write up.

I am a bit annoyed at how complicated these cars have become to do basic maintenance. It does seem unbelievable that changing a battery requires a dealer service call. I can understand that the computer might need to know that a battery has been replaced, but really, a service call? There should be a way for the owner to do this.
 

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sadly it will as the body control module holds battery faults till cleared as I just found out.
If only the BCM (or other unit) would include a small backup battery to maintain 12v in the system to hold all the vehicle's user-defined settings (saved radio stations, paired cellphones, etc.) during the time that the main 12v supply was missing while the battery was being replaced...
 

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If only the BCM (or other unit) would include a small backup battery to maintain 12v in the system to hold all the vehicle's user-defined settings (saved radio stations, paired cellphones, etc.) during the time that the main 12v supply was missing while the battery was being replaced...
They make a tool to do this, or if you have jumper you can connect it to the battery cables or someplace like a PowerPoint that has power when the car is off.
Mark
 

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I wonder if all Escapes come with the smaller battery? The OP has a 2.5L so if you ordered a Titanium with a 2.0L ecoboost maybe it already has the larger battery for the larger demand.
Mark
 

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They make a tool to do this, or if you have jumper you can connect it to the battery cables or someplace like a PowerPoint that has power when the car is off.
Mark
Right - in the past I have used jumper clip leads from my electronics workbench to connect in a "hold-up" battery (one time, I even used just a 9V transistor-radio battery jumpered with an in-line fuse and a diode across the main battery cables) - but all that sometimes got a little "messy" ...
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Reading the workshop manual some more. Learn something new everyday.
Shop manual also talks about charging and jump starting the vehicle. Basically, it tells you to connect the negatives to the car, not the battery pole because BMS needs to know everything regarding charging and discharging state of the battery.
Thanks for the shop manual info. I will ask my dealer to reset the battery information next time I'm over there. So far, I'm not having any issues.
 

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Needing to perform a reset with a Ford specific scanner, just to change a battery?
Another way for dealers to make money.
Seems as if the car makers despise DIY'er like me - disgusting!!

For God's sake, it is a simple battery change, something anyone can do in their driveway in a few minutes - now you need a dealer for that too!!!
 

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I wonder if they use the smaller battery to lighten the car, I see where the 94R is 15 pounds heavier than the 96R. Gotta meet those EPA numbers.
 
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