2013+ Ford Escape Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Any one using these plugs? NGK RUTHENIUM HX - Projected Square Platinum Electrode (PSPE®)

LSPI has become a growing concern with direct injected turbocharged engines and has been know to destroy engines.
We have SN+ oil which is designed to help prevent low speed pre-ignition.
Perhaps these NGK PSPE plugs could provide some additional insurance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,114 Posts
Are you actually experiencing low speed pre-ignition (pinging) with your Ford Escape?
It is unusual but if so just replace your current plugs with colder rated ones and you should only need to do that if you have done some mods.

If you do not have a pre-ignition problem don't worry about it as the current plugs are obviously selected by Ford for that particular engine.
The link you refer to is fine but just about every spark plug manufacturer puts out a similar blurb.
It's the old adage in my view....'if it ain't broke don't fix it'. :p
 

·
Registered
2019 Honda Ridgeline RTL-E AWD
Joined
·
5,340 Posts
Your Escape has sensors and PCM controls to preclude harmful pre-ignition as long as you are running gas within the recommended octane rating and you haven't modified your engine. If you're actually suffering harmful pre-ignition then you've likely got a problem that a plug-swap won't cure and competent diagnosis is called for.

Pre-ignition damage / failure among '13+ Escapes is essentially unheard of. That's with hundreds of thousands of units on the road with millions of accumulated miles. OE plugs are a proven reliable performer at a reasonable cost.

It's a cut-throat world out there and manufacturers of all sorts of car parts / products (and their advertising departments / agencies) are driven to come up with all sorts of products with associated hype to try to make money (take yours).

Don't fall for marketing hype, don't reward and cost-participate in that advertising machine.

IMO
 

·
Super Moderator
2016 Kuga Titanium 2.0l EcoBoost
Joined
·
2,664 Posts
LSPI has become a growing concern with direct injected turbocharged engines and has been know to destroy engines.
We have SN+ oil which is designed to help prevent low speed pre-ignition.
Perhaps these NGK PSPE plugs could provide some additional insurance.
Have a read of this LSPI: Low-Speed Pre-Ignition - DSPORT Magazine there's a list of recommendations on how to avoid LSPI. Note changing the spark plugs is not on the list.

First thing on the list : "Do not subject the engine to high loads at low engines speeds"- you can help reduce that by driving with the transmission in "S" instead of "D"; further down the list "Use the highest octane fuel available"- something else that's easy to do. They also talk about mods to reduce the intake air and coolant temps, plus reducing oil vapour entering the inlet (ie. use an oil catch can- there's lots of discussion on them in other threads.) Also mentioned is the SN+ oil you're already using, out of interest, does that meet the Ford specs in the owner's manual?

Changing the sparks plugs is often done on modified turbo engines to help reduce detonation. That's a different problem to LSPI.
 
  • Like
Reactions: chrisgb and wiz043

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,114 Posts
Yep...LSPI is almost always due to not using high enough octane fuel.
My Japanese imported 1997 Toyota MR2 suffered badly from LSPI before 98 octane fuel was available in Australia and we later discovered the car was tuned for 100 octane fuel used in Japan at the time.
The Toyota dealer of the day even replaced the ECU under warranty to no avail and they could not find the problem until they experimented with 100 octane airplane fuel which completely eliminated LSPI..?

Once the 98 octane fuel became available in OZ around year 2000/01 the problem was solved.
Later on I put colder rated spark plugs in it but only because I had done other mods.

Further to what @murcod said re our Escapes, I am trying to get into the habit of always selecting Sport mode as normal auto tends to result in the car engaging 6th (or 8th) quite early causing stress on the engine under acceleration on slight inclines etc. unless you physically kick it down a gear. Sport mode usually retains a lower gear under these situations.
 

·
Super Moderator
2016 Kuga Titanium 2.0l EcoBoost
Joined
·
2,664 Posts
I am trying to get into the habit of always selecting Sport mode
That's an easy one- move the shifter all the way down until it stops. No need to even check the dash readout. ;)

The detonation with your MR2 would be normal detonation- from increased boost, relatively low octane fuels and hot weather. LSPI is related to newer GTDI engines and manufacturers trying to achieve extreme fuel economy with high gearing and high boost levels at low revs. Old fashioned turbo engines didn't develop much boost before about 3000RPM, peaking at 6000RPM plus. These days they're developing high boost levels at extremely low revs- some capable of reaching peak boost not far off idle. Boost levels are a lot higher and engine compression ratios for turbo engines are very high compared to 20 years ago.
 
  • Like
Reactions: wiz043

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,114 Posts
That's an easy one- move the shifter all the way down until it stops. No need to even check the dash readout. ;)

The detonation with your MR2 would be normal detonation- from increased boost, relatively low octane fuels and hot weather. LSPI is related to newer GTDI engines and manufacturers trying to achieve extreme fuel economy with high gearing and high boost levels at low revs. Old fashioned turbo engines didn't develop much boost before about 3000RPM, peaking at 6000RPM plus. These days they're developing high boost levels at extremely low revs- some capable of reaching peak boost not far off idle. Boost levels are a lot higher and engine compression ratios for turbo engines are very high compared to 20 years ago.
Ha-ha...I tend to do that now, the hard part is getting SWNB to do the same as she drives a lot of short trip to the shops etc. I am still trying to get her to regulate her braking to save brake pads. Like some women (he says bravely) it is 'last second' braking at roundabouts, downhill runs and stop signs etc. :p

Also, my MR2 wasn't a turbo but had a high compression ratio, around 10.5 to 1 from memory. Most later n/a SW20 factory models from 1996 to 1999 had the LSPI drama going on til 98 octane fuel was introduced.

There were turbo MR2's here in Oz also from 1990 to around 1996 but they were grey imports.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I replaced the original plugs in my 13 2.0L Escape at about 98,000 mi. with these, carefully gapped to 0.032" and have not had any problems. (The original plugs seemed to be in OK shape, but the gaps measured almost 0.040".) The replies on this forum have reassured me that I need not worry about LSPI. Thank you all !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
932 Posts
I replaced the original plugs in my 13 2.0L Escape at about 98,000 mi. with these, carefully gapped to 0.032" and have not had any problems. (The original plugs seemed to be in OK shape, but the gaps measured almost 0.040".) The replies on this forum have reassured me that I need not worry about LSPI. Thank you all !
Very Good choice..How does it feel now, pick -up,smoother?? NGK just came out with a new design for turbo engines too..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
KY.BORN, I did not notice any additional MPG, idle or smoothness improvements. However, I now feel comfortable with my choice of plugs (at the time there was no special plugs for turbo engines), and these plugs serve well for the remaining life of the vehicle.
 

·
Super Moderator
2016 Kuga Titanium 2.0l EcoBoost
Joined
·
2,664 Posts
They make some interesting claims on those spark plugs regarding acceleration. (I'd like to see that test repeated by an external company that has no vested interest.)
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top