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guess i will try another Cable and see if that one works. Seems unlikley. Not sure HO wi would test the harnesses?
 

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My 2016 Titanium is at Long-Lewis Ford right now waiting on parts from Memphis. The service advisor sent me these part numbers: battery cable is part no. AV6Z-10C679-P (OEM part is -BF); pigtail connector is part no. DU2Z-14S411-AZA (aka WPT-1396). He said the parts total around $100 but he quoted $443 for the whole job. If you can replace these parts yourself, you can definitely save some money. This is what the original part looks like on a four-year-old car.

DSCN4629.JPG
 

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This is what the original part looks like on a four-year-old car.
Not all four-year-old cars.

That corrosion on a negative terminal / cable is the combined effect of hydrogen gas, atmospheric air, an unprotected terminal, and is exacerbated by an undercharged / near end-of-life / damaged battery. All of the same factors apply to the positive terminal except that overcharging is the exacerbating condition.
  • All flooded-cell batteries generate hydrogen gas which is vented to the atmosphere (true AGM batteries are not flooded-cell and do not have a vent); that alone is enough to promote corrosion, particularly if the battery has a cover which restricts dispersion of that gas.
  • It's not terribly uncommon for batteries to suffer damage to the seal where the post(s) penetrate the plastic case, allowing both hydrogen gas and sometimes even the liquid acid solution to leak from the case at that point (making terminal corrosion very likely); inspection for dampness around the post can reveal that (battery replacement is the cure when that happens).
  • A liberal coating of generic bearing grease, covering all metal surfaces of the terminal and cable-end, can go a long way toward preventing corrosion by isolating the metal from surrounding atmosphere; it may be a bit messy but IME is longer lasting and more effective than so-called 'battery terminal protection sprays'.
  • Pushing a battery to it's absolute end-of-life increases the potential for an ongoing undercharged condition, exacerbating the tendency for negative terminal corrosion.
A bit of preventive maintenance will allow battery terminals to remain 'as good as new' for many, many years, avoiding consequential issues / costs along the way. BTDT, I've never had significant corrosion (nip-it when first observed) or had to replace an OE battery terminal / cable on any vehicle I've ever owned, all of them over 4-years old (including my Escape), many of them decades old.

Just FYI.
 

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"Preventative maintenance" I am with you 100% on that.
But I wish Ford would grease up at the factory. Especially after they made it hard to get to the negative terminal.
 
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