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Discussion Starter #1
My ex took my 2013 2.0 escape into the dealership for some maintenance, they were supposed to have changed the oil but they didn't, so long story short I'm preparing for an engine swap.
Any tips on what to and what not to do would be greatly appreciated!
 

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Just to lengthen your short story a little are you saying your current engine has failed to the extent that you need another engine because the dealership failed to change the oil?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yes the engine has failed because the oil wasn't changed, I have no way of proving the dealership was 100% responsible. So I am Going to swap the engine.
 

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Sorry bud but failure to perform an oil change on schedule will not destroy an engine. It won't even mildly damage it, so your missing a major part of the story here.
 

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Now along the lines of your original question, since you don't perform your own oil changes, I'm going to assume your not very mechanically inclined. My advice would be to take it to the dealer or a trusted mechanic and have them do the swap for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The car has been to a certified mechanic, it has a ruined turbo and timing chain to say the least. The mechanic quoted me 5k in parts and labor, the engine is ruined. I am looking for tips or tricks on an engine swap, not other people's opinions of my mechanical abilities.
Thanks
 

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Well your mechanical abilities is rather important. This isn't changing your spark plugs here. You need a significant amount of tools, a sheltered work space, a very clean environment so you don't contaminate any internal part, the time to dedicate to this since it won't happen in one afternoon, and an engine hoist is a most. It's very important to stay vary organised and I can't stress this one enough. Every bolt and nut has to be kept track of and it's very important to know what wires go where. Replace any and all seals that are tampered with during this operation whether or not they still look good. You don't want to get all done only to find out something is leaking and have to tear everything apart again. In general with a used engine it's also a good idea to replace any of the higher wear parts like the water pump and serpentine belt while you have easy access.

If you've done an engine job in the past or at least will be working with someone who has, you know this already, but I don't want you going into this blindly since if you fail and have to take it to the shop anyways, their price will climb quickly once they have to clean up someone else's mess. To be honest, unless your a highly skilled mechanic with dedicated facilities, I'd still have the pros do the work.
 

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Tip: First, buy this; accept no substitutes.

Trick: When you get it, before you touch a wrench, go to section 303-01B "2.0L EcoBoost Engine Removal", start reading and follow every related hyperlinked section from there; follow through for the complete removal and reinstallation procedures in every detail. Then, with that 'schooling' and 'dry-run-on-paper' behind you, and only then, pick up the wrenches and do the project if still so inclined.

Absolutely serious, not being a smart ass, it'll prove to be worth much, much more than the purchase price and advance study/preparation time for your project.

Good Luck.
 
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