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Curious to find out how many using this Forum have had their 1.5l engine replaced by Ford under terms of the Ford Warranty. Put as many details as you can...IE: miles/months owned before it occured...diagnosis(coolant in cyl, cracks, warped block/head...etc)....how long it was in the shop...anything you'd like about your experience, and also if you kept your Escape or went with a diiferent vehicle.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Curious to find out how many using this Forum have had their 1.5l engine replaced by Ford under terms of the Ford Warranty. Put as many details as you can...IE: miles/months owned before it occured...diagnosis(coolant in cyl, cracks, warped block/head...etc)....how long it was in the shop...anything you'd like about your experience, and also if you kept your Escape or went with a diiferent vehicle.
I'll start it off...We bought ours in Feb 2019....its a 2018 with 25,000 miles when we got it. Now has 28,000 and has been at the dealer for 3 weeks waiting for its long block to be replaced. Ours was coolant leak in cyl #1....warped top of block......initially showed as a misfire.
 

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I'll start it off...We bought ours in Feb 2019....its a 2018 with 25,000 miles when we got it. Now has 28,000 and has been at the dealer for 3 weeks waiting for its long block to be replaced. Ours was coolant leak in cyl #1....warped top of block......initially showed as a misfire.
We bought our 2018 Escape SEL in Feb 2018 brand new off the dealer lot. I was excited to find it at my preferred Ford dealership and it was loaded with many goodies and had the premium wheels that I liked. A little more than a year later in March of 2019 with 22K miles on the odometer the CEL came on. I pulled a P302 code (misfire on #2). Thinking it was a simple coil pack replacement, I made a waiting service appointment. It only took them about an hour to diagnosis the issue as coolant leaking into #2 cylinder. Upon pulling the heads and then the entire engine from the car, they found defects in the block. The engine had to be replaced. Short blocks are on back order so a long block was ordered. The whole process took about two weeks before getting the car back. My local Ford service team did a great job in finding the cause quickly and not jerking me around for several weeks with unnecessary ignition component replacements. The install is very clean and looks original. There were several false misfires after the install that required additional PCM updates to correct but it's been running fine since. Still, I do not trust the new engine to be any more reliable than the original and will be trading my Escape for a new Edge ST.
 

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We bought our 2018 Escape SEL in Feb 2018 brand new off the dealer lot. I was excited to find it at my preferred Ford dealership and it was loaded with many goodies and had the premium wheels that I liked. A little more than a year later in March of 2019 with 22K miles on the odometer the CEL came on. I pulled a P302 code (misfire on #2). Thinking it was a simple coil pack replacement, I made a waiting service appointment. It only took them about an hour to diagnosis the issue as coolant leaking into #2 cylinder. Upon pulling the heads and then the entire engine from the car, they found defects in the block. The engine had to be replaced. Short blocks are on back order so a long block was ordered. The whole process took about two weeks before getting the car back. My local Ford service team did a great job in finding the cause quickly and not jerking me around for several weeks with unnecessary ignition component replacements. The install is very clean and looks original. There were several false misfires after the install that required additional PCM updates to correct but it's been running fine since. Still, I do not trust the new engine to be any more reliable than the original and will be trading my Escape for a new Edge ST.
Any idea just what "the defects in the block" were? May be useful in speculating if this is an engine design problem or a manufacturing problem. Either way, I am glad Ford did the right thing and hope you get many miles out of the new engine.
 

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Any idea just what "the defects in the block" were? May be useful in speculating if this is an engine design problem or a manufacturing problem. Either way, I am glad Ford did the right thing and hope you get many miles out of the new engine.
Machined service of the block was out of spec around #2. No idea if it's a manufacturing defect or something that developed over time due to the boosted power/heat. You can see my service reports here:
I will be driving it to my Ford dealer this weekend and returning home in a new Edge ST in its place.
 

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Our 2018 Escape with 27,000 miles had a #2 cylinder antifreeze leak. Now needs a new engine. They said up to 4 months. Gave us a Focus to use until then. We need to come in every 2 weeks to renew the loaner. Fun fun. I saw that there may be 40,000 with this problem. That's why they are so backed up.
 

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While I don't have an Escape, I do have a 2016 Fusion SE with this motor. I also had the Cylinder 2 misfire code and low coolant, but I haven't been told either way if its the defect a lot of people are experiencing; sure seems like it has all the signs though. My dealer has 4 Escapes ahead of me for the 'heavy tech', which I believe means they are getting new blocks/motors. I am 16 days into it now, but they did give me a brand new Escape to drive until it gets resolved (has the 1.5L Eco of course). What is unique to my situation is that my Fusion has 87K miles on it, and this is the first issue I have seen. Luckily I bought the Ford Premium ESP. Will update my info as I go along as well. Sandia Man - where did you read about the possible 40,000 with this problem?
 

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These have been posted before and are a good illustration of the design differences between the two engines. (I am pretty sure the 1.5 has the same design). As a former owner of a 2013 1.6 Escape, I am glad I traded up to the 2.0 engine. There is a specific name for the design of the 1.5 but I cannot recall it.
ecoboost2.0combustionchamber.jpg
 

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These have been posted before and are a good illustration of the design differences between the two engines. (I am pretty sure the 1.5 has the same design).
Except every review of the 1.5L I've read says its design was updated from the 1.6L; that Ford "learned" from the mistakes/cooling issues inherit to the 1.6L. Who's lying, or did Ford create a new problem in the design of the 1.5L?
 

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While I don't have an Escape, I do have a 2016 Fusion SE with this motor. I also had the Cylinder 2 misfire code and low coolant, but I haven't been told either way if its the defect a lot of people are experiencing; sure seems like it has all the signs though. My dealer has 4 Escapes ahead of me for the 'heavy tech', which I believe means they are getting new blocks/motors. I am 16 days into it now, but they did give me a brand new Escape to drive until it gets resolved (has the 1.5L Eco of course). What is unique to my situation is that my Fusion has 87K miles on it, and this is the first issue I have seen. Luckily I bought the Ford Premium ESP. Will update my info as I go along as well. Sandia Man - where did you read about the possible 40,000 with this problem?
I just saw it on line. They just called today and said maybe the end of June for us. We live in Albuquerque.
Curious to find out how many using this Forum have had their 1.5l engine replaced by Ford under terms of the Ford Warranty. Put as many details as you can...IE: miles/months owned before it occured...diagnosis(coolant in cyl, cracks, warped block/head...etc)....how long it was in the shop...anything you'd like about your experience, and also if you kept your Escape or went with a diiferent vehicle.
We have a 2018 Escape with 27,000 miles. It had a antifreeze leak in the 2nd cylinder, now needs a new engine. It has been in the shop 2 weeks. They said today that maybe we will get it back the end of June. He also said that it may take 4 months.
 

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Except every review of the 1.5L I've read says its design was updated from the 1.6L; that Ford "learned" from the mistakes/cooling issues inherit to the 1.6L. Who's lying, or did Ford create a new problem in the design of the 1.5L?
I had not heard that. Interesting. I had assumed that the 1.5 was the same basic design (free standing cylinders) as the 1.6. Would be interesting to get a picture of the block of the 1.5. I further assumed that the 1.5 was the same basic design as somewhere on this board I read that the displacement was reduced to meet Chinese import restrictions.
In any event, my feeling is that the safety(fudge factors) inherent in the 1.6 are not as forgiving as the 2.0. Just my opinion.
 

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here are pics of my 1.5l that was removed from my Escape....issue was with #1 cylinder....which is at the bottom of picture
Based on the angles of those photos, I'm not seeing much difference between the 1.5L & the 1.6L.
 

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here are pics of my 1.5l that was removed from my Escape....issue was with #1 cylinder....which is at the bottom of picture
Thank you. From my perspective, this does look like the same basic design as the 1.6. I had that engine in my 2013 but traded it in for a 2018 with the 2.0.
 

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Based on the angles of those photos, I'm not seeing much difference between the 1.5L & the 1.6L.
are you talking about open deck or closed deck?
Yes, I THINK, "open deck" was the name but not sure. If you look at the difference between the 1.6 and 2.0, it seems to me that the "support" of the cylinders is significantly more in the 2.0. My understanding is that this was done to promote extra cooling. My "THEORY" ONLY" is that the reduced support made the design more susceptible to mis-machining. ie. the design is less forgiving. If things are not machined just right and the head is not torqued just right, there can be problems. My theory only.
 

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Yes, I THINK, "open deck" was the name but not sure. If you look at the difference between the 1.6 and 2.0, it seems to me that the "support" of the cylinders is significantly more in the 2.0. My understanding is that this was done to promote extra cooling. My "THEORY" ONLY" is that the reduced support made the design more susceptible to mis-machining. ie. the design is less forgiving. If things are not machined just right and the head is not torqued just right, there can be problems. My theory only.
So, according to this engine discussion, both the 1.5L & 1.6L share the open deck design. I would agree with the theory that the room for error is much smaller. At least from what I've seen on these forums so far, it seems like Ford solved the overheating issues. It seems like manufacturing sloppiness is behind these issues we're seeing now. I'm still surprised to not see more 2017s with the issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
For what its worth, my tech, who has worked on Fords for 40 years, says , he thinks the issue is in the block casting procedure, not gaskets or head misalignments, but the process at the foundry or wherever the block is poured and not in the design or assembly of these engines. Now who knows when/where these new engines were made and if these will still have the same issue. It would be interesting to see a comparison of build dates for these to compare if it was a particular time frame involved. We had a Subaru Legacy 2.5l non-turbo. Those engines were used in several models and it was found by Subaru that the oil rings on the pistons were not made to spec. A deficiency from their ring provder. It involved 1,000s of vehicles. Those engines had an oil consumption issue which later was corrected by Subaru by replacing those rings, which involved a re-build or a new engine. It took a while for Subaru to admit it though.
 

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So, according to this engine discussion, both the 1.5L & 1.6L share the open deck design. I would agree with the theory that the room for error is much smaller. At least from what I've seen on these forums so far, it seems like Ford solved the overheating issues. It seems like manufacturing sloppiness is behind these issues we're seeing now. I'm still surprised to not see more 2017s with the issue.
Yes, I agree but what we have to remember is there are likely many vehicles out there with the 1.5 or 1.6 that have no problems. some folksa posing here have that engine with 100,000 miles and no engine problems. How many folks post to forums like this to tell the world that "all is well and they do not need any advice or have any problems? Bottom line is that forums like this are VERY useful but inherently biased towards problems by design IMHO.
 
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