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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,

I'm new to the Forum here but not to Escapes. I owned a 2001 V6 XLT and drove it for 5 years or so, I never had anything go wrong with it.

I have a couple teens, the oldest is starting to drive and the youngest will be eventually. Buying a newer car you get more safety features, like blind spot warning and forward collision system. My thought is to buy a 2013-2015 escape now and drive it for a while, letting the kids learn on it. Eventually I'll just give it to the youngest.

If I buy a used one with around $80k miles now, by the time they inherit it the car should be around 110-120k miles. Maybe more?

It's still a little pricey for a young adult's car, but in the long run it seems like it should work out.

What's the confidence on these cars into the higher miles, 200k plus? Is one engine turning out to be more reliable than others?

Thanks for any help here.
 

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Hey all,

I'm new to the Forum here but not to Escapes. I owned a 2001 V6 XLT and drove it for 5 years or so, I never had anything go wrong with it.

I have a couple teens, the oldest is starting to drive and the youngest will be eventually. Buying a newer car you get more safety features, like blind spot warning and forward collision system. My thought is to buy a 2013-2015 escape now and drive it for a while, letting the kids learn on it. Eventually I'll just give it to the youngest.

If I buy a used one with around $80k miles now, by the time they inherit it the car should be around 110-120k miles. Maybe more?

It's still a little pricey for a young adult's car, but in the long run it seems like it should work out.

What's the confidence on these cars into the higher miles, 200k plus? Is one engine turning out to be more reliable than others?

Thanks for any help here.
Welcome. I would consider the 2.0 engine in the 2013 and avoid the 1.6. Search on coolant loss and such to satisfy yourself. I have had several Escapes beginning with the 2010. Also, the 2013 and now the 3016 and 2018.
 

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Buying a newer car you get more safety features, like blind spot warning and forward collision system. My thought is to buy a 2013-2015 escape ....
Just be aware that in those years forward collision warning was not available on the Escape. Look at the NHTSA website for safety ratings and what options are required to achieve those ratings for different years.

Personally, for 200k+ miles I'd avoid the 1.6 and later 1.5 Ecoboost; in fact I'd avoid any turbocharged engine. Not saying they can't go that long, many have, just saying that I wouldn't bet on it for best economics if I knew up-front that was the service horizon I were aiming for. YMMV. The only non-turbo engine in the Escape lineup is the 2.5L non-ecoboost and it's only available on the basic "S" trim.

In the Escape lineup this presents a forced compromise situation IMO .... the most mechanically simple drivetrain (and therefore IMO reliable for the very long-term, which IMO 200k+ miles is these days) is only available on the basic "S" trim; but the basic "S" trim lacks availability of many of the safety-related options/systems required to earn certain Escapes a reasonably high (4+ star) NHTSA safety rating. So, you gotta pick your priorities / risks.

Good Luck with your shopping and Good Luck with your teen drivers (no shortage of challenges on both of those fronts!)

:)

PS - You may find the 'Order Guides" for older year-models useful in your research (to see what drivetrains and options are available for each year and trim). Those can be found at this post. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks, that's good advice. I have been using the NHTSA site but admittedly I don't know the features on each trim level of the Escapes yet. I still need to do some research and come up with a good compromise.

It's been my experience that all of the manufacturers reserve the safety features on the highest trim levels. My guess is, it just works that way until the government mandates something.

Thanks,
Greg.
 

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We have a nationwide fleet of 2.5 escapes at my work, hundreds of them. They are the base model S trim FWD models but we all put tons of miles on them and mechanically they are much less complicated than the eco boost versions albeit without the fancy bells and whistles the nicer trims have. Ive had 3 of them over the past 8 years and am about due for a new 2020 to be assigned to me this spring although they now come with the 1.5 3 cylinder eco boost. Never had any engine or mechanical problems on mine besides one bad throttle body that was replaced under warranty. Just fleet schedule maintenance, tires, brakes when needed and oil changes every 7500 miles. Thats about it.
 
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