2013+ Ford Escape Forum banner
21 - 40 of 45 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
691 Posts
The OP is asking asbout extending warranty on a used. Some of you chimed in about not taking it on a new. For the latter, next time you're at the dealership ask for some quotes on replacing the electronics (like the infotainment system for example) out of pocket and then tell me what a bad idea you think extending the warranty on your new is. :rolleyes:
I had no idea the ESP price was negotiable when I bought my '17 SE a little over a year ago.

It was after I'd signed the papers and wrote the check that the salesman shuffled me off to talk to the sales manager and they gave me the pitch for the ESP. Knowing that the cars these days are horrendously expensive in case of electronic problems (hard to diagnose, expensive parts), and I was still under my budget for the new car, so I just signed on the bottom line and wrote another check.

OT side story: I had the extended warranty on my previous car, BMW X3, and the salesman called me before it expired and recommended that I do a full brake job before it expired. There was no deductible on that plan so OK, why not! Unlike most cars, BMW covered everything including consumables (lights and wipers, brakes, but not tires) on their warranties. But of course, you effectively pay for it up front in the high cost of the car.
Even after the extended warranty expired, the BMW always offered a loaner when needed. But that bonus was a dealer specific benefit. Until 8 years of ownership, the loaner was a new BMW, after that, an Enterprise car.
Once the BMW didn't pass inspection., the dealer had my car for a week. No mechanical/electrical problems - computer glitch. I had a new 335 TDi for a week while they tried to figure it out. Wow! What torque and great mileage on that car. Reprogrammed the car's computer several times until they got it to pass inspection, then I had to take it through the State inspection again (I could have paid the dealer to do it since they were an authorized inspection station).
I suspect that Ford dealers as generous, not even donuts and coffee at my local dealer. VW and BMW always had these in their waiting areas.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,205 Posts
I got the ESP only because I was able to get it at the large discounted prices. If I had to pay retail I would pass. One reason to get it when new is you get a rental allowance if it needs repair under the factory warranty. Some dealers may offer a loaner car regardless, or maybe only if you bought the car from them.
You have the option for first day rental and enhanced rental. If you use it just once it is worth both the options, the basic rental does not even cover an economy rental by me 100%.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
263 Posts
Scare tactics. Warranties are sold because they are a profit machine for the dealer and the company offering the warranty. That doesn't make them a bad deal any more than going to the casino is a bad financial move. Sure, you COULD come out ahead, but statistically the house is going to win in the end. If the peace of mind that comes with the extended warranty is worthwhile, you should get one. I would sooner buy a vehicle I wasn't afraid of breaking than spring for the warranty though.

But ya never know, lots of folks have made out on extended warranties. As Dirty Harry would put it, "Do ya feel lucky? ;)
I used to agree with you on this until they started loading modern autos with so many electronic which are not only insanely expensive to replace but especially in the case of touch screen technology, also have a high failure rate and a short life span. I have yet to own a single smartphone or tablet that made it more than a few years of regular use without having to buy another because they either failed completely or ended up too glitchy to stand anymore. If I don't end up with the ESP paying for itself because of electronics failure in a couple more years I'll eat my shorts
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
I used to agree with you on this until they started loading modern autos with so many electronic which are not only insanely expensive to replace but especially in the case of touch screen technology, also have a high failure rate and a short life span. I have yet to own a single smartphone or tablet that made it more than a few years of regular use without having to buy another because they either failed completely or ended up too glitchy to stand anymore. If I don't end up with the ESP paying for itself because of electronics failure in a couple more years I'll eat my shorts
Over hundreds of thousands of cars, even the most discounted ESP would have you eating those shorts more times than not. It is a numbers game that favors "The House". BTW, Ford pays for those repairs not the dealer. The dealer makes the profit on the sale of the ESP. There is a very slight chance that the number crunchers at Ford did not do their homework the night they set the cost to the dealer (using actuarial rates). But that chance is very slim.

You are correct that there are a lot of electronics that can be costly to replace with new. Not to mention drivetrain parts. Bear in mind that Ford does not agree to replace with new, only fix broken parts. That means they could replace with a refurbished device if they choose to. Beyond the cost of the part, often the shop labor is as costly, if not more, than the part being replaced. The repair costs can sometimes end up being very high.

I just replaced the radiator on a Mazda (I know, it is not an Escape). I have done this many times in the past on other cars. This is the first time that involved having to remove the entire front bumper/and lighting to get to the radiator. My point is that modern cars are not designed for minimizing repair hours.

That being said, I did purchase an on-line Ford ESP on a new-to-me Escape. I have been repairing my autos for over 45 years. I have rebuilt engines, replaced front sub-frames, replaced transaxles, half-shafts, wheel bearings, power steering racks, timing belts and cylinder heads. I have rebuilt calipers, cut out frame sections, replaced in-tank fuel pumps. I have even built my own vehicle from pieces of steel tube. I am capable. I simply choose not to do so anymore. The ESP will prevent me from being tempted to save money in the future.

When going thru the actual numbers, over a large number of vehicles, the ESP will cost more than paying for the repairs out of pocket. How much more, depends on how good a deal one finds in purchasing that ESP. Having the ESP will also help manage a budget if the unlikely failure does happen.

I can also say from personal knowledge, that the quality of electronic parts in today's cars are much higher than the average Apple or Android phone. Comparing anticipated product life should not be made.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
263 Posts
Over hundreds of thousands of cars, even the most discounted ESP would have you eating those shorts more times than not. It is a numbers game that favors "The House". BTW, Ford pays for those repairs not the dealer. The dealer makes the profit on the sale of the ESP. There is a very slight chance that the number crunchers at Ford did not do their homework the night they set the cost to the dealer (using actuarial rates). But that chance is very slim.

You are correct that there are a lot of electronics that can be costly to replace with new. Not to mention drivetrain parts. Bear in mind that Ford does not agree to replace with new, only fix broken parts. That means they could replace with a refurbished device if they choose to. Beyond the cost of the part, often the shop labor is as costly, if not more, than the part being replaced. The repair costs can sometimes end up being very high.

I just replaced the radiator on a Mazda (I know, it is not an Escape). I have done this many times in the past on other cars. This is the first time that involved having to remove the entire front bumper/and lighting to get to the radiator. My point is that modern cars are not designed for minimizing repair hours.

That being said, I did purchase an on-line Ford ESP on a new-to-me Escape. I have been repairing my autos for over 45 years. I have rebuilt engines, replaced front sub-frames, replaced transaxles, half-shafts, wheel bearings, power steering racks, timing belts and cylinder heads. I have rebuilt calipers, cut out frame sections, replaced in-tank fuel pumps. I have even built my own vehicle from pieces of steel tube. I am capable. I simply choose not to do so anymore. The ESP will prevent me from being tempted to save money in the future.

When going thru the actual numbers, over a large number of vehicles, the ESP will cost more than paying for the repairs out of pocket. How much more, depends on how good a deal one finds in purchasing that ESP. Having the ESP will also help manage a budget if the unlikely failure does happen.

I can also say from personal knowledge, that the quality of electronic parts in today's cars are much higher than the average Apple or Android phone. Comparing anticipated product life should not be made.
The part I put in bold print above is what raised my eyebrows, what are you drawing this conclusion from? RE: refurbished replacements, when this happens where I am, that repair is also warrantied from date of install. So let's say in year 3 of my 5 years I end up with a refurb infotainment system warrantied for a year. Still good. I've played that game with OEM's and mostly came out on top. Let's not lose sight that we're talking purely about just the electronics replacements paying for the ESP themselves let alone all the mechanical issues on top of that.

RE: cost of ESP causing me to eat my shorts - I paid $2k Canadian for 160,000km which is slightly over 5 years of my driving. That's from the dealer not 3rd party. Historically speaking for myself I'll easily claim more warranty fixes than that over 5 years. In fact I've already had to fix a roof leak and broken windshield trim in just the first year which if I had paid out of pocket around here for an independent garage would've been $80/hour on labour alone. so in one year I've paid I'm guessing about $259 on just labour no parts. Over 5 years if that average continues would be $1250 on labour alone out of the $2000 I spent on ESP, not parts, on really basic simple repairs on a new vehicle. As it ages and more serious issues arise you can see where I'm going with this. If I were to estimate, I'm betting I could've spent twice what I did on the ESP and still broke even.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
The part I put in bold print above is what raised my eyebrows, what are you drawing this conclusion from? RE: refurbished replacements, when this happens where I am, that repair is also warrantied from date of install. So let's say in year 3 of my 5 years I end up with a refurb infotainment system warrantied for a year. Still good. I've played that game with OEM's and mostly came out on top. Let's not lose sight that we're talking purely about just the electronics replacements paying for the ESP themselves let alone all the mechanical issues on top of that.

RE: cost of ESP causing me to eat my shorts - I paid $2k Canadian for 160,000km which is slightly over 5 years of my driving. That's from the dealer not 3rd party. Historically speaking for myself I'll easily claim more warranty fixes than that over 5 years. In fact I've already had to fix a roof leak and broken windshield trim in just the first year which if I had paid out of pocket around here for an independent garage would've been $80/hour on labour alone. so in one year I've paid I'm guessing about $259 on just labour no parts. Over 5 years if that average continues would be $1250 on labour alone out of the $2000 I spent on ESP, not parts, on really basic simple repairs on a new vehicle. As it ages and more serious issues arise you can see where I'm going with this. If I were to estimate, I'm betting I could've spent twice what I did on the ESP and still broke even.
I am currently retired but when I worked (up until the end of last year, I worked in the electronics component industry/ We manufactured components and sold to a large number of cell mfgrs and automotive customers. I am familiar with the automotive requirements as well as cellular phone mfgrs' requirements. Meeting automotive requirements are tougher. Some cell phone mfgrs have tough requirements but IMO, not as tough as the automotive customers.

It is very hard to single out electronic vs powertrain claims since the warranty covers both with one payment. I might be able too compare similar esp plan costs to see how much the electronic coverage might be. But it is not worth my time.

I never meant to say that in 1 or 2, or even 5 (or even more) cases, that the Ford ESP would not be worth the money to the individual. What I did say is that over many customers, that Ford wins out on the majority of them. That may mean 50.5% of the time. I suspect that the dealers always win as they wouldn't sell for less than their cost. Unless it was to make a vehicle sale (Which I have had done for me many years ago),
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,205 Posts
...
In fact I've already had to fix a roof leak and broken windshield trim in just the first year which if I had paid out of pocket around here for an independent garage would've been $80/hour on labour alone. so in one year I've paid I'm guessing about $259 on just labour no parts. Over 5 years if that average continues would be $1250 on labour alone out of the $2000 I spent on ESP, not parts, on really basic simple repairs on a new vehicle. As it ages and more serious issues arise you can see where I'm going with this. If I were to estimate, I'm betting I could've spent twice what I did on the ESP and still broke even.
FYI that would be not covered under the Ford ESP, at least the ones in the US.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Discussion Starter · #30 ·
How can I find this Lombard coupon code? I have looked on the lombard site & used our friend Google but a no go so far.
Thanks.
I recommend simply calling Lombard Ford Warranty and they can give you the coupon over the phone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
I want to get the Premiumcare ESP from Ford for my wife's 2018 Titanium I bought used a year ago. The 3 year, 36K mile warranty runs out this November.

Only about 9800 miles on the vehicle. I have had 2 other Escapes, both 2013 models and have bought the extended warranty for 1 of them, which I traded in on this Titanium.

The ESP I bought was from Troy Ford. Over the past few days I've been looking on line and have not been able to access their website to check their prices for the Premiumcare warranty. I keep getting a HTTP error 404.

This is from both my saved website and from Google search. Has anyone recently purchased a ESP from them or have they gone out of business?

I have found prices from Ziegler and Flood Ford. Are there any other dealers on line you can recommend.

Any help would be appreciated.
 

·
Super Moderator
2017 Escape Titanium 2.0l Ecoboost
Joined
·
1,195 Posts
You could price check with Lombard Ford.
 

·
Administrator
2014 Ford Escape Titanium, 2.0L, Sync 2 MFT
Joined
·
6,076 Posts
I want to get the Premiumcare ESP from Ford for my wife's 2018 Titanium I bought used a year ago. The 3 year, 36K mile warranty runs out this November.

Only about 9800 miles on the vehicle. I have had 2 other Escapes, both 2013 models and have bought the extended warranty for 1 of them, which I traded in on this Titanium.

The ESP I bought was from Troy Ford. Over the past few days I've been looking on line and have not been able to access their website to check their prices for the Premiumcare warranty. I keep getting a HTTP error 404.

This is from both my saved website and from Google search. Has anyone recently purchased a ESP from them or have they gone out of business?

I have found prices from Ziegler and Flood Ford. Are there any other dealers on line you can recommend.

Any help would be appreciated.
I merged your thread with this existing thread. There are also other threads on extended warranty, if you do a search.
 

·
Registered
2020 Ford Escape Titanium Hybrid
Joined
·
15 Posts
I got the Ford ESP on my two former Focus Titanium hatchbacks. IIRC, for car #1 all of the repairs it went through was under the original 3/36, so at trade-in time it had not been touched, the dealer gave me a prorated report. On the second hatch, at least one of the repairs fell under the ESP, also got the prorated refund at trade-in time. Right after we bought those two cars the whole drama about the DPS6 dual clutch transmission unfolded, which was a huge relief for us since we were absolutely covered and would not have to be at Ford's mercy until the cars had hit the 7 year mark. That's $1500 or worse per incident if you aren't covered and you can't convince Ford that your car falls under their warranty extensions for the DPS6. So yea, when we got the two Escapes we went ahead and picked up ESP again. I have had previous cars where a single repair cost me more than what it cost to add the ESP to either of the Escapes, so I am at peace with it.
 

·
Registered
2019 Ford Escape Titanium
Joined
·
11 Posts
Hi All,
I am looking to get Ford’s ESP. Extended Service Plan.
Can I get this if I bought a Certified Used Vehicle? I have a 2019 Escape Titanium Model.
Can Iget this at my local Ford Dealer? The prices I am seeing are way more reasonable then the 8K after market warranty I was proposed from Suburban Ford Used Cars in SH Mi.
‘Thanks in advance!;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I am new to the forum and also the new owner of a used 2017 Escape Titanium, 2.0L turbo with 56,618 miles on the odometer. The original warranty has of course expired and I am now considering a Ford Extended Service Plan. For those of you that have purchased an ESP, which plan did you go with and to what extent have you used it and did you find it a good value?
TIA,
Wild Skies
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,023 Posts
Most common seems to be purchased online from Flood Ford and Zeigler Ford.

Search on here. You'll find lots of discussion, pro and con, regarding Ford ESP.

The pro side boils down to peace-of-mind regarding a potential big-ticket item on increasingly complex, costly-to-repair vehicles.

The con side is the generally universal recommendation that you find online: best to just set aside the money and don't buy an extended warranty. You most likely will not need it.

Basically it's a crap shoot. I may sound like I'm being negative on ESPs, but I'm not. I have one on my '14.

I bought an 8/125 ESP through Flood when I bought my '14 used after 6 months in service and 12,000 miles. I haven't used it.

We didn't get one on my wife's '12 that she got new. She's had two A/C condensers and the fuel pump replaced. I have also replaced the horns twice. The cost of these items are still probably been less than the ESP cost.

As I said, I am not being negative, though it sounds like I am. I have a 2022 Escape Titanium on order. I plan on keeping it for a while and will most likely get an ESP for the aforementioned peace-of-mind.

Neighbors in NC bought an ESP for the used Escape they purchased at Flood Ford. They used to live in RI where Flood is located. It is for their daughter in college. She needs a vehicle because she is a nursing student and needs a vehicle for rotations this year. They bought it so they know her car is covered while she is away. There's that peace-of-mind thing again. :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: SymChris
21 - 40 of 45 Posts
Top