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Nope, "Poor" is definitely not "Good". Ford's got some improvement work cut out for themselves it seems.

Thanks for linking that. Though far from perfect IMHO IIHS crash-test data is a useful consumer resource and manufacturer incentive, glad they do it.
 

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Nope, "Poor" is definitely not "Good". Ford's got some improvement work cut out for themselves it seems.

Thanks for linking that. Though far from perfect IMHO IIHS crash-test data is a useful consumer resource and manufacturer incentive, glad they do it.
Not good news for the wife as she's the one that's always on the passenger side. Guess I'll have to try and hit everyone head on :D.
 

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This must be a new testing protocal correct? The reason I ask is that the window stickers for both of my Escapes show 4 stars (out of 5) for both driver and passenger. Also Side crash is 5 out of 5, and rollover is 4 out of 5.
Yes, the passenger side small-overlap is a new protocol for IIHS.

But please note too, the 'star ratings' on a window sticker are from NHTSA tests, different from IIHS. Another useful resource but not exactly comparable (google can provide info on both rating systems of course).

;)
 

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Yes, the passenger side small-overlap is a new protocol for IIHS.

But please note too, the 'star ratings' on a window sticker are from NHTSA tests, different from IIHS. Another useful resource but not exactly comparable (google can provide info on both rating systems of course).

;)
Always appreciate reading your posts because I pretty much always learn something.
 

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Yes, the passenger side small-overlap is a new protocol for IIHS.

But please note too, the 'star ratings' on a window sticker are from NHTSA tests, different from IIHS. Another useful resource but not exactly comparable (google can provide info on both rating systems of course).

;)
I'm not too worried. There are some who consider the IIHS as just another industry special interest group with an axe to grind. Not necessarily me, of course. ;)
 

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I'm not too worried. There are some who consider the IIHS as just another industry special interest group with an axe to grind. Not necessarily me, of course. ;)
Oooo-Kaaay.

About the Institutes | IIHS

Everyone's entitled to an opinion. Pass the salt, please. :D
 

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Oooo-Kaaay.

About the Institutes | IIHS

Everyone's entitled to an opinion. Pass the salt, please. :D
My guess is that all vehicles are engineered to a mix of regulatory/manufacuter standards. This would include crash testing. Centex do you know if ford designs to the NTSHA standards or other???
 

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.... do you know if ford designs to the NTSHA standards or other???
I don't think that either NHTSA or IIHS crash ratings constitute "standards" in a literal sense.

As I understand it, IIHS as a non-regulatory non-profit organization conducts data collection, testing and educational efforts aimed at improving vehicle and roadway safety through a process of awareness (and perhaps lobbying regulators ??) . I'm not aware that they publish "standards" per se.

NHTSA on the other hand is a government agency tasked specifically with, among other things, development of rules having the force of law on vehicle manufacturers. Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards are within NHTSA's purview, for example, and must be complied with by all vehicles sold in the US; those are literal manufacturing "standards".

I don't know that NHTSA's 'crash ratings' carry the force of law or "standards". I'm not sure that manufacturers are required to achieve a particular NHTSA crash rating, but I think not - I think that NHTSA crash ratings are intended for consumer (and manufacturer) information purposes (in that regard similar to IIHS crash ratings).

I suspect that all manufacturers seek to earn good ratings on both systems, simply because both are widely publicized de facto indicators of vehicle safety that have some sway on consumer choices .... good ratings, both NHTSA and IIHS, make for good marketing. And perhaps smarter consumerism.

IMHO
 

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I don't think that either NHTSA or IIHS crash ratings constitute "standards" in a literal sense.

As I understand it, IIHS as a non-regulatory non-profit organization conducts data collection, testing and educational efforts aimed at improving vehicle and roadway safety through a process of awareness (and perhaps lobbying regulators ??) . I'm not aware that they publish "standards" per se.

NHTSA on the other hand is a government agency tasked specifically with, among other things, development of rules having the force of law on vehicle manufacturers. Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards are within NHTSA's purview, for example, and must be complied with by all vehicles sold in the US; those are literal manufacturing "standards".

I don't know that NHTSA's 'crash ratings', on the other hand, carry the force of law or "standards". I'm not sure that manufacturers are required to achieve a particular NHTSA crash rating, but I think not - I think that NHTSA crash ratings are intended for consumer (and manufacturer) information purposes (in that regard similar to IIHS crash ratings).

I suspect that all manufacturers seek to earn good ratings on both systems, simply because both are widely publicized de facto indicators of vehicle safety that have some sway on consumer choices .... good ratings, both NHTSA and IIHS, make for good marketing. And perhaps smarter consumerism.

IMHO
Concur. Particularly with your last sentence. It was what I intended to say. Standards is a bit strong but might apply to some things like fleet fuel economy as well as others that I am not aware of.
 

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This bit is probably the most important as it suggests some improvement in reprogramming the triggering of the SRS system would improve the scores:

According to IIHS, side-curtain airbags did not deploy during tests of both the Outlander Sport and the Escape, which may have been a factor in both vehicles’ scores.
“If these vehicles aren’t designed specifically with the passenger small overlap test in mind, the restraint systems may not be tuned to deploy when they need to in a crash,” Mueller said.
I don't know what the Mustang scores in US tests, but here it infamously scored a paltry 2 stars! There were issues with the timing of the airbags and the scores also take into account electronic safety aids fitted eg. active city stop, BLIS etc. Ford Mustang scores concerning 2 star safety rating | ANCAP

The Ford Mustang rating is limited to 2 stars due to its poor performance in three of the four areas of assessment – Adult Occupant Protection, Child Occupant Protection and Safety Assist. The poorest performing area of assessment was Safety Assist with the Mustang scoring 2 points out of a possible 12 points (16%).
You really need to closely examine the scores with the latest ratings, a vehicle could do well in crash tests but get an overall dismal result due to not having many electronic "Safety Assist" devices fitted. (Not relevant to the IIHS offset result.)
 

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2018 Ford Escape failed passenger side crash test

Hmmm.

2018 Ford Escape
https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/cars/2018/04/04/ford-escape-rated-poor-iihs-crash-tests-7-smaller-suvs/479857002/

The 2013-2016 Escapes also received a Poor Small Overlap Front: Driver-Side rating. According to the IIHS, Ford didn’t add the same reinforcements to the passenger side that it did to the driver side. Because the Escape has not changed substantially on the passenger side since 2013, the “Poor” rating on the small overlap front passenger-side test applies to model years 2013 to 2018.
Starting with 2017 Escape models, Ford reinforced the structure on the driver side to improve occupant protection in a small overlap front crash, but didn't make the same change to the passenger side, researchers noted. Escape earned an acceptable rating in the driver-side small overlap front test.

The 2017 Escape did earn a 5 star NHTSA rating.
https://www.nhtsa.gov/vehicle/2017/FORD/ESCAPE/SUV/FWD
 

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Hmmm.

2018 Ford Escape
https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/cars/2018/04/04/ford-escape-rated-poor-iihs-crash-tests-7-smaller-suvs/479857002/

The 2013-2016 Escapes also received a Poor Small Overlap Front: Driver-Side rating.
Starting with 2017 Escape models, Ford reinforced the structure on the driver side to improve occupant protection in a small overlap front crash, but didn't make the same change to the passenger side, researchers noted. Escape earned an acceptable rating in the driver-side small overlap front test.

The 2017 Escape did earn a 5 star NHTSA rating.
https://www.nhtsa.gov/vehicle/2017/FORD/ESCAPE/SUV/FWD
I merged your thread with this existing, recent, thread on the same topic
 

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I merged your thread with this existing, recent, thread on the same topic
Thanks, I need some stronger reading glasses. I totally missed this thread.

This might be a bit OT, but do auto insurance companies use the IIHS ratings as a factor in setting their rates?
 

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O no, it performed poorly for a test it wasn't designed for. The next generation will be proved and the net safety of the world fleet will improve. Not worth jumping ship.

Besides, 85% of the time there is no passenger.
And the odds of a life changing accident are miniscule.

Life's too short and interesting to get your proverbial panties in a knot.

So much of my life is much higher risk. Motorsports, boating, the lawnmower and chainsaw in my shed, etc
 

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Hmmm.

2018 Ford Escape
https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/cars/2018/04/04/ford-escape-rated-poor-iihs-crash-tests-7-smaller-suvs/479857002/

The 2013-2016 Escapes also received a Poor Small Overlap Front: Driver-Side rating.
Starting with 2017 Escape models, Ford reinforced the structure on the driver side to improve occupant protection in a small overlap front crash, but didn't make the same change to the passenger side, researchers noted. Escape earned an acceptable rating in the driver-side small overlap front test.

The 2017 Escape did earn a 5 star NHTSA rating.
https://www.nhtsa.gov/vehicle/2017/FORD/ESCAPE/SUV/FWD
I merged your thread with this existing, recent, thread on the same topic
It’s important to highlight that the Escape was the ONLY small CUV to fail the test...

This sucks...Ford is cutting corners! It’s exactly what they did the the F150 crew cab vs extended cab, one passed the drivers test, the other failed because they assumed IIHS was going to test only the crewcab.

Ford...where is the 2019 Escape? I’m getting close to be done with you.
 
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