2013+ Ford Escape Forum banner
1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Super Moderator
2016 Kuga Titanium 2.0l EcoBoost
Joined
·
3,910 Posts
Interesting. I don't think anyone else has discovered them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,754 Posts
These cars are around 1" lower in the front than the back so this would even it out a bit if nothing else I suppose.

I have seen threads here of people lowering the back with different springs to even it up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
H&R Raising Springs ("lift kit")

I think I am going to do it. I've got a 2017 SE 1.5L Eco i4wd. I've put BFGoodrich All Terrain on it and installed a hitch. I also pull a small tent trail.

Any opinion on if I should replace the shocks as well and if so any suggestions on what to use.

Thanks
 

Attachments

·
Super Moderator
2016 Kuga Titanium 2.0l EcoBoost
Joined
·
3,910 Posts
I don't think you'll find anything (a direct fit) for the front. The strut design changed around late 2014 with the spring bottom coil diameter changing. I don't think anyone is making struts to suit yet. If you find a listing saying something like "2013-" the listing is incorrect and they won't fit due to the change in 2014.


The good thing about H&R making lowering and raising springs is perhaps they'll influence Bilstein to produce B6 shock absorbers to match.


You can get Bilstein B6 shocks for the rear. They made them for the Euro TE Kuga (2008-2012). I bought a set and did measurements, they're exactly the same as the stock shocks. They bolt straight in no problems and do a lot better job than the factory shocks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
556 Posts
#Hoppy , please read back my notes on the lift kit page.
I posted info on my research into lift kits from Spaccer there (before I had one custom fabbed).
The lift kit they offer are front internal strut spacers like you are mentioning with these H & R Raising Springs.
Spaccer kits are basically built-to-suit for spacer sizing.
The tires you got are a nice fitment...but a strut spacer setup means ground clearance is attained at the sacrifice of strut travel...meaning you will bottom out quicker.
Since I do not have this setup, I cannot speak for issues you may or may not run into...but I can tell you that you will bottom out more on rough roads or roads with lots of Springtime frost heaves.
If these Raising Springs domn't include some sort of internal strut spacer, if the shocks aren't capable of the extra travel, I can only imagine you will have some sort of premature shock issues.

Like Murcod said, there was apparently a change in spring design from year to year inside the strut, affecting specific model year fitments.
If you went with a strut-top front spacer either custom fabbed or from Tema, there will be no issues as the strut mounts should be the same.
You can double check design schematics from 2013 and 2019 models for yourself to confirm this is the case before doing anything.
I can say Spaccer's rear lift is basically the same as Tema's or the one's I had made to fit.
The rear suspension has coil springs, so polyurethane or metal spacers do the trick.
Good luck in whatever you do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks.for.all the great info. I will definitely go back and read the thread on lifts. I'm confused though, if I can.make these springs work and hopefully with new shocks why would I have less travel. I don't see any reason for it to go down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
556 Posts
Thanks.for.all the great info. I will definitely go back and read the thread on lifts. I'm confused though, if I can.make these springs work and hopefully with new shocks why would I have less travel. I don't see any reason for it to go down.
You're welcome. The internal strut spacer (from SPACCER) results in a reduction of suspension travel. Their own website indicates that. But if you are not putting a spacer into the strut itself and are just putting in a bigger spring I truly don't know what the outcome might be. Others have chimed in on similar threads before stating there wasn't longer-reaching shocks available (at least as of last year). I thought putting in a SPACCER into the strut solves that problem...but even SPACCER doesn't sell longer shocks or springs.

I am not savvy enough with struts themselves to give you the absolute answer on this. Perhaps others can chime in here too. I can tell you what I know though. After I had the rear spring spacers put in (about 1.25" rear lift), the rear shocks had no problem fully extending/reaching/functioning after I had the rear spring spacers installed. I guess shocks have additional travel built into them. The problem is you don't know how much till you try. I thought I may have needed a rear shock-mount spacer installer but did not need to. In a strut, if the longer springs are only about 1.25" taller, maybe the stock shocks can work. Sometimes you can experiment with other shock manufacturers for a model that will work (perhaps for a different vehicle). You would have to do extensive research and development to ensure it would work and not cause functionality/reliability problems.

Having a "longer strut" from lengthened springs should be the equivalent of having a standard strut with a strut-top spacer (like mine). That being said, you will need to disassemble both the upper and lower ball joints to shoehorn in the longer strut assembly. That is one of the things to bear in mind when lifting any modern Escape. Also, if you miles are over 50,000, you probably should put in new shocks anyways and save yourself the additional labor cost in the future (as you will have everything all apart when doing this anyways).

Whether the strut-top spacer or internal strut spacer or longer springs inside the strut, the end result is slight increase in the CV joint angle. I'm not having CV problems with my 2" lift, so you probably would not if you got 2" or less out of your proposed setup. To me, a strut is a subsystem on it's own...fully contained and designed within certain specs. What I did to my Escape didn't change those specs. Like I said, it may be simple if the strut is compressed safely and you start messing around with it. but like myself, you will need to do the research and development to see how to make it work.

I with you good luck in your quest. If you do get it to work, please post info and pics on the lift kit page so others can find it in one place. If it doesn't, remember there truly are lifting options out there (Phat Matt's Custom Fab, SPACCER, Tema). Thanks.
 

·
Super Moderator
2016 Kuga Titanium 2.0l EcoBoost
Joined
·
3,910 Posts
It's only a small lift- there's no reason why the factory shocks won't cope with it. H&R are a reputable company so I'd imagine they would have done testing before marketing the raised springs.


It's not much different to using lowering springs with the factory struts. You're changing the static resting position of the strut, so you lose some compression travel with lowering or extension (or "droop") travel with raising. It's when you go too far from the factory height that you can run into problems that can affect the handling over rough terrain or damage the shock/ strut. You basically want to maintain a certain ratio of droop and compression so the shock or strut doesn't "bottom out" or "top out". Topping out is the problem you could run into with raised springs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Totally makes sense, so with these h&r raising springs the raise the back .8 inches so I have .8 less downward extension left to bottom out. Conversely I have .8 more maximum compression to top out.

Nathan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,147 Posts
with internal strut spacers, or longer springs, you lose droop travel, you are 0.8" closer to topping out. but maintain or gain compression travel.

there is a risk that you compress the spring all the way to binding before the strut bump stops, which is bad, which is why the spaccer kit had those bump stop extensions, to maintain the exact stock compression range. but i would assume the HR springs have fewer turns (more spacing), so that the bump stops will work as intented (and you can use the gain in compression travel)

I had a 1" internal strut spacer on stock springs on my Focus for a few years, i made it custom so i kept the same compression travel. I used it for rally x, i rarely noticed the loss of droop travel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
556 Posts
Totally makes sense, so with these h&r raising springs the raise the back .8 inches so I have .8 less downward extension left to bottom out. Conversely I have .8 more maximum compression to top out.
Nathan
#Thenorm has good insight into strut functionality. I was trying to figure that out myself when I was planning my lift and was perplexed! It sounds like slightly larger springs may not affect things in a major way...but there will be trial and error time needed to make sure it works for you regularly without strut or shock damage.

#Hoppy , you noted "raise the back". You mean "raise the front" instead, right? There are stand along coil sprints in the rear. Lifting the rear would increase the rear to front rake...but wouldn't need modification. The front struts have the springs built right into the strut package, so that does affect other strut performance and functionality.
 

·
Super Moderator
2016 Kuga Titanium 2.0l EcoBoost
Joined
·
3,910 Posts
Perhaps just keep this thread to the "H&R Raising Springs" - as per the title. That will prevent the confusion that has been introduced mentioning other devices/ methods for lifts (which there is already another thread on.)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Gryffindor101

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,147 Posts
I was trying to figure that out myself when I was planning my lift and was perplexed! It sounds like slightly larger springs may not affect things in a major way...but there will be trial and error time needed to make sure it works for you regularly without strut or shock damage.
well you dont really need trial and error. thats why you pay so much for HR raising springs. they do all the engineering and trial and error, and offer a working product.
 

·
Super Moderator
2016 Kuga Titanium 2.0l EcoBoost
Joined
·
3,910 Posts
Perhaps check everything is tightened properly- did you do it yourself or pay someone?
 

·
Super Moderator
2016 Kuga Titanium 2.0l EcoBoost
Joined
·
3,910 Posts
Did it myself, real familiar with suspensions. Will have to get back under it this week and tighten everything while it sits on the ground
Could the change in the swaybar angle be the problem?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
This stuff used to be a lot easier with old real trucks.
Either way, I found these on TireRack and am surprised no one here has said anything/bought them yet.

Will post link in reply, other wise they are H&R Raising Springs, i think also called "Adventure Raising Springs"

I don't know, anybody have any knowledge about something like this without actually buying them?
I wanted to put either 245/55R19 on my stock rims or downsizing my rim to a 17 and getting 245/65R17
Just made all that up though, could rub like hell.
Any info for an "old guy" would be great!
Thank you!
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Top