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I've owned a Prius since 2007...(and though it has served me very well, after purchasing the Escape, it's relegated to be used only when both my wife and I need to go somewhere at the same time..)

On the very active forum priuschat.com, there is a lot of testimony to the benefit of increasing the psi of the tires in order to improve gas mileage. Toyota's recommendation is 35/33 psi (front/rear), while on priuschat, folks have recommended going as high as 40/38, though most keep it at 38/36. This results in better mpg, as well as modestly better handling and a firmer ride.

Has anyone used this method on an Escape Hybrid yet? If so, is there a recommended boost level for the psi?
 

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I've not done it. Because I live in an area where there is snow and ice on the ground for more than half the year, I want as much tread as possible gripping the road. My dad used to over-inflate for fuel mileage. It can work for any car. The downside is your tires won't last as long. I guess the question I'd toss into the mix is: Will the measurable enhanced fuel mileage from over-inflating tires end up costing the vehicle owner more or less? On the one hand, you'll need to purchase less fuel, while on the other hand you'll need new tires sooner.
 
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My Escape has P-metric size tires. Sidewall load rating is specified @41 psi. Placard says 36 psi. Driving on a hot summer day gets me to 39-40 psi per TPMS display. I've decided not to change pressures as Ford's set point seems to span the range to Bridgestone set points.

But, for the record, I've run my tire pressures near sidewall ratings for forty years with no negative results. YMMV, but I know a bunch of folks whose mileage didn't.

Stay well,
Frank
 

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You may improve your mpg slightly by inflating the tires a few psi past the recommended pressure but of course the flip side is that the car will ride harder and the tires may wear more in the center of the tread.:(.

Up until now with previous cars I have always inflated my tires around 2 psi more than recommended as they tended to wear on the edges but I find with the Escape it is more beneficial for even wear to stick with the recommended pressure which is 33 psi in my case with the 18" rims.
 

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I've not done it. Because I live in an area where there is snow and ice on the ground for more than half the year, I want as much tread as possible gripping the road. My dad used to over-inflate for fuel mileage. It can work for any car. The downside is your tires won't last as long. I guess the question I'd toss into the mix is: Will the measurable enhanced fuel mileage from over-inflating tires end up costing the vehicle owner more or less? On the one hand, you'll need to purchase less fuel, while on the other hand you'll need new tires sooner.
From my nearly 8yrs/253k mi. experience with my CMAX Hybird I found there is alot of miss information out there concerning tire pressure. The My door sticker has 38 psi for Michelin Energy Savers A/S and they wear on the edges, but at 50 psi the tires wear evenly getting upto 92k mi. per set. Max pressure is 51 psi for Michelin's. Keep in mind that FE will always improve with tire pressure going up, about 1 mpg for me, tires lasting longer and handling better in my case. The tires last longer using the tire pressure that gets even wear which can be a range, 44 psi to 50 psi. in my case. I plan on using Max tire pressure on my FEHP when I get it to start with and monitor tire wear.

Paul
 

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The My door sticker has 38 psi for Michelin Energy Savers A/S and they wear on the edges,
Seems like the Honda folks (CMAX?) messed up with the recommended tire pressure in that case... I've not had under or over-inflation wear issues when using the Ford recommended. I have seen Ford's recommended pressure vary on some models from one year to the next... sometimes by a considerable amount.
 
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Seems like the Honda folks (CMAX?) messed up with the recommended tire pressure in that case... I've not had under or over-inflation wear issues when using the Ford recommended. I have seen Ford's recommended pressure vary on some models from one year to the next... sometimes by a considerable amount.
C-MAX is a FORD Hybrid that they discontinued in 2018 and 2020 FEH is replacing it. FORD's determining of the right tire pressure is some what complicated process. They looked at stopping, Handling and ride comfort among other things. Interesting that the FFH tire pressures were 2-3 psi lower with a car of the same weight and drive train. With my testing I found braking distance didn't change with 35-50 psi, but Handling was much better at 50 psi. 50 psi gave a little stiffer ride, but I didn't mind with the better handling and mpg's.

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C-MAX is a FORD Hybrid that they discontinued in 2018 and 2020 FEH is replacing it. FORD's determining of the right tire pressure is some what complicated process. They looked at stopping, Handling and ride comfort among other things. Interesting that the FFH tire pressures were 2-3 psi lower with a car of the same weight and drive train. With my testing I found braking distance didn't change with 35-50 psi, but Handling was much better at 50 psi. 50 psi gave a little stiffer ride, but I didn't mind with the better handling and mpg's.

Paul
Thanks, my brain couldn't place the make... for some reason it still can't... ;)
 

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Handling and ride comfort among other things. Interesting that the FFH tire pressures were 2-3 psi lower with a car of the same weight and drive train.
On our 2011 Fiesta the recommended was 32 psi. On our 2014's with the same tires, the recommended was 38 psi. I started putting 38 in the 2011 too and didn't notice any over-inflation wear in the tires after that.
 

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I've owned a Prius since 2007...(and though it has served me very well, after purchasing the Escape, it's relegated to be used only when both my wife and I need to go somewhere at the same time..)

On the very active forum priuschat.com, there is a lot of testimony to the benefit of increasing the psi of the tires in order to improve gas mileage. Toyota's recommendation is 35/33 psi (front/rear), while on priuschat, folks have recommended going as high as 40/38, though most keep it at 38/36. This results in better mpg, as well as modestly better handling and a firmer ride.

Has anyone used this method on an Escape Hybrid yet? If so, is there a recommended boost level for the psi?
I typically kept my 2006 Ford Escape Hybrid tires 5 psi above the recommendation. Did that for more than ten years. I thought it made a small difference on the interstates. No, I did not run any Control tests.

My 2020 SE Sport Hybrid is running high on the PSI because during last winter’s cold snap I added air because the tire pressure was very low.

Once the weather turned warm the PSI went up and up. I never let the air out. my mpg seems the same (very good) as before I added the air.
 

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I typically kept my 2006 Ford Escape Hybrid tires 5 psi above the recommendation. Did that for more than ten years. I thought it made a small difference on the interstates. No, I did not run any Control tests.

My 2020 SE Sport Hybrid is running high on the PSI because during last winter’s cold snap I added air because the tire pressure was very low.

Once the weather turned warm the PSI went up and up. I never let the air out. my mpg seems the same (very good) as before I added the air.
Are the tires still wearing evenly across the tread or is it too early to tell?
 

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Which is why they stopped making them . . .;)
Ford did a faceplant with C-Max.

They switched their hybrid drivetrain from an established international nameplate, to a Focus-based platform from Europe that no one in the US had seen before. They then claimed Prius-equivalent EPA mileage without checking why the numbers were too good to be true, and got hit twice with EPA ratings downgrades. Then gas prices dropped by 1/3. Then they discovered early production had a transmission problem....

Great car, though, and one of the rare cars that can show real benefits from things like grill blocks, tire pressures and ethanol-free fuel.

Stay well,
Frank
 

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Ford did a faceplant with C-Max.

They switched their hybrid drivetrain from an established international nameplate, to a Focus-based platform from Europe that no one in the US had seen before. They then claimed Prius-equivalent EPA mileage without checking why the numbers were too good to be true, and got hit twice with EPA ratings downgrades. Then gas prices dropped by 1/3. Then they discovered early production had a transmission problem....

Great car, though, and one of the rare cars that can show real benefits from things like grill blocks, tire pressures and ethanol-free fuel.

Stay well,
Frank
And Everyone I have talked to Loves the car. Amazing!😊
 

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3,000 miles only.
Way too soon to note any wearing.
Thanks...the reason I asked is that I increased my tire pressure by around 2 or 3 psi when I bought the car 18 months ago but found after around 10,000km. that they were wearing more in the centre so I put them back to the recommended pressure.

Other cars I have had in the past have behaved differently to increased tire pressures however and the tires have worn evenly.
 
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