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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have a 2015 Escape AWD Eco with about 40K miles on it. We also own a Flex Limited AWD Eco with the trailer package. This inexpensive mod I first used years ago and the same part is still available today from Mr. Gasket. On the Flex, I'd installed air bag rear spring assists for when I pull an enclosed car trailer behind it. Then, I tried installing two Mr. Gasket #1287 Coil Spring Booster rubber inserts on the front coil springs. It made quite a difference in daily driving on Turn-In, Front End Dive under Braking and generally balanced nicely with the rear air suspension when it had ~5 PSI in them.

I was recently driving the Escape and circumstances had me braking hard. The front end dropped quite a bit which reminded me of how the Flex had been. Improving the same handling features on the Escape became my goal. I bought three of the #1287 kits (one per Front spring and one, cut in half, for the two rear springs) to use. Here's what I did:

First, cut one of the Coil Spring Boosters in half with a hack saw. One is used on each side of the rear suspension. Before installing drill two 3/16" diameter holes through the center of the rubber block to be used with tie wraps to secure them. These should be drilled from the outside to the inside at around 1" from the "H" end of the rubber block. See below.

Rear suspension with 1/2 Coil Booster installed and car on the ground
74964

It was a bit difficult to push the rubber block into the spring, so use some Silicone Spray to make them slide into place easier. I found that adding 1/2 of the full ring on each side didn't raise the ride height at all, but did improve roll resistance (like a progressive spring). It also helps modestly for load carrying capacity. I jacked up the car and took off the wheel to do the back springs. They took a bit longer than the Fronts because the gap in the coils is tighter than at the front. Loosely install the tie wraps to hold the spacer in place. Once in place "screw" the insert down as far as practical on the spring. You want it to be near the lower spring mount to avoid road sound transmission to the car's body. Then tighten the tie wraps and trim off the excess with side cutters.

Next I started working on the Front springs. Here it was just a matter of raising the car and dismounting the wheel. With the front inserts, drill three 3/16" holes through the block - two at 1" in from the ends and one in the middle of the Spring Booster.

Left Front Suspension with Coil Booster installed but car still on Jack Stands
LF_Suspension.jpg


The tie wraps help to keep the inserts from moving around or even falling out. There's significantly more room between coils at the front, so installation is quick. Thread the spacer into the coil, secure with a tie wrap, but before tightening, "screw" the insert as far down as practical toward the bottom of the spring (as discussed above). Once it bottom's out, then tighten the tie wraps and cut off the excess with side cutters. I tried screwing the inserts all the way to the top of the spring and, while it works, it transmits a lot more road noise to the car body. So, remember to twist them all the way toward the bottom spring perch.

Right Front Suspension with Coil Booster installed and full weight of car back on the tire
74972


There! You're finished! I measured the top of the wheel arch to the ground at both the front and back of the car before and after installation. No measurable ride height difference was seen. (Note, you need to drive the car back and fourth at least 5 feet to relax the suspension after the car comes off the jack) This means no alignment change is necessary. As was my intent, the car now has significantly less "dive" under braking, has crisper "Turn-In" and less body roll at speed around bends in the road. Nobody's going to mistake the handling for an M3 BMW, but it's far better than when new from Ford. The Escape feels more "nimble" with this simple change. I raced sports cars for 20 years and enjoy improving ride and handling on street cars, too. This modification comes at a cost of ~$18 per #1287 kit. So that's less than $60 total for the car project with taxes. I don't think there is any suspension improvement you can do with this amount of benefit for the price.

If you tow a trailer with your Escape, you'll also notice an improvement in overall stability of the Car/Trailer combination. I would have posted this to the Towing thread if I'd known it existed, but as a newbie here I leaped before I looked.

Let me know if you try it and what you think.

Best regards,
TomV
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Here's what the Mr. Gasket part looks like before installation:
74973

The holes allow tie wraps to be used to secure the coil spring spacer to the spring.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
75007

Adding these Mr. Gasket spring spacers to the front and using one cut in half for the rear offers an inexpensive way to improve ride Escape stability for a reasonable cost. See details on the page:
"What did you do to your Ford Escape today" under the "Inexpensive Suspension Mod....." thread.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
"The Real Test"
Well, my wife's now driven the Escape with these mods for a full tank of gas and hasn't noticed any change.That's a good thing! I'd not told her what I'd done. I expected to hear some comment, but the ride change is subtle enough that she's not noticed I did the mod. I guess I'll have to encourage her to take the Freeway Ramps a bit faster so she experiences the THRILL.
:)
Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have a 2015 Escape AWD Eco with about 40K miles on it. We also own a Flex Limited AWD Eco with the trailer package. This inexpensive mod I first used years ago and the same part is still available today from Mr. Gasket. On the Flex, I'd installed air bag rear spring assists for when I pull an enclosed car trailer behind it. Then, I tried installing two Mr. Gasket #1287 Coil Spring Booster rubber inserts on the front coil springs. It made quite a difference in daily driving on Turn-In, Front End Dive under Braking and generally balanced nicely with the rear air suspension when it had ~5 PSI in them.

I was recently driving the Escape and circumstances had me braking hard. The front end dropped quite a bit which reminded me of how the Flex had been. Improving the same handling features on the Escape became my goal. I bought three of the #1287 kits (one per Front spring and one, cut in half, for the two rear springs) to use. Here's what I did:

First, cut one of the Coil Spring Boosters in half with a hack saw. One is used on each side of the rear suspension. Before installing drill two 3/16" diameter holes through the center of the rubber block to be used with tie wraps to secure them. These should be drilled from the outside to the inside at around 1" from the "H" end of the rubber block. See below.

Rear suspension with 1/2 Coil Booster installed and car on the ground
View attachment 74964
It was a bit difficult to push the rubber block into the spring, so use some Silicone Spray to make them slide into place easier. I found that adding 1/2 of the full ring on each side didn't raise the ride height at all, but did improve roll resistance (like a progressive spring). It also helps modestly for load carrying capacity. I jacked up the car and took off the wheel to do the back springs. They took a bit longer than the Fronts because the gap in the coils is tighter than at the front. Loosely install the tie wraps to hold the spacer in place. Once in place "screw" the insert down as far as practical on the spring. You want it to be near the lower spring mount to avoid road sound transmission to the car's body. Then tighten the tie wraps and trim off the excess with side cutters.

Next I started working on the Front springs. Here it was just a matter of raising the car and dismounting the wheel. With the front inserts, drill three 3/16" holes through the block - two at 1" in from the ends and one in the middle of the Spring Booster.

Left Front Suspension with Coil Booster installed but car still on Jack Stands
View attachment 74965

The tie wraps help to keep the inserts from moving around or even falling out. There's significantly more room between coils at the front, so installation is quick. Thread the spacer into the coil, secure with a tie wrap, but before tightening, "screw" the insert as far down as practical toward the bottom of the spring (as discussed above). Once it bottom's out, then tighten the tie wraps and cut off the excess with side cutters. I tried screwing the inserts all the way to the top of the spring and, while it works, it transmits a lot more road noise to the car body. So, remember to twist them all the way toward the bottom spring perch.

Right Front Suspension with Coil Booster installed and full weight of car back on the tire
View attachment 74972

There! You're finished! I measured the top of the wheel arch to the ground at both the front and back of the car before and after installation. No measurable ride height difference was seen. (Note, you need to drive the car back and fourth at least 5 feet to relax the suspension after the car comes off the jack) This means no alignment change is necessary. As was my intent, the car now has significantly less "dive" under braking, has crisper "Turn-In" and less body roll at speed around bends in the road. Nobody's going to mistake the handling for an M3 BMW, but it's far better than when new from Ford. The Escape feels more "nimble" with this simple change. I raced sports cars for 20 years and enjoy improving ride and handling on street cars, too. This modification comes at a cost of ~$18 per #1287 kit. So that's less than $60 total for the car project with taxes. I don't think there is any suspension improvement you can do with this amount of benefit for the price.

If you tow a trailer with your Escape, you'll also notice an improvement in overall stability of the Car/Trailer combination. I would have posted this to the Towing thread if I'd known it existed, but as a newbie here I leaped before I looked.

Let me know if you try it and what you think.

Best regards,
TomV
It's been more than a year since I posted about using these Mr. Gasket #1287 spring inserts on the Escape. I continue to be very pleased with the results.
Has anyone else tried this and, if so, how did your experience turn out?
Best wishes,
TomV
 
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