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Trying to find out what the numbers represent on the Power Display of our new 2020 Escape Hybrid. I am assuming that the outer ring is showing battery usage in Kw, power going out of the battery. On the inner part of the display there are a battery and engine icon. When you are using battery power the a number is displayed above the battery icon, again assuming it is Kw used. The number that is displayed over the engine icon is some representation of power from the gas engine. But what is the number measuring? It is not rpm. I have asked the dealer but they don't have a clue of what the numbers are measuring. Anyone here have an idea? The engine numbers definitely go up as more engine power is required.
 

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What does your owners manual say? My best guess is that it keeps track of power produced by both engines which appears to be measured in KW.
 

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Owner's manuel doesn't say. I can understand battery flow to the electric motors (Kw), but Kw is not a measure from a gas engine. Engine output is normally measured in rpm or horsepower, but the numbers don't line up with that.
 

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Power output in kilowatts of the two power sources. Oh, and kW is a perfectly valid expression of engine power. Not as common though.
 

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I have never hear of kilowatt being used other than a measurement of a unit of electric power.
Normally, but as @UofMEngineer said it is a unit of power. If you google, you will find conversion factors from one to another.
What you are getting is the amount of power produced by both engines in the same units so you can see how efficiently the system is doing.
 

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What does your owners manual say? My best guess is that it keeps track of power produced by both engines which appears to be measured in KW.
Is your hybrid the Titanium or SE Sport?
i bought the SE Sport. I don’t have that display, or haven’t seen it ever since buy9ng the car.
 

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You’ve got most of it right and others have filled in parts.
Summary: outer ring = total kilowatts being used (when the arc is going upwards).
Battery number = kilowatts used from the battery and sent to the wheels.
Engine number = kilowatts generated by the gasoline engine and used by the car for various needs (driving power, generating heat for the heater, etc,)

when braking, the curve arcs downward and the blue/white numbers go away, turns into one green number. That represents kilowatts recovered by the regenerative braking.

note: the colors I refer to may be a setting I did, cause both your numbers in the pic look white so I don’t recall if I changed a setting or not.
 

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Is your hybrid the Titanium or SE Sport?
i bought the SE Sport. I don’t have that display, or haven’t seen it ever since buying the car.
Its an option you have to enable in the settings in the cluster. Hit the menu button and then its something like 'show power meter'.

I've noticed max regenerative braking is 35kW where as you can put bursts of electric output up past 60kW though you rarely see it go that high. I'm impressed how much energy you can put into the battery while cold. I've hooked up the FORScan mobile app and watched SoC, battery current in/out of the battery, and a few other parameters. Even at a 15 degree fahrenheit battery, it can still put over 50A into that little sucker. Really impressive. I work with lithium batteries designed for low current, long runtime in the real world. This battery must be insanely robust to handle that type of current at such low temperatures - especially with that kind of voltage.

The one thing I with the hybrid had was a battery SoC display like the fusion/cmax do. Not that it really matters, but its nice to know when you're gettting near that 35% threshold where it likes to kick in the gas. I have fun trying to keep it in electric. Now vader don't murder me for being slightly off topic please :)
 

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Wow, this has been the most enlightening. The idea of kW (unit of electrical energy) could also be used in the expression or measurement of power that a gas engine produced. Sure enough, Google tells me that 1 mechanical horsepower is equal to 745.699872 watts.

Now my next question is I wonder how they get that measurement. In a piston aircraft, we look at RPM, manifold pressure, and fuel flow (we also monitor exhaust gas temp and cylinder temp) to determine the amount of power that is being produced. They must be doing something similar here. In our C-max, we would see RPM and kW displayed. Now in the new Escape Hybrid, we see all the power measured in kW consumed or produced to move the car down the road at a given speed.

Thanks to all who helped solve the mystery of the power display!
 

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I was using my ScanGaugeII when I test drove the two FEH's and It seemed like the Hybrid system is more aggressive than the CMAX, more power and more aggressive charging and it uses higher % of the smaller HVB.

Paul
 

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Now my next question is I wonder how they get that measurement.
Actually, it's straightforward. Ohm's Law shows the relationships, and gives useful approximations.
V=IR
and
P=IV=I^2/R
for voltage V, current I, resistance R and power P, expressed in kilowatts, kW.
Energy is the product of power x delivery time, kilowatt-hour, kWh.

For example, you have a 281.2V, 5 Ah battery in C-Max. The power rating (kW) is the product IV, or 1406W.
To get a 35kW power delivery (to or from the HVB), it's 35,000=Ix(281.2v), so I = 125.5 amps.
Given it's a 5 Ah battery, you can think of 125 amps as a 144 second charge time, so you can understand why they call it a peak power delivery. EV batteries are usually tested at a 5 amp current load (load=amp-hour rating so it's always a ~1-hour test).

Now, this gets complicated when you get much farther into the details, but these basics never change.

more power and more aggressive charging and it uses higher % of the smaller HVB
On the Escape, the most EV I can get without ICE is 20kW. I haven't had the car long enough to floor it yet, but that's consistent with C-Max providing no more than 2 bars before ICE kicked in. It takes less ICE burn to get EV to recover (faster charging) and the hill assist has yet to run out of regen capability where C-Max would be dry-spinning the ICE.

And I miss EV+!

Having fun,
Frank
 

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Its an option you have to enable in the settings in the cluster. Hit the menu button and then its something like 'show power meter'.

I've noticed max regenerative braking is 35kW where as you can put bursts of electric output up past 60kW though you rarely see it go that high. I'm impressed how much energy you can put into the battery while cold. I've hooked up the FORScan mobile app and watched SoC, battery current in/out of the battery, and a few other parameters. Even at a 15 degree fahrenheit battery, it can still put over 50A into that little sucker. Really impressive. I work with lithium batteries designed for low current, long runtime in the real world. This battery must be insanely robust to handle that type of current at such low temperatures - especially with that kind of voltage.

The one thing I with the hybrid had was a battery SoC display like the fusion/cmax do. Not that it really matters, but its nice to know when you're gettting near that 35% threshold where it likes to kick in the gas. I have fun trying to keep it in electric. Now vader don't murder me for being slightly off topic please :)
Thank you!
 
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