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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I think that this video is of interest. It explains the issues with the ecoboost engines, more precisely coolant intrusion in the head gasket.

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes, exactly what happened to mine, with only 26500km on, a 2019 2.0 AWD auto. New long block fitted under warranty by Ford, fortunately.
Seems that on the 3G there were two versions of engines: from 2013 to 2016 and from 2017 to 2019. The former engines didn’t have the issue although I read somewhere that the 1.6 ones had some issues too.

Then it seems that the issue was fixed in the 4G.
 

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Very good video with a clear explanation of the issue. I wonder whether the Valencia manufacturing plant 2L blocks were the same design from 2017 to 2019 as I have not heard of a coolant intrusion issue with them.
It only seemed to affect the blocks made at the Cleveland plant in the US and I seem to remember seeing videos regarding this but please correct me if I am wrong. ;)
I would have thought all the Ford Ecape blocks would have been the same design at that time though unless the Valencia plant did something different during assembly to counteract the issue such as sturdier cylinder head gaskets or whatever.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Very good video with a clear explanation of the issue. I wonder whether the Valencia manufacturing plant 2L blocks were the same design from 2017 to 2019 as I have not heard of a coolant intrusion issue with them.
It only seemed to affect the blocks made at the Cleveland plant in the US and I seem to remember seeing videos regarding this but please correct me if I am wrong. ;)
I would have thought all the Ford Ecape blocks would have been the same design at that time though unless the Valencia plant did something different during assembly to counteract the issue such as sturdier cylinder head gaskets or whatever.
One of the moderator on this forum in a different thread summarized these issues a while ago but it’s a needle in a hay stack trying to find what he wrote.

Maybe he will pick up this thread and share his knowledge again. I had asked him about my 2014 2.0 litres and he had listed which engines had issues since 2013.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Very good video with a clear explanation of the issue. I wonder whether the Valencia manufacturing plant 2L blocks were the same design from 2017 to 2019 as I have not heard of a coolant intrusion issue with them.
It only seemed to affect the blocks made at the Cleveland plant in the US and I seem to remember seeing videos regarding this but please correct me if I am wrong. ;)
I would have thought all the Ford Ecape blocks would have been the same design at that time though unless the Valencia plant did something different during assembly to counteract the issue such as sturdier cylinder head gaskets or whatever.
And from what I could understand, this groove/channel between the middle cylinders was directly under the gasket without any additional protection. This is asking for trouble, like a shortcut the engineers took.

Is this new little tunnel under the surface safe?
 

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I have not heard of a coolant intrusion issue with them.
There was at least one 2017-2019 2.0l EcoBoost with a rebuild/ replacement on the Australian Ford Forums. It was posted a while back.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
There was at least one 2017-2019 2.0l EcoBoost with a rebuild/ replacement on the Australian Ford Forums. It was posted a while back.
I also came across something in another discussion: Ford has removed the pink coolant and went back to the yellow one. Since I was due to service my 2014 Escape and that it was still on the pink coolant, I asked them to replace the coolant with the yellow one (my Escape is low mileage) and they confirmed that they had replaced the coolant on several versions of the Escape. The reason why they did that is unclear but I’m now running on the yellow one.
 

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I also came across something in another discussion: Ford has removed the pink coolant and went back to the yellow one. Since I was due to service my 2014 Escape and that it was still on the pink coolant, I asked them to replace the coolant with the yellow one (my Escape is low mileage) and they confirmed that they had replaced the coolant on several versions of the Escape. The reason why they did that is unclear but I’m now running on the yellow one.
They combined two different coolant specs OAT (VC3 Orange) and P-OAT (VC10 Green which was better at low temps) into a single coolant VC13 Yellow (P-OAT).
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
They combined two different coolant specs OAT (VC3 Orange) and P-OAT (VC10 Green which was better at low temps) into a single coolant VC13 Yellow (P-OAT).
Good article. Now I know why my Ford Focus 2003 (original owner) tank is stained with a different colour. It most likely had gold coolant in it originally (I checked my owner’s manual). Obviously it was replaced by a different one at some point when I brought it for servicing. Last year I had the coolant replaced again (yellow) but I fail to remember when I had it done previously over the years.

And of course, the tank in my Escape is stained pink. I had the coolant replaced by new yellow coolant two weeks ago and unless I take a sample, the tank is still pink and it is impossible to know the colour just by looking.
 

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Even more fun is that if you have the Hybrid/PHEV you have two (2) coolant tanks with the one for the battery pack on our 2020 having a green piece of tape on it and green tinted coolant even though the manual shows that the only coolant is VC13.
A friend that works at Louisville assembly told me that originally VC10 was used for the battery system to make it easier to figure out which cooling system was leaking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
So per this video, every 2.0 from 17 to 19 will fail at some time?
A friend mechanics of mine always tell me that there is the car, then there’s the driver behind the wheel.

If I had that engine, I would definitely treat it very well with plenty of oil changes. The transmission on my 2014 is supposedly fragile. I’m treating it very delicately.

Those who take great care of their engine could be more lucky (hopefully). And there’s the 1.6 engine. Not sure if it has issues too. Not everyone has the 2.0.
 

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They don't have to say that. It's a design flaw. It's not like they used cheap gaskets on some and only those engines failed. Failures have happened at various mileage.
Of course it is a design flaw and many engines regardless of car brands have various design flaws but that does not mean that every 2L Ecoboost engine from 2017 to 2019 will fail at some point, most will not.
I know this particular flaw is well documented but you only hear on forums etc. from people who have issues with various engine types. As suggested earlier you never hear from the vast majority of those who never have problems.
Also, as mentioned earlier, for some reason the vast majority of failed 2L engines have come from the Cleveland plant rather than the Valencia plant which supplied these cars to Europe and Australia etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Of course it is a design flaw and many engines regardless of car brands have various design flaws but that does not mean that every 2L Ecoboost engine from 2017 to 2019 will fail at some point, most will not.
I know this particular flaw is well documented but you only hear on forums etc. from people who have issues with various engine types. As suggested earlier you never hear from the vast majority of those who never have problems.
Also, as mentioned earlier, for some reason the vast majority of failed 2L engines have come from the Cleveland plant rather than the Valencia plant which supplied these cars to Europe and Australia etc.
Think I’m going to start a new thread on their transmissions… Could be interesting…
 

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Also, as mentioned earlier, for some reason the vast majority of failed 2L engines have come from the Cleveland plant rather than the Valencia plant which supplied these cars to Europe and Australia etc.
Reported on here? That makes sense given the extremely small number of members on here from the countries supplied by the Valencia plant. (Parts of UK/ Europe, South Africa, NZ, Australia ?) The UK and Europe also seem to favour the diesel engine options and don't even get the 2.0l EcoBoost engine. I think most do get the 1.5l EcoBoost. There are over 38k members on here with most being from North America.
 
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Reported on here? That makes sense given the extremely small number of members on here from the countries supplied by the Valencia plant. (Parts of UK/ Europe, South Africa, NZ, Australia ?) The UK and Europe also seem to favour the diesel engine options and don't even get the 2.0l EcoBoost engine. I think most do get the 1.5l EcoBoost. There are over 38k members on here with most being from North America.
No...not reported here necessarily, but shown on US and European videos and reports that were not connected with this forum but I recall that at least one video was shown here advising people (in general) to avoid the Cleveland engine if possible in favour of the Valencia built engine of that era if you are buying a used Escape and where to find the build sticker. In saying that it does not mean that every Cleveland built engine will fail as stated earlier.
I am well aware that the vast majority on this forum are from the US and would be dealing with the Cleveland built engine in the eras mentioned and therefore would have the most issues compared to other countries regardless of engine manufacture.
I am merely endeavouring to point out that regardless of views here according to reports on other sites engineers say that the Valencia plant engines of that era were more reliable as far as coolant intrusion is concerned. I have no idea why because as I said they all use the same block to my knowledge.
 
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