2013+ Ford Escape Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Was thinking of getting some black lug nuts to use with, my winter rims. I have discovered a great variety of styles, lengths, etc, and now have discovered that there is another choice - Spllne vs Hex head.
Can someone tell me the pros cons etc of the various wheel nuts out there?
Spline vs Hex
Acorn
Capped
Length
Taper
etc

TIA (and if this has been covered before, I couldn't find it)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
837 Posts
I've had splined lugs with my mag wheels before and really liked the look of them. I think the one downside of them is the fact you need a special wrench to remove them. This serves as a security measure so that is advantageous. Regular hex lugs allow you to use a standard socket for removal. I would recommend getting a solid lug vs a capped one like the factory ones. The solid lugs hold up better if you change your rims (summer vs winter) every year like I do. As far as length and taper, make sure the lug seats and tightens properly on the wheel. After installation, re-torque your lugs after 20 or 30 miles to insure they are seated properly.
 

·
Registered
2019 Honda Ridgeline RTL-E AWD
Joined
·
5,218 Posts
Personally I'd avoid "internal spline" lug nuts of this sort due to concerns about rounding/stripping of the tool or nuts with repeated torque-ing


I've not had any problems with name-brand external spline lugs


If using closed-end nuts just be sure that they are long enough to not 'bottom out' on the stud (a risk particularly if using lugs intended for thicker cast-wheels with thinner steel wheels).

The nut seat taper must match the wheel nut seat - '13+ Escape OEM ALLOY wheels (and the companion steel spare wheel) use a common 60 degree taper seat; other wheels may be different; remember to keep nuts in the car appropriate for your spare wheel if you use road wheel with different nuts !!

"Capped" nuts have a thin metal 'beauty cap' over the solid metal nut and if poor quality run the risk of the cap distorting or loosening making nut removal very difficult. That's an oft posted complaint about the Escape OEM lugs, so many suggest avoiding that type in favor of solid one-piece nuts.

Hope that helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,053 Posts
splines are usually narrower, and will fit more aftermarket wheels where there might not be enough width in the hole to fit a big socket over the hex lug.


also, since you mentioned black lugs. consider how well the paint will wear. on hex lugs. more of the surface area is a contact area. might be easier to scratch off the paint with the socket. on spline drives, there is a relatively smaller contact area with the tool, so more area will be unmarred.

PS. i ended up using the chrome plated splines because i didnt want any paint to chip off. and they were cheaper.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,875 Posts
Was thinking of getting some black lug nuts to use with, my winter rims. I have discovered a great variety of styles, lengths, etc, and now have discovered that there is another choice - Spllne vs Hex head.
Can someone tell me the pros cons etc of the various wheel nuts out there?
Spline vs Hex
Acorn
Capped
Length
Taper
etc

TIA (and if this has been covered before, I couldn't find it)
Search for spline ;)
Did mine last year, even the Ford tech liked them over the factory chrome.
http://www.fordescape.org/forum/wha...-today/58201-replaced-my-lugnuts-splines.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the replies. So far I like the idea of the splines at least for the winter wheels. They offer a modicum of theft protection and may just get the techs to manually torque the wheels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Personally I would stay far away from the chrome capped type like the OEM style. Over time the caps tend to break free of the steel lug that it is coating. You then cannot use your usual sized socket or factory lug wrench to get them off. Usually moving up a size or two will allow you to remove but still a ****. They tend to fail quicker if you are taking it to a shop that uses air tools to remove and replace them. Doing them yourself by hand and torqueing to recommended specs tends to make them last longer, but still not as long.

Now as far as which type is concerned all depends on your rim. Look at it and/or contact the manufacturer to determine what style (acorn vs bulge vs standard ect...) they require running. The lug needs to fit securely in the particular size and shape of hole manufactured in your rim. That is important.


Personally I run Gorilla lugs painted black on my vehicles. I have a Raptor that I have logged thousands of off-road miles on and never an issue with wear or paint chip on them. I have removed and replaced my lugs more often than most because of flats, standard rotations, and different tire combinations. Still have the original ones I put on about 50K miles ago and they still look brand new.




Gorilla Automotive Products
 

·
Vendor
2013 1.6L EcoBoost SE, Tuxedo Black
Joined
·
439 Posts
From an engineering perspective, the more continuous surface area/contact the wrench interface has with the lug nut, the less it will wear/strip. Period.

As far as aesthetics go, polish, plating, and anodizing/coloring will all come off over time if you ever use your wrench on them. They're very thin factory coatings that are durable to the elements, but not to a steel lug wrench. From a longevity standpoint, the manufacturer isn't concerned with making a durable product, as the cost per lug nut is minimal. The priority of the lug nut is to hold the hub threads tightly so your wheel doesn't come off. Cosmetics are lower on the totem pole.

Also, splines look great, but in my opionion you can't beat the snug fit of a hex lug nut and the peace of mind that comes when needing to horse the wrench in a quick spare tire swap on the side of the road.

$0.02.

-Rahrena
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top