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The 2020 will have an option for a 2.5L hybrid powertrain (198 HP) with a 1.1 kWh battery pack on the SE Sport and Titanium trims (hybrid is the standard powertrain on Titanium now). Additionally, there is an AWD hybrid option on the Titanium trim only, which we haven't seen on a Ford vehicle since the last generation Escape Hybrid 4WD. Wonder how popular that will be. You are allowed to tow 1500 lbs with it. There will also be a plug-in hybrid version with 209 HP, a 14.4 kWh battery pack, and 30+ mile electric only range coming in spring 2020.

The other new powertrain is the new 1.5L EcoBoost, which only has 3 cylinders and cranks out 180 HP and 177 ft-lbs. Standard on S, SE, and SEL trims, tows 2000 lbs. Even more shocking is the fact that it will have cylinder deactivation on the 3rd cylinder, which means you can be running on only two cylinders at times! Wonder if that is going to be a hated engine or not...

The 2.0L will still be available as an option on the SEL and Titanium trims and will be AWD only and include the towing package (3500 lb).

Ford is really pushing technology by including their Co-Pilot360 package standard on all models, which includes auto high-beams, BLIS, Lane-keep, pre collision alert and braking, and backup camera. Adaptive cruise will be available on SE and SEL and standard on Titanium. Adaptive cruise packages will also have the new evasive steering assist feature that will attempt to guide and limit your steering around an obstacle to prevent over-corrective steering. Really curious how the standard safety nannies will go over with the less tech-savvy customers since they don't get a choice anymore (they are present even on the base model). Especially with older folks, I can foresee some upset new buyers complaining that all these alarms keep going off while they're driving. For their sake, I hope you can permanently disable those features rather than have them reset each time the car is turned on. Hopefully Co-Pilot360 is not going to be the next MyFord Touch debacle with customers...
 

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Yea that 3 cylinder engine does sound scary ,especially when it shuts down to 2... What is the reasoning here..How many more MPG's could it get?? Can't be for longevity....
 

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Yea that 3 cylinder engine does sound scary ,especially when it shuts down to 2... What is the reasoning here..How many more MPG's could it get?? Can't be for longevity....
Confused why you would think it would be scary? These type of engines only shut down cylinders when the vehicle is driving at a steady speed. You wouldn’t need 3 cylinders to keep the speed travelling. As soon as you accelerate, the cylinder starts back up. This isn’t a new concept, been around in other vehicles for years in different engine sizes.
 

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Confused why you would think it would be scary? These type of engines only shut down cylinders when the vehicle is driving at a steady speed. You wouldn’t need 3 cylinders to keep the speed travelling. As soon as you accelerate, the cylinder starts back up. This isn’t a new concept, been around in other vehicles for years in different engine sizes.
Why? More complex electronics involved, engine internals, more to go wrong, for #1... Say you do alot of highway miles, thus the engine when reaching cruising speed it switches to 2 cylinders...Well how long do you think those 2 cylinders will last doing most the work for longevity, plus the uneven wear verses the other cylinder, for #2...Yes others have had it,, think Cadillac , with bad results...#3...Dont see the benefits other than a few extra MPG'S...
 

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IMO, your logic regarding the cylinders doesn’t make any sense. I understand that any new technology (new to Escape) scares some people. Usually they worry for nothing. Honda has had this in some models of their vehicles for years and I haven’t heard of any issues with it. I have it in my 10 year old Odyssey and there are no problems at all. The vehicle still runs like new, with over 160,000 Kim’s on it.
 

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The 2020 will have an option for a 2.5L hybrid powertrain (198 HP) with a 1.1 kWh battery pack on the SE Sport and Titanium trims (hybrid is the standard powertrain on Titanium now). Additionally, there is an AWD hybrid option on the Titanium trim only, which we haven't seen on a Ford vehicle since the last generation Escape Hybrid 4WD. Wonder how popular that will be. You are allowed to tow 1500 lbs with it. There will also be a plug-in hybrid version with 209 HP, a 14.4 kWh battery pack, and 30+ mile electric only range coming in spring 2020.

The other new powertrain is the new 1.5L EcoBoost, which only has 3 cylinders and cranks out 180 HP and 177 ft-lbs. Standard on S, SE, and SEL trims, tows 2000 lbs. Even more shocking is the fact that it will have cylinder deactivation on the 3rd cylinder, which means you can be running on only two cylinders at times! Wonder if that is going to be a hated engine or not...

The 2.0L will still be available as an option on the SEL and Titanium trims and will be AWD only and include the towing package (3500 lb).

Ford is really pushing technology by including their Co-Pilot360 package standard on all models, which includes auto high-beams, BLIS, Lane-keep, pre collision alert and braking, and backup camera. Adaptive cruise will be available on SE and SEL and standard on Titanium. Adaptive cruise packages will also have the new evasive steering assist feature that will attempt to guide and limit your steering around an obstacle to prevent over-corrective steering. Really curious how the standard safety nannies will go over with the less tech-savvy customers since they don't get a choice anymore (they are present even on the base model). Especially with older folks, I can foresee some upset new buyers complaining that all these alarms keep going off while they're driving. For their sake, I hope you can permanently disable those features rather than have them reset each time the car is turned on. Hopefully Co-Pilot360 is not going to be the next MyFord Touch debacle with customers...
Do You have any idea if the new 3 cylinder Eco has the same engine design as the old 1.6 and 1.5 blocks. Essentially freestanding cylinders as opposed the the 2.0 which has cylinder support?
 

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Regarding variable displacement engines such as the new 1.5 Escape ...

...Dont see the benefits other than a few extra MPG'S...
That's exactly the point, period.

While the 'owner' may only see the "few extra MPG's", the rest of the world sees less pollutant emissions which is meaningful when considered in the aggregate of all vehicles.

If, for whatever reason, you're 'bound' to internal combustion powered vehicles, get used to these types of systems (variable cylinder management (VCM), idle stop-start (ISS), etc, etc). The fact is that any 'traditional' IC engine that can deliver the peak demand it's designed for is terribly inefficient when not called-on to deliver that peak demand - and that's the far vast majority of it's operating life.

All of these technologies have implications on longevity, etc. But as they are advanced, designers and manufacturers are learning and getting better at ensuring those implications are addressed so they don't translate to bad consequences.

Yes, early attempts at VCM did have shortcomings - so did early versions of production fuel injection, electronic ignition, turbocharging, catalytic emission reduction, and virtually every other technology now widely accepted as not only 'normal' but beneficial.

As mentioned by @Vader101 with his decade-old Odyssey, Honda has been using VCM for many years now. Yes, Honda has refined the implementation of VCM over those years to improve it's performance, reliability, and transparency to the driver. The '19 Ridgeline I recently purchased has a much more refined VCM system than that in the old Odyssey, even though the old system has proven to be reliable.

While production VCM is not a 'new' technology (certainly much less so than production ISS), the exact implementation of the technology is where the devilish details lie …. it remains to be seen if Ford is successful with VCM in the new Escape 1.5. IMO if they fail it won't be due to the fact of the concept itself.
 

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IMO, your logic regarding the cylinders doesn’t make any sense. I understand that any new technology (new to Escape) scares some people. Usually they worry for nothing. Honda has had this in some models of their vehicles for years and I haven’t heard of any issues with it. I have it in my 10 year old Odyssey and there are no problems at all. The vehicle still runs like new, with over 160,000 Kim’s on it.
From what I heard and even from neighbors, the Odyssey has had many problems, especially the transmissions,, you have a good one..What type if gas mileage improvement if any are you getting vs. the regular engine??..
 

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Ford is really pushing technology by including their Co-Pilot360 package standard on all models, which includes auto high-beams, BLIS, Lane-keep, pre collision alert and braking, and backup camera. Adaptive cruise will be available on SE and SEL and standard on Titanium. Adaptive cruise packages will also have the new evasive steering assist feature that will attempt to guide and limit your steering around an obstacle to prevent over-corrective steering. Really curious how the standard safety nannies will go over with the less tech-savvy customers since they don't get a choice anymore (they are present even on the base model). Especially with older folks, I can foresee some upset new buyers complaining that all these alarms keep going off while they're driving. For their sake, I hope you can permanently disable those features rather than have them reset each time the car is turned on. Hopefully Co-Pilot360 is not going to be the next MyFord Touch debacle with customers...
No reason to be concerned....Toyota, Honda, other Asian car markers have made all the safety nannies standard in most of their line up way back in 2014....Ford is in fact late to the game here, this is an attempt to catch up to the competition.
 

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I don't have anything useful to contribute, but these post parts made me do a little chuckle. I don't have enough knowledge of this stuff to have an opinion really.

Confused why you would think it would be scary?
I understand that any new technology (new to Escape) scares some people.
 

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Confused why you would think it would be scary? These type of engines only shut down cylinders when the vehicle is driving at a steady speed. You wouldn’t need 3 cylinders to keep the speed travelling. As soon as you accelerate, the cylinder starts back up. This isn’t a new concept, been around in other vehicles for years in different engine sizes.
Yep GM has been using this for years now with their V8s
 

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I wonder how the engine smoothness is handled with this type of engine. More massive flywheel? Is it even a problem?
 

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Why? More complex electronics involved, engine internals, more to go wrong, for #1... Say you do alot of highway miles, thus the engine when reaching cruising speed it switches to 2 cylinders...Well how long do you think those 2 cylinders will last doing most the work for longevity, plus the uneven wear verses the other cylinder, for #2...Yes others have had it,, think Cadillac , with bad results...#3...Dont see the benefits other than a few extra MPG'S...
most of these engine technologies will rotate which cylinder is deactivated. to even out the heat distribution (cant go warping the block with one cold cylinder)
 

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most of these engine technologies will rotate which cylinder is deactivated. to even out the heat distribution (cant go warping the block with one cold cylinder)
Even if they rotate , your still putting more wear on the cylinders, than keeping 3 running...Question , when this occurs, does the engine rpms change at all to maintain road speed since they shut down a cylinder..??
 

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I’m just waiting for the first person to ask “will the 2020 grille fit on my 2018?”.

BTT
 

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Even if they rotate , your still putting more wear on the cylinders, than keeping 3 running...Question , when this occurs, does the engine rpms change at all to maintain road speed since they shut down a cylinder..??
Probably a good idea for someone to create a new thread to discuss this feature, if you want to discuss it more.
 

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Even if they rotate , your still putting more wear on the cylinders, than keeping 3 running...Question , when this occurs, does the engine rpms change at all to maintain road speed since they shut down a cylinder..??
If the engine RPMs change then so does the road speed if you stay in the same gear, so I would say they stay the same.
Each cylinder will be put under load every 3 cycles of the engine, to even out the load and wear.
 

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Using google I'm not finding any in-depth technical papers/discussion specific to the Ford 1.5 "L Dragon" engine with cylinder shut-down and it's workings (not to be confused with the non-ecoboost "Dragon" engine in other-than-US markets).

Some 'general overview' stuff but none of the more in-depth technical writing of the sort usually found when Ford releases a 'new technology' that would cover details like: Does it 'rotate' cylinders for shut-down? How is vibration addressed? Do plugs till fire, are valves still operating, how are pumping losses addressed? Etc.. etc.

Anyone running across such - please post links (or make @Vader101 happy and start a new thread specific to that engine)!
 

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My experience with 3 cylinder engines in the climate we enjoy in interior Alaska has led me to conclude that 3 cylinder engines aren't a good choice in cold climates. The odd numbered cylinders tend to run rough and when it is arctic cold the engines run very rough, and because of the severe low temps, the poor engines spend most of their run time trying to warm up, so they're running extra rough most of the time. I figure that can't be good and pray for the poor engine mounts. If I lived in a warm state that didn't have a harsh winter I'd be willing to purchase a vehicle with an odd number of cylinders in the engine, but after owning two of Ford's 1.0 cylinder engines I won't be purchasing any more odd number cylinder engines while I live this far north.
 
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