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The 2020 will have an option for a 2.5L hybrid powertrain (198 HP) with a 1.1 kWh battery pack on the SE Sport and Titanium trims (hybrid is the standard powertrain on Titanium now). Additionally, there is an AWD hybrid option on the Titanium trim only, which we haven't seen on a Ford vehicle since the last generation Escape Hybrid 4WD. Wonder how popular that will be. You are allowed to tow 1500 lbs with it. There will also be a plug-in hybrid version with 209 HP, a 14.4 kWh battery pack, and 30+ mile electric only range coming in spring 2020.

The other new powertrain is the new 1.5L EcoBoost, which only has 3 cylinders and cranks out 180 HP and 177 ft-lbs. Standard on S, SE, and SEL trims, tows 2000 lbs. Even more shocking is the fact that it will have cylinder deactivation on the 3rd cylinder, which means you can be running on only two cylinders at times! Wonder if that is going to be a hated engine or not...

The 2.0L will still be available as an option on the SEL and Titanium trims and will be AWD only and include the towing package (3500 lb).

Ford is really pushing technology by including their Co-Pilot360 package standard on all models, which includes auto high-beams, BLIS, Lane-keep, pre collision alert and braking, and backup camera. Adaptive cruise will be available on SE and SEL and standard on Titanium. Adaptive cruise packages will also have the new evasive steering assist feature that will attempt to guide and limit your steering around an obstacle to prevent over-corrective steering. Really curious how the standard safety nannies will go over with the less tech-savvy customers since they don't get a choice anymore (they are present even on the base model). Especially with older folks, I can foresee some upset new buyers complaining that all these alarms keep going off while they're driving. For their sake, I hope you can permanently disable those features rather than have them reset each time the car is turned on. Hopefully Co-Pilot360 is not going to be the next MyFord Touch debacle with customers...
Is the new 2020 2.0 engine the same block/head as the 2019 problem engines or as it been redesigned?
 

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Anyone know how the 2.5l hybrid awd copes with the rear wheels? Family member had a Toyota Highlander hybrid awd lime 10 yrs ago. When gas almost pushed $5/gal. The rear wheels had one electric motor. It would shut down ifthe wheels spun. Which of course made it nearly useless in winter. The other lesson from that hybrid was if you’re going to do 80 on the highway, it offered no benefit in gas mileage.
 

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Anyone know how the 2.5l hybrid awd copes with the rear wheels? Family member had a Toyota Highlander hybrid awd lime 10 yrs ago. When gas almost pushed $5/gal. The rear wheels had one electric motor. It would shut down ifthe wheels spun. Which of course made it nearly useless in winter. The other lesson from that hybrid was if you’re going to do 80 on the highway, it offered no benefit in gas mileage.
I’m pretty sure the technology of hybrids and AWD’s have greatly improved during the past 10 years. Along with most things.
 

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I’m pretty sure the technology of hybrids and AWD’s have greatly improved during the past 10 years. Along with most things.
You’d think. My point is really be sure you know what you’re getting and it’s limitations. Awd can mean all sorts of things.
They had no idea of the awd limitations of the Highlander Hybrid due to an electric motor only powering the rear wheels when they bought it. The dealer certainly didn’t explain the down side. The salesman probably didn’t know either.
It can take a fair amount of resesrch to find out something that becomes glaringly obvious the first time you drive it in snow.

Sounds like Ford is doing it differently. At least you’ll have the gas motor to power the rear wheels it sounds like.

“Rather than some competitors' all-wheel-drive hybrids that use a separate electric motor to power the rear wheels, the AWD Escape hybrid uses a traditional mechanical prop shaft to send power to the rear wheels.”

 

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Thinking about this in detail, and guessing, seems like a waste of time for me. Don’t get me wrong. I am interested in getting a hybrid AWD next spring. But I’ll look into it once it has been on the road for a while. And when we know how exactly the system works.
 

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I sell Fords. Trying to address some of the questions here.
1.5L I3 Ecoboost is similar to 1.0L Ecoboost. 1.5L is chain driven instead of belt, balance shaft is gear driven then attached to the oil pump. Also, only one front cylinder gets deactivated, oil pressure driven cam follower deactivates so that valves don't open and close anymore. Result is better fuel economy, driving around my usual loop which is mostly combined cycle I managed 34mpg according to the trip meter. It is still too early to tell of that's real world number. Also, when that cylinder shuts down, it has some strange vibration to it, especially when you give it a little gas. Still early to tell if this is on par with 1.5L I4 when comes to harshness.
 

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Anyone know how the 2.5l hybrid awd copes with the rear wheels? Family member had a Toyota Highlander hybrid awd lime 10 yrs ago. When gas almost pushed $5/gal. The rear wheels had one electric motor. It would shut down ifthe wheels spun. Which of course made it nearly useless in winter. The other lesson from that hybrid was if you’re going to do 80 on the highway, it offered no benefit in gas mileage.
Fords system is similar to Toyota tech, hence they share patents. Difference is that Ford can go lot faster on electric power. If I'm not mistaken up to 75mph. AWD system is more traditional, has an actual driveshaft and a differential. Not some sissy electric motor in the back.
 

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I sell Fords. Trying to address some of the questions here.
1.5L I3 Ecoboost is similar to 1.0L Ecoboost. 1.5L is chain driven instead of belt, balance shaft is gear driven then attached to the oil pump. Also, only one front cylinder gets deactivated, oil pressure driven cam follower deactivates so that valves don't open and close anymore. Result is better fuel economy, driving around my usual loop which is mostly combined cycle I managed 34mpg according to the trip meter. It is still too early to tell of that's real world number. Also, when that cylinder shuts down, it has some strange vibration to it, especially when you give it a little gas. Still early to tell if this is on par with 1.5L I4 when comes to harshness.
Is the engine block of the "open deck" or "closed deck" design?
 

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This is similar to 1.0L. Retained the open deck style block, although this time it is aluminum.
Thanks. As the former owner of a 2013 1.6 EB Escape, I am sorry to hear that. My belief is that the open deck design is what led to the problems with the 1/6 and 1.5 EB engines. Do I have hard data...NO. I would like your thoughts thoiugh.
 

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Thanks. As the former owner of a 2013 1.6 EB Escape, I am sorry to hear that. My belief is that the open deck design is what led to the problems with the 1/6 and 1.5 EB engines. Do I have hard data...NO. I would like your thoughts thoiugh.
Open deck is nothing new. It’s been around for years. It seems like the problems could be solved by machining the deck again. But that’s not done, you replace the whole block or engine. But, that supposition is based on the little info people have posted where they had actual information about the defective engine being checked . Seems to be a lot of “leaking therefore cracked” presumptions.

People like Darton Sleeves have been hollowing out Evo engines and putting in their own cylinder systens for years. Turns them into open deck essentially. Made for huge horse horsepower.

I seriously doubt with the amount of power required out of these tiny engines made to run on regular gas that you’ll ever see solid deck again. You’ve got to get tbe heat out.
 

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Thanks. As the former owner of a 2013 1.6 EB Escape, I am sorry to hear that. My belief is that the open deck design is what led to the problems with the 1/6 and 1.5 EB engines. Do I have hard data...NO. I would like your thoughts thoiugh.
I don't see an issue with open deck design. Although closed deck or semi closed seems to hold more power, there is no need for that in these applications. 2.0L is open deck, 2.3L is open deck even in the RS. I haven't seen any problems with those, except wrong head gasket recall on the RS.
Many manufacturers use open deck blocks, like BMW or Subaru. Not every single engine, of course.
1.6L had flaws, that's why it is gone now. 1.5L I4 is better, I just don't like that wet timing belt idea. This 1.5L I3 has a timing chain.
 

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I don't see an issue with open deck design. Although closed deck or semi closed seems to hold more power, there is no need for that in these applications. 2.0L is open deck, 2.3L is open deck even in the RS. I haven't seen any problems with those, except wrong head gasket recall on the RS.
Many manufacturers use open deck blocks, like BMW or Subaru. Not every single engine, of course.
1.6L had flaws, that's why it is gone now. 1.5L I4 is better, I just don't like that wet timing belt idea. This 1.5L I3 has a timing chain.
Thank you for your resopnse and insight. If I may ask, what in your opinion were the flaws in the 1.6 and 1.5? The reason I ask is that I had the 1.6 and also followed the many issues reported on this board. I am familiar with the extensive engine recall-rework on the 1.6. As a retired engineer, I have my thoughts and opinion but that all they are.
 

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Here’s some basics on the Ford ecoboost designs from the last generation. Video is from 2012 but it’s basic.
Engine details start at roughly 6 minutes.
 

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Thank you for your resopnse and insight. If I may ask, what in your opinion were the flaws in the 1.6 and 1.5? The reason I ask is that I had the 1.6 and also followed the many issues reported on this board. I am familiar with the extensive engine recall-rework on the 1.6. As a retired engineer, I have my thoughts and opinion but that all they are.
Generally speaking 1.6L is not a bad engine. 150k mile timing belt, I'm not sure about that. I think that primary reason 1.6L is not good is that of coolant loss. That's mostly related to head/block/gasket design that seems to warp or leak.
 

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Generally speaking 1.6L is not a bad engine. 150k mile timing belt, I'm not sure about that. I think that primary reason 1.6L is not good is that of coolant loss. That's mostly related to head/block/gasket design that seems to warp or leak.
You mean the "open block design" or something more specific?;)
 

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You mean the "open block design" or something more specific?;)
I don't believe that it is only because of open deck, it definitely helps with that. Engine has some design flaws, so that coolant just disappears. Kind of like those GM 2.5 or 2.4 engines that would suck and burn all the engine out of the tailpipe.
Because coolant can't just get low unless it is leaking, internal leak would be more likely.
 

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1.5L I3 Ecoboost is similar to 1.0L Ecoboost. 1.5L is chain driven instead of belt, balance shaft is gear driven then attached to the oil pump.
The 1.0 didn't have a balance shaft. They somehow offset the flywheel and front pulley vibrations so they cancel. Shaft adds weight plus takes energy to move.

Head of Ford Petrol Engines Europe:
Go to 1:15
 

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The 1.0 didn't have a balance shaft. They somehow offset the flywheel and front pulley vibrations so they cancel. Shaft adds weight plus takes energy to move.

Head of Ford Petrol Engines Europe:
Go to 1:15
Yes, you're right. I remember reading about it. I guess it shows how many of those EcoSports I sold. They are horrible.
 
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