2013+ Ford Escape Forum banner
1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Friend of mine took her 2017 Escape SE to a tire dealer and had them change the oil and filter. Vehicle had 58,000 miles on it. Mechanic at the tire dealer identified the car via the license plates rather than the vehicle ID or other significant identification on the car. Problem is my friend was using the license plates that belonged to her previous car. In our state the plates do not stay with the old car when it is replaced. State registration had not yet made the change in their records to tie her plates to her Escape. The Tire dealer ran the plates at the time of the oil change (they do state inspections so they can ID the car via the plates). The info came back as a 2007 Honda Civic (her previous car which used those plates). Who ever the person was who changed the oil filled it based on the Honda capacity spec and put on a filter spec'd for the Honda Civic.

She pays for the car and drives about a mile. No engine lights. About a mile from the Tire dealer the engine just dies and she pulls off to the shoulder. It's smoking and there are no engine lights. Right at that spot where she is on the shoulder is a Ford dealer and she goes into the dealership for help and they sent a guy out. He finds oil smoking, no oil in the engine. The service manager calls the Tire dealer and demands that they send out a tow truck since the engine has no oil.

Car is delivered back to the Tire dealer where they note that there is no oil, and where her car was parked when she drove off, was oil pooled on the parking spot. At that point they realize that they screwed up big time and put the wrong filter on. Not sure the difference on the capacity of the oil between a Honda and the Ford. At first they blamed her for the plates not being registered in the Fords name. She calls her Dad and he comes up and throws a fit at these guys. He mentioned that an attorney is going to contact the dealership. An attorney representing the dealership gets involved and the Tire Dealer admitted responsibility for the accident. At this point the car is at the Tire Dealership awaiting inspection from a claim adjustor who will report back to the insurance company. Insurance company agrees that they are liable for the damages.

The question at hand is whether the engine is toast or not. If the engine is toast, do you think it will be replaced or will they total the car? The other thing is if the engine is toast, and insurance will pay for an engine replacement, who is best qualified to replace that engine? Initial thoughts would be Ford should do the work since there will probably be a warranty on that replacement engine and all the components that will be moved onto the replacement engine. The car's owners father has a trusted mechanic who owns his own business, but I think if a problem occurs a Ford dealer would be better to have done the replacement, even if the trusted mechanic is good. The other piece is hidden damage that is found as the engine is pulled and the Ford dealership would be better positioned in getting the insurance company to fork up any extra $$ in repairs found in the repair process.

She paid $20,000 for the car in January this year and one side of me thinks that totaling it might give her more peace of mind than a replacement engine. I have no idea what the cost is for replacement of an engine.

Anyone have any thoughts about this situation or things she and her dad need to think about in handing this situation.? Her Escape prior to this situation was perfect and had a clean CarFax report when she bought it from CarMax.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,634 Posts
What a mess. :confused:. I assume you are speaking of the insurance company for the tire dealer?
If that is the case it would be up to them to decide who will repair or replace the engine I would imagine but your friend may be able to have some input and request it be done by a Ford dealer pointing out that if it is not done correctly there will be ongoing action against them or their insurance company.
This is all on the tire dealer in my view as who in their right mind would put an oil filter suited for a 2007 Honda Civic on a 2017 Ford Escape when obviously the plates were recorded on the wrong car at that time. Surely it would make sense to then check the vin. or even look up the correct part for the Escape. It's a wonder the filter even fitted. Perhaps they made it 'fit' somehow and that's why all the oil was lost.:rolleyes:
I doubt the insurance company will total the car as it would end up costing them much more even at market value.
 

·
Super Moderator
2016 Kuga Titanium 2.0l EcoBoost
Joined
·
3,835 Posts
I'd get it done (if there's an engine replacement) at the Ford dealer. Not because they'd be the best option, but by them doing it there should be some sort of warranty. Then take it straight to the trusted mechanic for a check over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yes the tire dealer's insurance company is taking the liability. They have authorized a rental car for her. Her auto insurer has already contacted the tire dealer's insurance company. I don't think however a person's insurance covers a situation like this, unless someone knows differently. She has comprehensive and collision along with liability, but I don't believe that covers this kind of situation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,634 Posts
I'd get it done (if there's an engine replacement) at the Ford dealer. Not because they'd be the best option, but by them doing it there should be some sort of warranty. Then take it straight to the trusted mechanic for a check over.
I agree but the owner may not have a say in it if the tire company's insurance company insists it be done by someone other than a Ford dealer because it is a cheaper option for them.
Hopefully common sense will prevail especially considering Ford would most likely offer some sort of warranty as you indicate. :)
 

·
Registered
2017 Escape Titanium 2.0
Joined
·
84 Posts
Yes the tire dealer's insurance company is taking the liability. They have authorized a rental car for her. Her auto insurer has already contacted the tire dealer's insurance company. I don't think however a person's insurance covers a situation like this, unless someone knows differently. She has comprehensive and collision along with liability, but I don't believe that covers this kind of situation.
If the Tire dealers insurance is taking care of the liability then case closed. They'll weigh all the options including repairs or replacement of the engine but I don't think the car will be totalled.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,634 Posts
Yes the tire dealer's insurance company is taking the liability. They have authorized a rental car for her. Her auto insurer has already contacted the tire dealer's insurance company. I don't think however a person's insurance covers a situation like this, unless someone knows differently. She has comprehensive and collision along with liability, but I don't believe that covers this kind of situation.
Yes, I would imagine her insurance company just contacted the tire company's insurance company just to confirm what is happening. They have no responsibilty in this case.
 

·
Super Moderator
2017 Escape Titanium 2.0l Ecoboost
Joined
·
1,249 Posts
I agree but the owner may not have a say in it if the tire company's insurance company insists it be done by someone other than a Ford dealer because it is a cheaper option for them.
Hopefully common sense will prevail especially considering Ford would most likely offer some sort of warranty as you indicate. :)
At least in some states the vehicle owner can decide who's going to do the work. Whenever I've had an insurance claim I've made the deicision myself as to where the vehicle is going to get worked on. When an insurance agent has provided me with a couple of options I've told them none of the above and then told them where the work is going to happen. No insurance company has ever challenged me on that.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ajef7885

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,634 Posts
At least in some states the vehicle owner can decide who's going to do the work. Whenever I've had an insurance claim I've made the deicision myself as to where the vehicle is going to get worked on. When an insurance agent has provided me with a couple of options I've told them none of the above and then told them where the work is going to happen. No insurance company has ever challenged me on that.
Yes, I understand that and the same occurs in Australia where in many cases we have the option of choosing our own repairer with an insurance claim.
The difference in this case is that it is the tire company's insurance company that is involved and the car owner will probably not have a say in who does the repair.
Perhaps the tire dealer can ask his insurance company to have Ford do the work if the terms of his insurance allow him to do that and also if he is inclined to do so. :confused:
 
  • Like
Reactions: Tall Timbers

·
Registered
Persian Green 2020 Escape Ti Hybrid
Joined
·
2,608 Posts
I can honestly say I've never heard of using the plate number instead of the VIN to pull part information.
It sounds like the tire dealer did this because they track work based off the plate instead of the VIN as the plate number is easier to write down.
Pooled oil means there's no way the guy doing the oil change started the car and checked for leaks before putting up the under shield.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I can honestly say I've never heard of using the plate number instead of the VIN to pull part information.
It sounds like the tire dealer did this because they track work based off the plate instead of the VIN as the plate number is easier to write down.
Pooled oil means there's no way the guy doing the oil change started the car and checked for leaks before putting up the under shield.
Oh yeah it was gross negligence on the part of the tire dealer. Personally in my experience I've never heard of using the plate info, but it probably saves them some time since once they access the state registration system (as I noted earlier they do state inspections so they have connectivity), their work order system probably fills in the work order rather than a worker having to copy a vehicle ID and further computer accesses to get the proper info for oil quantity and filter. Obviously the guy doing the work was a moron to not realize he was working on a Ford, not a Honda. Obviously a sign of the kind of workforce present in some businesses.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
I can honestly say I've never heard of using the plate number instead of the VIN to pull part information.
It sounds like the tire dealer did this because they track work based off the plate instead of the VIN as the plate number is easier to write down.
Pooled oil means there's no way the guy doing the oil change started the car and checked for leaks before putting up the under shield.
Both Advance auto and Autozone use this method of Veh.ID for their wholesale customers. You use their site to order your parts at a discount. frees up their counter person and usually works quite well. unfortamnatly in this case possibly an office person did the search without ever seeing the car. doesn't make it right, but possibly a legitimate excuse?????

Also the gasket may have sealed when first started and let go with constant pressure and heat. One would have to inspect the work. also could have double gasketed the filter. old o ring stuck to the filter mount???? filter must have at least screwed on and been close to fitting. Again not an excuse just possibilities. This is a good reason to take your maintenance to an actual mechanic or better yet do it yourself, not a tire shop or quick oil change place. They don't have trained tecnitions. the guy may have been a dishwasher the day before!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Both Advance auto and Autozone use this method of Veh.ID for their wholesale customers. You use their site to order your parts at a discount. frees up their counter person and usually works quite well. unfortamnatly in this case possibly an office person did the search without ever seeing the car. doesn't make it right, but possibly a legitimate excuse?????

Also the gasket may have sealed when first started and let go with constant pressure and heat. One would have to inspect the work. also could have double gasketed the filter. old o ring stuck to the filter mount???? filter must have at least screwed on and been close to fitting. Again not an excuse just possibilities. This is a good reason to take your maintenance to an actual mechanic or better yet do it yourself, not a tire shop or quick oil change place. They don't have trained tecnitions. the guy may have been a dishwasher the day before!!
I should tell you the story where I took my Honda Accord to the Honda dealer for an oil change. While the work was being done I proceeded to make a deal on a new Civic on the lot. We came to an agreement for the trade in and price. Salesman said the Sales manager would test drive my Accord after it came out of the oil change bay. The Accord was driven to a parking space and the Sales manager proceeded to hop in and drive off. About 6 minutes later the Accord comes back and is parked in a spot at the front of the dealership. I watched the Sales Manger hop out and to directly into service and come back with the Service Manager. I see them both huddling on the Accord with the hood open and shaking their heads. Ended up the guy changing the oil was changing the oil on multiple cars at the same time and neglected to put any oil in my Accord. Both he and the Sales Manager neglected to notice the Accord had no oil pressure.

At that point a number of mechanics came out and the Accord was pushed into the service area. My Salesman checked on what was going on. He comes back and said it looks like we just bought your Accord and proceeded to tell me what happened. My deal that I made was honored and I drove home with my new Civic. I asked what they would do with the Accord. He said they would wholesale it out. I always wonder what happened to the poor sole who bought the Accord down the line.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,634 Posts
That's why I no longer get my car serviced at dealerships here in Australia. Too many non carers and lazy apprentices involved with little supervision. :rolleyes:
My particular dealership was servicing around 20 to 30 vehicles of different brands daily so how they could give proper attention to each car is beyond me.
I got sick of taking it back (1 hour + round trip) due to oil overfilled, grubby seats, no map updates etc. and paying around 3 times what my current mechanic charges for the same service.
I lose a few perks from the dealership like free map updates and road assist and aftermarket warranty til 2024 but still find myself better off financially and mentally. :p
 

·
Registered
2017 FE Titanium 2.0 LOADED
Joined
·
23 Posts
Both Advance auto and Autozone use this method of Veh.ID for their wholesale customers. You use their site to order your parts at a discount. frees up their counter person and usually works quite well. unfortamnatly in this case possibly an office person did the search without ever seeing the car. doesn't make it right, but possibly a legitimate excuse?????

Also the gasket may have sealed when first started and let go with constant pressure and heat. One would have to inspect the work. also could have double gasketed the filter. old o ring stuck to the filter mount???? filter must have at least screwed on and been close to fitting. Again not an excuse just possibilities. This is a good reason to take your maintenance to an actual mechanic or better yet do it yourself, not a tire shop or quick oil change place. They don't have trained tecnitions. the guy may have been a dishwasher the day before!!
That would make him an expert on plates. Couldn't help myself.
My insurance let me choose where to go for collision repair and cut a check for the estimate. I would hope it would also apply if there was front end body and drivetrain. I only go to the same Dealership
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Oh and also, in no way would I allow that tire place to do the mechanic work of changing out the engine.
I can guarantee you that she will never use that tire dealer for anything. She's going to attempt to get a Ford dealer to do the work. I'm waiting to hear what the insurance adjuster has determined. He got done with his inspection. At this point the car is still sitting on the tire dealers parking lot.

The tire dealer's insurance arranged and paid for a rental car from Enterprise. She picked that up yesterday.
 

·
Registered
2019 Ford Escape SE with sport appearance package.
Joined
·
7 Posts
I worked at a lube shop for years and we used the license plate to keep track of the customer’s cars. I can also say that almost every single day, the shop manager would say, “Did you used to own a *?” because the customer would have their old plates transferred to their new vehicle. But the information was updated immediately and we never had anything happen like that.

L8R,
Matt
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top