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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thanks for reading my post. As stated in the title My 2016 Escape with 2.5l is flashing the dreaded Transmission Fault Service now light. Forscan tells me the code P2681, which in the 1.6/2.0l motors definitely means coolant bypass valve open. All videos and documentation here point to the 1.6/2.0l motors. When try to look up coolant bypass valve for my 2.5l it is not listed. The transmission is smooth with no symptoms of slippage or high revving. Just pass the 5 year mark by 2 months, but of course.
Has anyone had this with the 2.5l motor? Any recommendations?

thanks
Kevin
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Appreciate the answer. I saw that and after writing the post. Once I recovered from the sticker shock I decided to break out the multi meter. That valve is measuring 16 ohms which seems a little high to me. Of course I cannot find testing specs to confirm if it indeed is that valve. I wish it would have gone 0 ohms or infinity, but I am not that lucky.
Anyone know what I should be reading? It is right up front and looks easy enough to swap out but 400 bucks is nothing to snicker at.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Whats interesting is the local dealer here in San Diego wants to charge $650 for the part. And local parts stores don't carry the part for the 2.5l motor and it is different for the 1.6/2.0l motors, and a lot less $$$$
So the internet has the same OEM part in the same range jpohlman mentions above. Such ripoff for a simple 2 pin switch
 

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2017 Escape SE FWD, 1.5L
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Maybe try to go to a local scrap-yard if one is nearby?

I obviously don’t know your situation so your mileage may vary 👍
 

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Did you get this fixed? My 2016 2.5l has started giving me the Transmission Fault warning every once in a while after it warms up.

Garage says the only code is a coolant bypass valve or sensor. Probably the same problem you have. I would feel a lot better about the cost if I knew this would fix it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So I ask the group, this switch/valve, whatever we want to call it is mounted on the coolant fan shroud. The manual states drain all the fluid, evacuate the A/C system and disconnect, remove the lower radiator support, remove the shroud, unmount old and mount new with 2 ordinary screws, and then re-assemble. I ask, I beg, has anyone found an easier softer way to replace this switch in a 2.5 liter. the other motors do NOT have this switch mounted in the same area.

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So lesson learned. Although the online manual discussed in depth diagnostics for the above Transmission Fluid Cooler Coolant Control Valve, its official name, the same circuit is also responsible for the Transmission Fluid Heater Coolant Control Valve. Notice the similarity in names.
The online manual mentions both upon review, but because I was reading online it appeared like a duplicate with the subtle name difference.The culprit was the Heater one, shown in the picture below. Much easier to change than the Cooler one (no pun intended, because it wasn't cool to change out).

Speaking of which, I did change out the Cooler one, which would have entailed emptying the AC system, the coolant, the lower and upper radiator hose, the lower radiator support, and finally the radiator fan shroud. After crawling around and realizing the 2 screws which held the valve in place were attached to the plastic shroud and had no grounding responsibility, I delicately removed the valve cracking the fan shroud and replaced it that way. I am not proud of that, I like to do things non-destructively, but it is what it is. :)

Another note: I bought 2 aftermarket Cooler valves on Amazon for $55 each. I figured I would get at least one good one if I bought 2. Remember the dealer wanted $600 plus dollars as a walk in, and I could find some dealers charging as low as $425 online. Outrageous price but......


First valved leaked horribly and the second one wouldn't fire up. Ended up with the original re-installed, cracked shroud and all. I finally broke down and contacted a mechanic recommended by a friend, he asked which of the 2 did you replace? I said there is only 1, he insisted on 2. Once he pointed me in the right direction I located the Heater one mounted on the battery box (that's right, I didn't stutter). Broke open my probe and read 1.5 ohms and I knew I was on the right track. BTW - I did measure the other one before changing it out. It barely read 15 ohms, but since it was the only one at the time, I figured it was bad because it was on the low end. When will I learn.

an to the deale, $150 later and a couple of clamps off then back on y voila, no more Transmission Fault message and it drives and changes gears just fine.
One valve is responsible for cooling the transmission, the other one is for the internal heater (I believe), but because they share the same fuse (number 34 in the fuse box) and circuitry, if there is a fault there is the possibility the transmission will overheat. So to scare the bejesus out of everyone, they display "Transmision Fault, Service Immediately"

So best diagnostic to rule out which one you ask? grab your Ohm meter, disconnect the plug on the unit to be tested, turn the meter on to read in the -200 range, a good valve should read 15-25 ohms. A bad valve reads outside of this range, in my case 1.5 ohms.

Hope this helps
someone with their 2.5 l which is different than the 1.6 and 2.0 motors.

the location of the Heater one is in the picture below:

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So lesson learned. Although the online manual discussed in depth diagnostics for the above Transmission Fluid Cooler Coolant Control Valve, its official name, the same circuit is also responsible for the Transmission Fluid Heater Coolant Control Valve. Notice the similarity in names.
The online manual mentions both upon review, but because I was reading online it appeared like a duplicate with the subtle name difference.The culprit was the Heater one, shown in the picture below. Much easier to change than the Cooler one (no pun intended, because it wasn't cool to change out).

Speaking of which, I did change out the Cooler one, which would have entailed emptying the AC system, the coolant, the lower and upper radiator hose, the lower radiator support, and finally the radiator fan shroud. After crawling around and realizing the 2 screws which held the valve in place were attached to the plastic shroud and had no grounding responsibility, I delicately removed the valve cracking the fan shroud and replaced it that way. I am not proud of that, I like to do things non-destructively, but it is what it is. :)

Another note: I bought 2 aftermarket Cooler valves on Amazon for $55 each. I figured I would get at least one good one if I bought 2. Remember the dealer wanted $600 plus dollars as a walk in, and I could find some dealers charging as low as $425 online. Outrageous price but......


First valved leaked horribly and the second one wouldn't fire up. Ended up with the original re-installed, cracked shroud and all. I finally broke down and contacted a mechanic recommended by a friend, he asked which of the 2 did you replace? I said there is only 1, he insisted on 2. Once he pointed me in the right direction I located the Heater one mounted on the battery box (that's right, I didn't stutter). Broke open my probe and read 1.5 ohms and I knew I was on the right track. BTW - I did measure the other one before changing it out. It barely read 15 ohms, but since it was the only one at the time, I figured it was bad because it was on the low end. When will I learn.

an to the deale, $150 later and a couple of clamps off then back on y voila, no more Transmission Fault message and it drives and changes gears just fine.
One valve is responsible for cooling the transmission, the other one is for the internal heater (I believe), but because they share the same fuse (number 34 in the fuse box) and circuitry, if there is a fault there is the possibility the transmission will overheat. So to scare the bejesus out of everyone, they display "Transmision Fault, Service Immediately"

So best diagnostic to rule out which one you ask? grab your Ohm meter, disconnect the plug on the unit to be tested, turn the meter on to read in the -200 range, a good valve should read 15-25 ohms. A bad valve reads outside of this range, in my case 1.5 ohms.

Hope this helps
someone with their 2.5 l which is different than the 1.6 and 2.0 motors.

the location of the Heater one is in the picture below:

View attachment 81298
Hey man any part numbers? On Amazon I keep getting some other valves! Also is there a different between the cooler and heater one? I'm having the same issues! No problems but just getting the same thing "transmission fault service now"
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hey man any part numbers? On Amazon I keep getting some other valves! Also is there a different between the cooler and heater one? I'm having the same issues! No problems but just getting the same thing "transmission fault service now"
I returned the less expensive one from Amazon and bought at NAPA. Part number is NBHEHV124. Electric heater control valve
 

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So lesson learned. Although the online manual discussed in depth diagnostics for the above Transmission Fluid Cooler Coolant Control Valve, its official name, the same circuit is also responsible for the Transmission Fluid Heater Coolant Control Valve. Notice the similarity in names. The online manual mentions both upon review, but because I was reading online it appeared like a duplicate with the subtle name difference.The culprit was the Heater one, shown in the picture below. Much easier to change than the Cooler one (no pun intended, because it wasn't cool to change out). Speaking of which, I did change out the Cooler one, which would have entailed emptying the AC system, the coolant, the lower and upper radiator hose, the lower radiator support, and finally the radiator fan shroud. After crawling around and realizing the 2 screws which held the valve in place were attached to the plastic shroud and had no grounding responsibility, I delicately removed the valve cracking the fan shroud and replaced it that way. I am not proud of that, I like to do things non-destructively, but it is what it is.  Another note: I bought 2 aftermarket Cooler valves on Amazon for $55 each. I figured I would get at least one good one if I bought 2. Remember the dealer wanted $600 plus dollars as a walk in, and I could find some dealers charging as low as $425 online. Outrageous price but...... First valved leaked horribly and the second one wouldn't fire up. Ended up with the original re-installed, cracked shroud and all. I finally broke down and contacted a mechanic recommended by a friend, he asked which of the 2 did you replace? I said there is only 1, he insisted on 2. Once he pointed me in the right direction I located the Heater one mounted on the battery box (that's right, I didn't stutter). Broke open my probe and read 1.5 ohms and I knew I was on the right track. BTW - I did measure the other one before changing it out. It barely read 15 ohms, but since it was the only one at the time, I figured it was bad because it was on the low end. When will I learn. an to the deale, $150 later and a couple of clamps off then back on y voila, no more Transmission Fault message and it drives and changes gears just fine. One valve is responsible for cooling the transmission, the other one is for the internal heater (I believe), but because they share the same fuse (number 34 in the fuse box) and circuitry, if there is a fault there is the possibility the transmission will overheat. So to scare the bejesus out of everyone, they display "Transmision Fault, Service Immediately" So best diagnostic to rule out which one you ask? grab your Ohm meter, disconnect the plug on the unit to be tested, turn the meter on to read in the -200 range, a good valve should read 15-25 ohms. A bad valve reads outside of this range, in my case 1.5 ohms. Hope this helps someone with their 2.5 l which is different than the 1.6 and 2.0 motors. the location of the Heater one is in the picture below: 
I am getting a 60ohm reading for both the cooler and heater. I doubt they both could be bad. Just to make sure I'm doing it correctly I'm putting red in plug and black on ground with the meter right? Also it's 200 not 200k that you switch it to right?
 
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