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Congrats on your new vehicle. I am jealous.
I believe the vehicle onboard charger is limited to 3.3kw. So this limits the acceptance current, I'm guessing, to around 16 amp. To charge at this level only requires a 20 amp breaker, but there is no harm in using a 30. You are safer and looking ahead. There is also no harm in setting the Grizzly to 24 amp. You can probably set your Grizzly to 16 or even 29 amps and it will still charge in about 3.5 hours.
16 amp x 240 volt x 3.5 hours = 13,440 W-hr or 13.44 kW-hr. This is about what it takes to charge the 14.4 kW-hr battery (give or take a kW-hr or two, taking into account that your voltage may be above 240v, there are efficiency losses, and the fact that usable (recharge) capacity is less than the battery's stated capacity).
Thanks. That was my exact thought. The charger can be configured down to 16a, but I put it at 24. I wired the circuit with 8 awg copper, it is a short run, so it could support 50a. If needed I would only step up to a 50a breaker and 40a at the charger. We made 3 trips yesterday, 45 miles and no issues recharging between. It is a game changer for us. California gas prices are ludicrous, I am going to make every effort to avoid the pump.
 

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Thanks. That was my exact thought. The charger can be configured down to 16a, but I put it at 24. I wired the circuit with 8 awg copper, it is a short run, so it could support 50a. If needed I would only step up to a 50a breaker and 40a at the charger. We made 3 trips yesterday, 45 miles and no issues recharging between. It is a game changer for us. California gas prices are ludicrous, I am going to make every effort to avoid the pump.
Sounds like you're on top of it.
Checking status on mine now shows shipped and in transit.
FWIW, our Pacifica PHEV has refresh modes for the gas and oil aging out. So it will start up and run the ICE when it deems necessary to keep them "fresh". Engine oil can get messed up by water vapor condensation buildup in the case. This is normally not a problem for ICE only vehicles because the water vapor is boiled off whenever the engine is warmed up, which is often. But a PHEV is unique in its ability to be run for months without starting the ICE. Daily temperature changes can cause the case to "breath" in when it gets cold and condense a small amount of moisture from that air each thermal cycle. This builds up if not boiled off regularly, and can turn the oil acidic. I had a Toyota that sat in an unheated garage for several years. The oil turned so acidic that it ate the plating off the dip stick below the oil line. Supposedly gas can go stale as well so if you don't use it for long enough, the car decides you need to and runs the gas engine enough to make you put fresh in eventually. I'm guessing that the Ford also has refresh timers as well that will start and warm up the oil and gas periodically as needed. Our Pacifica PHEV gets run in hybrid mode often enough that we have never seen the refresh mode operate, but many owners that operate in the city exclusively in EV mode have. It can cause owner confusion and be mistaken for a failure of the vehicle.
 

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2022 Ford Escape Titanium PHEV
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It doesn’t matter which charger you buy, just needs to have the standard J1772. I bought a Grizzle, made in Canada. The car only accepts 16a of current, so even if you hook it up to a 50a charger, it only takes 16a.
The car should take 32 amps from your charger. You obviously need to have at least a 40amp breaker to supply the 32amps. If your grizzly is only give 16amps then you should adjust the internal dip switches to only supply 32amps. It really should auto adjust so either its not operating as it should or the feed is not adequate to supply 32amps.

Power Requirements: Requires Dedicated 240 V 50A Breaker for 40A output, Dedicated 240V 40A breaker for 32A, Dedicated 240V 30A breaker for 24A, Dedicated 20 Amp breaker for 16A output
 

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The car should take 32 amps from your charger. You obviously need to have at least a 40amp breaker to supply the 32amps. If your grizzly is only give 16amps then you should adjust the internal dip switches to only supply 32amps. It really should auto adjust so either its not operating as it should or the feed is not adequate to supply 32amps.

Power Requirements: Requires Dedicated 240 V 50A Breaker for 40A output, Dedicated 240V 40A breaker for 32A, Dedicated 240V 30A breaker for 24A, Dedicated 20 Amp breaker for 16A output
I can’t remember where I saw the 3800w acceptance rate number, but it is correct in my case. I wired the charger for 50a, but set the dip switches to 24a. I can see on my Tesla Powerwall app that the car is only accepting about 3800w.
 

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2022 Ford Escape Titanium PHEV
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I can’t remember where I saw the 3800w acceptance rate number, but it is correct in my case. I wired the charger for 50a, but set the dip switches to 24a. I can see on my Tesla Powerwall app that the car is only accepting about 3800w.
You are correct in your draw of 16amps...which basically reduces the charge time from dead battery to 3-4 hrs vs using the charger that came with the car. I believe the acceptance rate is 3300w for the Escape. The below quote is from a review of the Escape explaining its charging process - (how true it is, not sure)

We spent a week with the 2022 Ford Escape PHEV in its topmost Titanium package (priced at about US$43,000 with delivery). Using a level 2 charger capable of delivering up to 40 amps, we noted that the Escape Plug-in would charge at 32 amps (7.4 kWh) for most of its charge cycle, slowing down to about 13 amps towards the end as the battery heated and was “topped off.” Charge time from near-empty was about 4 hours in all for the 14.4-kWh lithium-ion battery. We estimate that a standard 120-volt household outlet could charge the Escape PHEV from empty to full in about 7 hours’ time.

Review: 2022 Ford Escape Plug-in Hybrid strikes a nice balance
 

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You are correct in your draw of 16amps...which basically reduces the charge time from dead battery to 3-4 hrs vs using the charger that came with the car. I believe the acceptance rate is 3300w for the Escape. The below quote is from a review of the Escape explaining its charging process - (how true it is, not sure)

We spent a week with the 2022 Ford Escape PHEV in its topmost Titanium package (priced at about US$43,000 with delivery). Using a level 2 charger capable of delivering up to 40 amps, we noted that the Escape Plug-in would charge at 32 amps (7.4 kWh) for most of its charge cycle, slowing down to about 13 amps towards the end as the battery heated and was “topped off.” Charge time from near-empty was about 4 hours in all for the 14.4-kWh lithium-ion battery. We estimate that a standard 120-volt household outlet could charge the Escape PHEV from empty to full in about 7 hours’ time.

Review: 2022 Ford Escape Plug-in Hybrid strikes a nice balance
Ours is a 2022 Titanium. The 120v charger would take about 10 hours to complete a full charge. The 240v charger takes about 3.5 hours. It does push less current in the final stage of charging. For us, the 240v charger is excellent.
 

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Hello, out of curiosity- do you have an estimate on how much $ of electricity the charging uses. I just got a regular Escape (would have gotten a hybrid had it been available in my specs).
It seems concerning to me to have to worry about finding a place to charge, the extra time required etc.
I realize next time around I would need to maybe make a change, but prefer regular or hybrid for now
I am located between Houston and Galveston and at my current cost of $0.11/kWhr, it cost me about $1.60 or less to charge our 2022 Escape PHEV from zero to 100% and I get 40 miles or more on that charge around town. L2 is definitely worth it with charge taking 3 to 4 hours from zero. I have been operating our Pacifica PHEV for more than 4 years with no noticeable degradation in range despite almost daily charging. In 2018 I modified the L1 charger that came with the Pacifica to L2 by changing the plug and adding the required 10kohm thermistor in the plug head to retain outlet thermal protection. That charge cable is current limited by design for operation on a typical 15A home supply outlet. So operating it at 240v limits its supply draw to ~3.3kw. It just so happens that this matches our newly acquired Escape PHEV's onboard charger. So it optimally charges the Escape in about 3.5 hours. I have been using the modified Pacifica charge cable to charge the Pacifica for the last 4 years from our driveway's 240v 20a circuit and now charge both cars with it. The Pacifica currently takes just over 4 hours to charge because it has a larger 16kWhr capacity. However, it has a 6.6 kw onboard charger and charges in 2.5 hours using higher capacity EVSEs. So I will be purchasing a 30a capable L2 EVSE for it. I will be looking at the suggestions here and elsewhere on the forums for choosing one and would love to hear others suggestions.
Also, the supplied Ford L1 EVSE is next to useless to me so I will probably be selling it.
 

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There is this: A comparison of electric vehicle Level 1 and Level 2 charging efficiency

Also, on my previous 2017 Prius Prime, level 1 was around 80% efficiency versus 95% for level 2.

EDIT: Oh sorry, just noticed you were talking about capacity losses from charging more slowly being better.
My experience as well. Level 2 is a lot more efficient than Level 1.
Also, consider other issues. I just got our Escape PHEV a few weeks ago so haven't deep dived into its charging system yet. But I have had our Pacifica under the microscope for 4 years. One problem that became apparent is that the 12v battery system on the Pacifica is charged whenever the vehicle is ON and whenever the HV battery is being charged. This means that if you operate your car normally and drive it a couple hours a day on average, then charge it using L1 for 12+ hours, the 12v battery is being charged for 14+ hours per day. Normally I would say this is a lot of charge time for a typical 12v lead acid battery, but not necessarily a problem in a "normal" car. However, add to this a few other conditions unique to this PHEV and you have a potential problem.
1. PHEVs do not have a starter that traditionally lets an operator know when the 12v battery is degrading.
2. The Pacifica PHEV's HV battery systems "bootstrap" off the 12v system. That is to say, unless the 12v battery holds voltage above 10v during startup loading of the HV system when you push the start button, the HV system will not start or will have problems. Typically the car just acts completely dead when this happens and will not start up. You can have an HV battery with plenty of charge left in it but no way to boot up so you are dead until you get a jump.
3. The Pacifica PHEV 12v charging system operates whenever the HV battery system is active and applies voltage of 14.1v to 14.7v to the 12v system. It typically runs around 14.5v to 14.6v even though the factory supplied battery is placarded in red print not to exceed 14.4v charge voltage! This voltage limit is typical of 12v AGM batteries used in cars.

So why do I mention this? Because it is the reason many Pacifica owners are surprised one day to find their car completely dead with no warning. As long as the 12v battery can stay above 10v during HV boot, everything appears normal. This happens because there is no monitoring system that tracks the 12v battery degradation and warns the operator to get a new one. Then one day, ''surprise!" Also, If I use the factory L1 EVSE, instead of an L2, the charge time on my Pacifica's 12v battery (being overcharged at that!) is going to be about 13 to 14 hours per day instead of 5 to 6 hours. Compare this charge time to a "normal" car that charges its 12v battery about 1 to 2 hours per day on average. BIG DIFFERENCE, especially considering it is being overvoltaged by the design of the Pacifica's 12v charging system during this time. This wouldn't normally bother me if the voltage was controlled to float level of 13.5v to 13.8v once 100% charge capacity was reached on the 12v battery, but no such regulation exists.
Because of the frequency with which dead 12v batteries were occurring when I bought my Pacifica PHEV in 2018, I equipped it with a monitoring system that I have been gathering data from for the past 4 years.
Bottom line: The Pacifica PHEV has a 12v battery charging problem where, by design, it overcharges its 12v battery (aggravated by using L1 charging) and shortens 12v battery life while not providing a warning to the operator that 12v battery EOL is near.
After a few tests on the Escape PHEV and some research, I will decide whether I will instrument it or not. (Anybody know the HV boot sequence and source in the Escape PHEV?)
BTW: IF I assume a charge efficiency of 80% and 10.5 hrs during L1 and 95% and 3.5 hrs during L2 over 100k miles of electric-only (EV) operation, my current cost of $0.11/kWhr, 14.4 kWhr/charge, and 40 miles average on a charge, THEN:
L1 charging will take about 26,250 hours and cost about $4950
L2 charging will take about 8,750 hours and cost about $4168
So I can spend $782 on an L2 charger, break even on cost, and save myself 17,500 hours of charge time.
Seems worth it.
Besides, I expect my cost of electricity to rise and that I can sell my new L1 charger, which both make an L2 charger more attractive and cost effective.
 

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Did you ever get an answer? I have the same question
The question: "How many amps will the car draw at 220? "
I don't mean to be evasive, but it depends. Also you should be near 240v.
Each leg at my breaker box is at around 123v or 124v. A measurement across them yields about 245v. At a higher voltage, charging is quicker and more efficient, and that is why I put my charge outlet at my breaker box and why my voltage is on the high side of 240. If you just assume a simple Power = Voltage x Amps (P/V=I), then the current is about 13.5a on a 3300W load at my outlet. I do not know what the exact behavior of the onboard charger is, so 3.3kW is just a "nominal" assumption. Based on my observation that charge times increase when the outlet voltage goes down, I would say 3300W is not a constant and also drops with line voltage. Your line run, wire dia, service to your breaker box, and EVSE will vary from mine.
Keep in mind that now is the time to overdesign. For example, the supplied L1 chargers that came with my Pacifica and Escape PHEVs are minimally designed with wire gages that are barely adequate. If you don't believe me, put your car on charge and then after 15 minutes or so measure or just feel the temperature of the cabling anywhere along its length. It will be quite a few degrees above ambient. This is energy $ being lost because the manufacturers are cheaping out on the copper.
I ain't no electrician, but why install a 40A breaker for LSVE2 if the car cannot draw more than 15A ?

@Matrix21 said "I ain't no electrician, but why install a 40A breaker for LSVE2 if the car cannot draw more than 15A ?

So if you plan to someday have a full EV, why not get a higher capacity EVSE now and start saving on charging costs now with lower line losses to recoup some of its extra cost. Besides buying one charger in the next 10 or 15 years is cheaper than buying two. Copper is not going to get cheaper. And BTW, I now have two PHEVs and will never buy another vehicle that doesn't plug in.
 

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does ford provide nema 14-50 adapter for 240v plug? or cable only with regular 110V plug.
Although my Pacifica PHEV EVSE can and was converted to operate at 240v, the Escape PHEV supplied EVSE cannot run at 240v. Mine passed the smoke test at 240v and is not damaged, but declares a fault condition that is not in the user manual fault guide, and will not charge.
 

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22 Escape Titanium PHEV PP+Tow
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Although my Pacifica PHEV EVSE can and was converted to operate at 240v, the Escape PHEV supplied EVSE cannot run at 240v. Mine passed the smoke test at 240v and is not damaged, but declares a fault condition that is not in the user manual fault guide, and will not charge.
Thank you for your sacrifice.
 

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2021 Titanium Hybrid
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Have a ChargePoint and it works great/ Many utility companies offer special rates for EV charging - you have to supply them with your VIN. In Northern California, you get heavily discounted rates from midnight until 4:00 PM and then high rates during the evening. If you can shift your consumption, it can save you money. The discounted rates take advantage of the high amount of solar generation we have here.

If you get an EVSE (AKA charger), you may want to up-size to at least a 40 amp unit (requires 50 amp circuit). Even though the Escape PHEV won't be able to take advantage of it, you'll almost certainly be getting another EV in the future.
 

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22 Escape Titanium PHEV PP+Tow
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Finally dug out my older ODBII Bluetooth dongle, and had a look at what it could see. Found the high voltage SoC with 0 electric range displayed as 18%. The more interesting thing was seeing how much power the HVAC system used. While charging on 120V, the HVB power was floating around -0.92KW (negative being charging). But turning on auto air at 21C, mid fan speed, the power draw would peak at 3KW. Settling down at 1.2KW once the cabin temp stabilized.

In comparison, I could barely see a difference with both heated seat and wheel on. It does explain why you need L2 to pre-warm without losing charge though.
 

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Has anyone got thoughts on installing a charger. Our local electric company has rebates on chargers but they still seem expensive. Then add the cost of a 220 line and I'm wondering if it is worth it. My PHEV charges overnight on 110 and the worst that would happen is I use a little gas for a day if it runs out of charge.

Also, has anyone got any thoughts on charging the battery repeatedly when it is +80% already charged? On mobile devices they like you to let it get much lower so the battery retains its full capacity. I find with our normal driving we get it down below 60% most days but then top it off overnight.

Thanks
 

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2022 Escape PHEV
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Has anyone got thoughts on installing a charger. Our local electric company has rebates on chargers but they still seem expensive. Then add the cost of a 220 line and I'm wondering if it is worth it. My PHEV charges overnight on 110 and the worst that would happen is I use a little gas for a day if it runs out of charge.
L2 EVSE will speed up the charging time, but if you don't need a quicker charging time, then chances are you are not going to gain much by going to L2 EVSE. It's for your convenience mostly. You don't need a fancy EVSE, any J1772 16A-rated L2 EVSE would work, as long as you have 240v receptacles with at least a 20A breaker on the circuit. There are plenty of them in the $100-$200 range.

Amazon.com : 240v 16a ev charger

But if you are installing a new L2 EVSE with a new 240v receptacle and a circuit, then future-proofing it by installing a 40A or even 50A breaker is a good move.


Also, has anyone got any thoughts on charging the battery repeatedly when it is +80% already charged? On mobile devices they like you to let it get much lower so the battery retains its full capacity. I find with our normal driving we get it down below 60% most days but then top it off overnight.
If you live in a hot climate and car get sun baked while being charged, then limiting the charge below 100% maybe a good idea. But for an overnight charging in a cooler climate, I would not worry too much about charging all the way to 100%. I have not figured out this myself, but I read in other thread someone checking with OBDII app, the actual SOC (State of Charge) of the traction battery when the dash (or App) says 100% is more like ~90% of real SOC. So about 10% of upper buffer is already built-in. PHEV 14.4 kWh battery charge buffer

This upper buffer is smaller than what I expected. My previous Toyota Prius Prime had builtin 20% buffer. But I believe that is because Toyota is much more conservative than Ford and the Prius Prime has air sourced BTM (Battery Thermal Management). I believe the Escape PHEV is equipped with a liquid BTM which is much more efficient in controlling the core temperature of the traction battery. Because of this, the Escape PHEV may not need as large of buffer as Prius Prime. In any case, there will be some battery degradation on the battery over time no matter how careful you are. I would expect annual 5% degradation would be normal. I don't expect to keep the car much longer than 3 years, so that is not going to bother me much.

All that being said, if you are regularly using only 40% of the EV range, then keeping the upper limit of charging to lower would not hurt. Just do the full charge when you anticipate longer trips.
 

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2022 Escape Titanium PHEV
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Has anyone got thoughts on installing a charger. Our local electric company has rebates on chargers but they still seem expensive. Then add the cost of a 220 line and I'm wondering if it is worth it. My PHEV charges overnight on 110 and the worst that would happen is I use a little gas for a day if it runs out of charge.
My daily driving uses up the battery.
I like the shorter charge time with a Level 2 of 3.5 hours with 240V @ 16 Amps vs. 11 hours with 120V @ 12 Amps.
And it's possible I'd buy another vehicle that needs charging.
I was able to reuse a 240V outlet in the garage, so my cost was a UL Certified L2 EVSE.
There is a 30% federal tax credit for cost of an EVSE and installation up to $1000 for residential.
Alternative Fuel Vehicle Refueling Property Credit
 
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