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And a follow-up to the above thread. They took it to the dealer. And I quote:

" They went through the diagnostic process and determined that the problem is exactly what I thought it was. The purge solenoid was stuck open. Failures of these purge solenoids apparently are a common problem ever since a redesign in 2009. This failure caused an over vacuum state in the evaporation system that sucked gasoline into the purge canister ruining it and causing the stalling problems. Also, as indicated by the service manual, because the canister is located where it is, they will have to remove the rear subframe, including suspension, driveline, brakes, etc., to replace it. All in all the price quoted to me by Bowditch is also what I suspected including the diagnostic, at approximately $700. All of this for a $26 part that commonly goes bad."

yikes!!
A "recall" by definition is for safety related faults, that could result in injury or loss of life; restraint systems, critical weld defects, fuel leaks etc. There may be a Technical Service Bulletin (TSB) or Field Service Action (FSA) that pertains to this problem. TSB's are internal updates from Ford to their franchise service departments and cover fixes to known problems that don't rise to the level of a recall. FSA's are notices sent out to vehicle owners concerning updates to vehicle hardware and/or software that can improve systems performance or prolong vehicle life, but are not considered life endangering.
I don't know...when you are trying to merge with traffic and your car just dies in the middle of 65 mph traffic with no warning, I consider that to be life-threatening. But, maybe that's just me.
 

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There may actually be a recall and you were not notified. This can happen; moreso if you are the second, third or greater owner of the car.
You may want to check with the NHTSA to see if any action has been initiated or to file a complaint.
 

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Stumbled across this thread, so I figured I'd add to it and ask for advice. I have a 2015 SE with the 2.0L Turbo engine, now around 64k miles. I've had this car since 2017 when I bought it with around 25k miles on it CPO. Till now, no significant issues. About a week ago I was driving home and the CEL came on but I didn't notice anything else. My scanner read P1450. After seeing this was an emissions system problem (most likely) I was hoping to wait till I have a little more time to do any needed repair since I am probably due for smog in about 11 months. However after filling up with gas, it was hard to start and stalled 2-3 times before I got it running. The next day I noticed a slightly rough idle when pulling into my driveway. Nothing major so I didn't think anything of it. Another day goes by and this time I hear that weird sound coming from the passenger side rear which I have read is most likely the capless fuel flap thing. BTW, that sound is an amazing feat of physics since it totally sounded like a fuel pump motor going out but as I have been reading, this is probably not the case. Anyway, I hear that sound all the way home and when I pull into my driveway, a rougher idle than the day before (but still no stall). Now (the next morning), the CEL is still on but NO symptoms whatsoever (no rough idle, no stall, no weird sound). My gas tank is about half-full at this moment.

So I think this sounds like I need to replace the octopus-like system of hoses/valves covering the engine, right? And then if that doesn't work, the purge canister in the rear of the car? I have a 2WD, not AWD so it doesn't look like a nightmare fix if it should come to that, right?

I changed the head gasket on my '93 Honda Del Sol so I have some technical experience but not a lot and I've never worked on an American car before. Where should I go for the Ford parts? And have the model numbers/part numbers changed again?
 

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Discussion Starter #124
The part # you need for the fuel vapor separator hose is CV6Z-9D289-S. This is the spider like assembly.

And you are correct in assuming you may need to change the fuel vapor canister solenoid in the rear of the vehicle.

Until you get this repaired try to keep your fuel tank at 1/2 or less. What is happening is your canister is filling up with fuel because it’s not getting purged.
 

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The part # you need for the fuel vapor separator hose is CV6Z-9D289-S. This is the spider like assembly.

And you are correct in assuming you may need to change the fuel vapor canister solenoid in the rear of the vehicle.

Until you get this repaired try to keep your fuel tank at 1/2 or less. What is happening is your canister is filling up with fuel because it’s not getting purged.
Thank you, that's what I was thinking. Do you know the part # for the canister solenoid just in case I need to buy it? Also, any suggestions for where to buy the parts from (online or in person)?
Funny how I need to keep the gas tank at a LOW level now. All the dads in the universe who told us to always keep it above half full "just in case" are doing a collective groan right about now!
 

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Online you could try Tasca Parts (a Ford dealer), or perhaps Rock Auto. On Tasca's website you can search via your vehicle year/ model and get a visual parts breakdown for the whole vehicle.
 

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Hello everyone,

If your Escape is experiencing any symptoms outside of the norm, I recommend taking it to a Ford Dealer to get diagnosed. Also, send over the mileage, and I’ll be happy to check my available resources. :)

Tricia
I have a 2015 escape it gave the code stated above, had the purge valve replaced, still hard to start but check engine light. And all this dealer talk, not everyone can afford a $1000 dollar trip to the dealership. I need a fix I can do myself.
 

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So I finally tackled this job last weekend. What a ***** those green clip locks are. I got all of them done except for ONE bastard one and it broke the fitting attached to the throttle intake. So I ended up having to take the car into the dealer. Showed them the video and pics close up of what broke - they ended up charging close to $400 to replace that part so in the end I spent almost as much as I would have had I just dropped it off at Ford and asked them to fix the problem in the first place. Why are these green clip locks still in use? My replacement uses another lock system that seems to work SO much better.

Anyway, they replaced the throttle intake and attached the last connector and like magic, done. CEL cleared and I filled up the gas tank 3x already and have had no rough idle or stalling so I hope my vapor canister is ok. One thing I don't get though is why did the CEL clear so quickly? I thought it was supposed to stay lit for a few drive cycles before it clears completely?
 

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Discussion Starter #130
One thing I don't get though is why did the CEL clear so quickly?
I think the system checks the vacuum at each drive cycle. If all is good it will clear. But you are right, other things take more cycles to clear. Glad you got it fixed. When I did mine I must of invented new cuss words.
 

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Perhaps the CEL light has gone out but it will still be logged if you check the fault codes via the OBD2 port. Some vehicles clear them from the log after X number of starts and if there's no returned fault.
 

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I just paid dealer over $900 to fix this problem. I have total care extended warranty through easy care and they said it is not covered because the system was dirty. 2017 Titanium with 52K miles.
 

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This is an amazing forum. Thanks to all contributors. I have the issue with the rough idle after fuel fill. Hasn't thrown any error code yet, but I'm trying to resolve prior to that.

I have a question about installing the new canister. Can I just cut the hoses a little before and after the canister and then install the new canister in that section using hose couplers to reconnect in-line (with some heat shrink tubing over the joints)? Basically to use something like the item below to reconnect at the cut locations and avoid the need to disconnect the giant mess of hoses.

I ordered the new assembly, but have not received it yet, so I have no idea what the inner diameter of the hoses are or if this is a bad idea for any other reasons. I would greatly appreciate any input/wisdom from anyone who is more familiar with the canister and hoses.
Freeman 1/4 in. x 1/4 in. Male to Male Barbed Coupler
 

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Discussion Starter #134
This is an amazing forum. Thanks to all contributors. I have the issue with the rough idle after fuel fill. Hasn't thrown any error code yet, but I'm trying to resolve prior to that.

I have a question about installing the new canister. Can I just cut the hoses a little before and after the canister and then install the new canister in that section using hose couplers to reconnect in-line (with some heat shrink tubing over the joints)? Basically to use something like the item below to reconnect at the cut locations and avoid the need to disconnect the giant mess of hoses.

I ordered the new assembly, but have not received it yet, so I have no idea what the inner diameter of the hoses are or if this is a bad idea for any other reasons. I would greatly appreciate any input/wisdom from anyone who is more familiar with the canister and hoses.
Freeman 1/4 in. x 1/4 in. Male to Male Barbed Coupler
Severely bad idea. And the canister isn’t the component I would replace. The purge valve assembly is what you want to replace, located under the hood. The canister is located in the rear of the vehicle, tucked up above the rear axle, just forward a little.
 

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Thanks @HayaiKuruma. I meant purge valve assembly (erroneously referred to it as a canister). I believe you when you say my idea is severely bad one, and I am 99.98% certain I will not try it and will instead battle those awful connectors all the way around the engine.

However, just so that the curiosity doesn't keep me up all night tossing and turning - why is this such a bad idea?
 

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It's been about 2 weeks and so far no recurrence of the CEL light and no rough idling or stalling. One thing I have noticed however is that when I fill up the gas tank, it consistently stops filling much earlier than before. I'm not talking about just avoiding a little top-off, I mean it's stopping the gas nozzle with like 2 or 3 GALLONS to go. Anybody else notice this? My MPG has not changed (it's always been a sucky 23-24 on average).
 

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Another thing I found myself thinking about in the shower is this: why do our cars seem to idle better and NOT stall when the gas tank is low (before we fix this problem I mean). Thinking back to high school physics, I seem to recall that vapor pressure is not dependent on VOLUME but rather surface area, so unless the gas tank is shaped like an ice cream cone, I can't imagine the surface area changes THAT dramatically at 1/4 full compared to 3/4 or 4/4 full.

These are the things that motivate me to learn more about repairing cars, it's not just saving money on DIY, it's the science behind it and learning about why things do what they do.
 

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After much delay, I put on my big boy pants and decided to tackle this project. As expected, it was pretty bad, but not as terrible as I feared. It took me a little over two hours (working at a leisurely pace) and with no major glitches. I have some modest DIY/repair skills. You don’t need to be an expert mechanic, but you should have some experience working on cars.

My advice is below for those who are looking to do this project. Most of this has already been said, but I feel worth reinforcing.
  • Disclaimer – this is my opinion based on my experience. I am not a mechanic. There may be better ways to do this. If you use any of this advice, you do so at your own risk, as I take no responsibility for anything that goes wrong with your repair.

  • For the three connectors that are hardest to reach, cut the hose a few inches from the connector. This will allow you to rotate the connector and access all sides of it which makes it MUCH easier to remove. A set of tin snips worked perfect for cutting the hoses and were fairly easy to squeeze in. You are replacing the part anyhow, so there is no need to keep it intact. Obviously, once you cut it though, you are committed to completing a replacement.

  • One of the four connectors is easy to reach, the one on the air intake tube. Disconnect this one without destroying it so you can familiarize yourself with how exactly it works. I disconnected and re-connected it a couple of times to get a good sense of how much force was required on the tabs, especially the side that is designed to be pushed in (usually white/gray, but the top one was green on my car). On the other connectors, you will have to work on them with little-to-no ability to see the connector once your hand is in there, so it helps to know how they work.

  • There are several good videos on Youtube (search for “replacing purge valve in 2013 ford escape” or “STEP BY STEP FIX!!! 2018 Ford Escape 2.0L Ecoboost - P1450 with Hesitation / Stalling Issues”). Watch the videos. Take notes. It will save you time and you can do this in a comfortable place, which is better than struggling with the engine as a way to learn.

  • A set of pick tools and a long flat head screwdriver may be helpful.

  • For removing the connectors, I found it best to first pry off the green portion of the connector with the little ears/tabs on each end. Then push the white/gray tab in while pulling on the body of the connector to get it off the tube. Sometimes its difficult to do these two things at the same time, but rotate the connector to allow best access and use a screwdriver or pick tool as needed to push in on the white/gray tab while pulling the rest of the connector away from the tube. Some people prefer to pry off both ends of the connector tabs, but I did not find this to be necessary. Personal preference I suppose.

  • You must remove part of the air intake system. I removed just about all of it, including the box that holds the air filter. I decided to err on the side of removing parts to provide more visibility/access. Thus, I also removed the cowl extension. This is easy, though tedious and a bit time consuming. If needed, you can find instructions for this by searching for how to remove the battery. May be a good time to replace the battery as well if you have an old one. If you do all of this part removal, you will have quite a few bolts of varying sizes (most are 8mm socket), but different lengths/threads, so be sure to organize these in a way so you know what bolt goes back where.
I went in order from easiest connector to hardest and this worked well for me.

  • 1st connector – the one on the air intake tube at the top of the engine. By far the easiest to disconnect. If you can’t get that one done easily, you should probably not be attempting the rest of this repair.

  • 2nd connector - the lowest one near the oil filter. I found it tremendously helpful to jack the car up and remove the front bolts of the skid plate (or whatever it’s called) that provides access to the oil filter and oil pan so that I could access this connector from below. Do a search on how to do an oil change for this model if you are not sure what part I am referring to. I used a ramp for the front passenger tire only to lift that corner and had the car up on the ramp for the whole repair. I removed the connector from the underside of the engine, but connected the new one from above. As many people have noted, it is easy to get the new connectors on as they just push/slide on, at least with the part from Dorman (I did not use a Ford OEM part for replacement).

  • 3rd connector – the one on (or near) the intake manifold, I forget the exact location. This is where cutting the tube helped a lot. I see some people have removed the intake manifold bolts and the sensor near the connector in order to wiggle the manifold out a bit. I did not find this necessary, but may be helpful if you are struggling with this one.

  • 4th connector – the rearmost one, near the firewall. This is the one designed by Satan herself. The good news is that by this point, you should have a fairly good idea of how these stupid things come off. The bad news is that even with small hands, I found it hard to reach with any sort of grip/leverage. It took me about 10 minutes wrestling with this one, and scraping/cutting my hands trying to access it from a few different angles. In hindsight, I should have worn some gloves with the fingertips cut off. Reading other people’s horror stories, I should consider myself lucky that it was only 10 minutes for me. Also, be sure to note how this hose is routed relative to the other hoses in that area, so that you can install the new one the same way.

  • Electrical connector on the valve – I don’t remember exactly how I did this, but I was afraid of breaking it so I took my time rather than forcing it. I didn’t see a typical lever arm that you squeeze/pinch to allow it to come loose, but I could be wrong. I think I pried the bottom of the locking tab away from the body while pulling up on the connector, but please be careful here.

  • Removing the valve – this is relatively easy. You DON’T need to remove the bracket that is bolted to the engine. You can instead slide the valve off the bracket, do the same for the new part to remove it from its bracket, and then slide the new part on the old bracket. This may make more sense if you start with the new part to remove the bracket. It’s a bit of pulling and wiggling (use oil if needed), but seems a lot easier than getting the bracket off or on the engine.

  • Installing the new part – I went in the reverse order of the removal. It took just a few minutes. The first one (near the firewall) was the hardest to put on, though not too bad. I had to twist the head a little bit to get the connector at the right angle/orientation to snap on the tube. It helps to work in a quiet space so can hear the click sound to know it has seated correctly.

  • You will need to put the air intake system back together and then you can make the final connection. Then you can re-install anything else you removed (cowl extension, skid plate under the engine, etc…) and you are done!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #139
Finally, a video on how to replace this part. For the 1.6 I believe. My 2.0 part looked a little different in my 2013 Escape.

 

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CEL's been on for the past month or so with the same P1450 code. Mechanic hooked it up to the machine and thought they found a tiny leak in a hose, replaced it, CEL came back. Replaced the evap purge valve (the whole spider-looking assembly), but CEL is back with the same code, both times the following days and in less than 50 miles.

I know this is a common issue and a common cause is overfilling the tank. I do not overfill my tank.

Suggestions on what to check next? If the evap purge valve replacement didn't do it, what's the second most likely cause?

One note: I have not filled the tank since the valve was replaced. It's about a 3/4 full right now. Would running it down before filling or topping it off now make any difference?

Thanks in advance!
 
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