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The link I provided about seven posts up contains links to all four of the 2013 printings.

I have one of the earlier 2013 paper versions and the fourth one, and the fourth is much thicker than the first.
Thanks. I see it lists the refrigerant in the last printing for my 2013. The 27oz is for all 2.0, so not related to tow package. But I do have the factory tow package and I went outside and looked and I do have an auxiliary air cooler. Whether this comes with all 2.0's or just the ones with tow package I cannot answer.
 

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Interesting. Can you check the date and printing of your paper manual? It should be on the back cover.

For the 2013 the digitized version of the fourth printing has been up for months but the paper manual still isn't available through the company that sells it for Ford (Helm), though I finally got one through Ford Customer Service. It's much heftier than the first edition that came with the Escape.
Sorry bjeans, I led you astray. My paper version is just like the 3rd 2014 digital version. I thought that I had read about the larger A/C capacity for the tow package in the owners manual, but I must have read it somewhere else.
Sorry my bad:redface:
Mark
 

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It's hard to get things right when there is many reprints of the manual that we are all referencing. The towing portion we also have to realize that Ford puts the differences in there probably for protection.

Since they at the factory put the hitch on they can state legally it can pull 3500#, we putting aftermarket hitch on perhaps made by the same company that Ford used, cuts down the tow weight, since if anything should happen, Ford is protected.

Same goes for the roof rack and the panorama moon roof.


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Sorry bjeans, I led you astray. My paper version is just like the 3rd 2014 digital version. I thought that I had read about the larger A/C capacity for the tow package in the owners manual, but I must have read it somewhere else.
Sorry my bad:redface:
Mark
Oh no - you mean you're ... human? ;)
 

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I have a 2013 Escape 2.0L with the class III hitch. I am interested in a 166 Retro Riverside RV camper and am concerned with the escapes towing capacity. The three Ford limits are A) 3500 lb max load, B) 350 lb tongue weight C) 30 sq ft frontal area. The camper weighs 2500 lbs, has a 260 lb tongue weight. The frontal area is 41 sq ft which exceeds the spec by 11 sq ft. No one seems to ever talk about frontal area. Does anyone have experience with frontal area exceeds the limit?
 

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@alan_mac it may be helpful to realize that frontal area relates (of course) to wind-drag and according to the laws of aerodynamics that increases exponentially with the speed of the wind acting on the trailer. So that would be a function of both towing speed plus any 'headwind' or even 'front quartering wind' you are facing when you tow.

While I don't tow with my Escape, my experience towing a variety of trailers with my F150 (and other tow vehicles) tells me that the trailer frontal area and headwind factors can be really meaningful in some situations - especially in terms of fuel mileage even when the vehicle is capable of the load (indicating the engine is working a lot harder against the wind, all other things being equal).

It's useful to realize, too, that the total 'drag' presented by an RV is much more a function of it's frontal area than 'aerodynamic details' like rounded vs square corners, 'flat' vs 'sloped' or 'pointed' fronts, etc. In other words, within the limits of 'packaging' an RV, those 'aerodynamic details' have relatively little impact - it's the gross frontal area that makes the big difference.

Once you get things 'in motion', the wind-drag on a vehicle is THE most significant force it must continuously overcome - much more than gross weight or rolling resistance.

So, though not specific to the Escape, IMHO manufacturer frontal area recommendations should not be taken lightly and in the case you describe you're talking a significant exceedance. Laws of aerodynamics tell us your engine will be working harder whenever in motion at any speed, and that will compound with higher speed and headwinds.

IMHO the manifestations (aside from abysmal mileage) would be increased engine stress, transmission stress and risk of attendant overheating with all the short and long-term consequences that go with those.

Hope that helps a bit with your considerations. Happy trailering!

(note, too, that most RV frontal-area specs don't include things like roof-mounted air conditioners or other options that may aggravate the situation even more)
 

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@alan_mac it may be helpful to realize that frontal area relates (of course) to wind-drag and according to the laws of aerodynamics that increases exponentially with the speed of the wind acting on the trailer. So that would be a function of both towing speed plus any 'headwind' or even 'front quartering wind' you are facing when you tow.

While I don't tow with my Escape, my experience towing a variety of trailers with my F150 (and other tow vehicles) tells me that the trailer frontal area and headwind factors can be really meaningful in some situations - especially in terms of fuel mileage even when the vehicle is capable of the load (indicating the engine is working a lot harder against the wind, all other things being equal).

It's useful to realize, too, that the total 'drag' presented by an RV is much more a function of it's frontal area than 'aerodynamic details' like rounded vs square corners, 'flat' vs 'sloped' or 'pointed' fronts, etc. In other words, within the limits of 'packaging' an RV, those 'aerodynamic details' have relatively little impact - it's the gross frontal area that makes the big difference.

Once you get things 'in motion', the wind-drag on a vehicle is THE most significant force it must continuously overcome - much more than gross weight or rolling resistance.

So, though not specific to the Escape, IMHO manufacturer frontal area recommendations should not be taken lightly and in the case you describe you're talking a significant exceedance. Laws of aerodynamics tell us your engine will be working harder whenever in motion at any speed, and that will compound with higher speed and headwinds.

IMHO the manifestations (aside from abysmal mileage) would be increased engine stress, transmission stress and risk of attendant overheating with all the short and long-term consequences that go with those.

Hope that helps a bit with your considerations. Happy trailering!

(note, too, that most RV frontal-area specs don't include things like roof-mounted air conditioners or other options that may aggravate the situation even more)
Thanks for the input. Well not what I wanted to hear, but I totally agree from an engineering perspective. I have an 2001 Isuzu trooper that can easily handle this trailer but it needs a transmission rebuild. Even with a trans rebuild, its a 17 yr old vehicle with 147K on the odometer. A better option is to trade my escape in for an explorer. but a substantial investment. Alan
 

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Are you towing your camper cross country? My boat is about 3,000lbs with full tank gas and I still get reasonable MPG. If your only camping locally you could be ok with the FE.


Thanks for the input. Well not what I wanted to hear, but I totally agree from an engineering perspective. I have an 2001 Isuzu trooper that can easily handle this trailer but it needs a transmission rebuild. Even with a trans rebuild, its a 17 yr old vehicle with 147K on the odometer. A better option is to trade my escape in for an explorer. but a substantial investment. Alan
 

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Are you towing your camper cross country? My boat is about 3,000lbs with full tank gas and I still get reasonable MPG. If your only camping locally you could be ok with the FE.

I doubt I would go cross country. But I would take it all over the Pacific North West, possibly down in CA and NV. I am not worried about the max weight limit since its 3500 lbs and the trailer is 2500 lbs. I think the max frontal area limit of 30 sq ft when the trailer is 41 sq-ft will be a problem with wind and mountains. We have some very windy places like the Columbia Gorge, Pacific Ocean and many mountain ranges. Alan
 
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I doubt I would go cross country. But I would take it all over the Pacific North West, possibly down in CA and NV. I am not worried about the max weight limit since its 3500 lbs and the trailer is 2500 lbs. I think the max frontal area limit of 30 sq ft when the trailer is 41 sq-ft will be a problem with wind and mountains. We have some very windy places like the Columbia Gorge, Pacific Ocean and many mountain ranges. Alan
The drag could be bad with that wide footprint, but no mountains, hills, or even oceans here in Chicago. Maybe a speed bump and a red light camera or 2 :)
 

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.... Well not what I wanted to hear, but I totally agree from an engineering perspective. ....
That darned "engineering perspective", lol.

Happy trailering!

Alan (also!) ;)
 

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While the tow rating for the 2001 Isuzu Trooper is higher, it is important to understand that it was rated under a different test system. Back then, mfgrs just rated car's tow ratings to be competitive in the marketplace. It is only within the last few years that cars are (the Escape) rated by industry standard test regimes. Tow ratings based on different test conditions are not comparable. I'm not saying that the Isuzu is worse or better than the Escape at towing your intended trailer. I'm just saying they are rated under different conditions, probably you will never know how the Isuzu was rated.

For example my old GMC Jimmy was rated well over 5000 lbs (with the right tow hitch) with a vehicle weight of about the same as the Escape and the escape has a higher HO and Torque rating than the Jimmy did. Not that these are the only things to consider for tow ratings.
 

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While the tow rating for the 2001 Isuzu Trooper is higher, it is important to understand that it was rated under a different test system. Back then, mfgrs just rated car's tow ratings to be competitive in the marketplace. It is only within the last few years that cars are (the Escape) rated by industry standard test regimes. Tow ratings based on different test conditions are not comparable. I'm not saying that the Isuzu is worse or better than the Escape at towing your intended trailer. I'm just saying they are rated under different conditions, probably you will never know how the Isuzu was rated.

For example my old GMC Jimmy was rated well over 5000 lbs (with the right tow hitch) with a vehicle weight of about the same as the Escape and the escape has a higher HO and Torque rating than the Jimmy did. Not that these are the only things to consider for tow ratings.
Good to know, thank you. The trooper has a 3.5L V6, true 4x4 and has a body on frame design. Its doesn't have sway control but I think could handle this trailer. For 147K miles its in very good shape except the transmission and for ~ $3K I could get it fixed by a reputable shop. Something to consider. As an example... If I traded in my Escape for a low mileage 2017 Explorer, I would need to pony up ~ $15 to 16K. Alan
 

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The Ford limit is 30 sq ft intended at maximum posted speed limit. What is that 80mph In some states?
Someone probably mentioned that aero drag is based on the square of velocity.
IMO, if you kept it to a reasonable 60mph, there would be no extra load on the escape.

Your mileage will vary
 

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I would like to know what size of camper can my 2014 Escape tow. I am looking to rent or purchase a camper and would like to know how big I can get?
 

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I would like to know what size of camper can my 2014 Escape tow. I am looking to rent or purchase a camper and would like to know how big I can get?
If you have a factory tow package you are looking at something in the 15-17' range that has a GVWR under 3500. If you don't have factory tow package then you are looking at a smallish pop-up or a small tear-drop as you wont find any regular travel trailers under 2000 GVWR. You can't increase tow capacity by adding anything, its rated for what it was rated for from the factory.
 

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Does anyone have any experience towing (preferably with a camper) with a 2014 Ford Escape Titanium with the 2.0L engine? Supposedly it can tow up to 3500 LBS. I’m not looking to tow anything massive..just a popup camper probably in the 2000-3000 lbs range.
  1. Is it safe to tow up to the 3500 LBS limit or is this like a “technically it can tow this much, but you really shouldn’t” type of weight?
  2. I don’t currently have a hitch installed. Am I good with just getting a class II hitch installed from any reputable dealer/installer?
  3. Any other gotchas or experience anyone can share about towing?
thanks in advance for any tips/advice/help.
 

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Does anyone have any experience towing (preferably with a camper) with a 2014 Ford Escape Titanium with the 2.0L engine? Supposedly it can tow up to 3500 LBS. I’m not looking to tow anything massive..just a popup camper probably in the 2000-3000 lbs range.
  1. Is it safe to tow up to the 3500 LBS limit or is this like a “technically it can tow this much, but you really shouldn’t” type of weight?
  2. I don’t currently have a hitch installed. Am I good with just getting a class II hitch installed from any reputable dealer/installer?
  3. Any other gotchas or experience anyone can share about towing?
thanks in advance for any tips/advice/help.
I merged your thread with this existing thread that will answer your questions. On post #2, it mentions that the 3500lb tow rating is only for factory installed hitches. Aftermarket hitches only give you 2000lbs. There are other tow threads that may also help you with your questions.
 

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probably in the 2000-3000 lbs range.
That’s your first problem. When folks start throwing around words like “maybe”, “probably”, ”sort of”, etc. that’s when things go south.

Find out exactly the weight your towing.

Second major problem is the 3500lb. rating is for vehicles with the factory tow package. It has sway control. You don’t have that. So now the 3500 is reduced to less. Read the manual.

The only other advise I can give is about the towing capacity. Yes, it’s 3500 lbs. if you have a 2.0 with AWD. BUT remember, that’s on a brand new vehicle that Ford tested. So ask yourself how many miles are on your current vehicle. How’s the tires? How’s the brakes? Are all the fluids nice and fresh or are they 100,000 miles broken in. The list goes on.

Just want you to keep things in realistic perspective.
 

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That’s your first problem. When folks start throwing around words like “maybe”, “probably”, ”sort of”, etc. that’s when things go south.

Find out exactly the weight your towing.

Second major problem is the 3500lb. rating is for vehicles with the factory tow package. It has sway control. You don’t have that. So now the 3500 is reduced to less. Read the manual.

The only other advise I can give is about the towing capacity. Yes, it’s 3500 lbs. if you have a 2.0 with AWD. BUT remember, that’s on a brand new vehicle that Ford tested. So ask yourself how many miles are on your current vehicle. How’s the tires? How’s the brakes? Are all the fluids nice and fresh or are they 100,000 miles broken in. The list goes on.

Just want you to keep things in realistic perspective.
Thanks...this is the kind of information I was looking for. I didn't know exactly what I was going to be towing due to not knowing the weight limit. I had a list of about 5 campers in the 1500-3000 range. So this info narrows down that list significantly.

Just got new tires and brakes over the last year. Car has about 70k miles on it. I think the transmission fluid is probably the next one I need done.

Yeah, realistic perspective is what I'm going for. Thanks again!
 
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