2013+ Ford Escape Forum banner

121 - 128 of 128 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
You bring up a good point. You are under a warranty from a third party. Taking it upon yourself to fix it may not be the best idea because you may void any remaining warranty on the transmission if you have new problems or the problem still exists since you are not an authorized tech. it's not like you're changing the spark plugs and the transmission fails. You are going to be working directly on the transmission and internal components.

This is how I would proceed. This is just my opinion, you can do whatever you want. I understand the hesitation of going to a dealer, they are hit-or-miss sometimes. Two in my area I flat out refuse to go to, the third one, even though they are great, I sometimes still have to make certain things are done the way I want them done or that they deliver as they say on their work.

Contact the warranty company and have them review the issue with you. Few reasons:
1) Since there is a perceived problem, they may not cover it anyway because it is not a diagnosed problem. Meaning, it ain't broke so they won't allow it to be fixed. Unless the dealer diagnoes it as a problem. In that case, you are free and clear and should just have it done at the dealer.

2) If it's not a diagnosed problem, By making the warranty company aware of a perceived issue, if it fails later while just outside of their warranty, you may have some leverage to get it fixed. They were made aware of a pending issue but chose to ignore it. It was documented so they rolled the dice and could potentially pay for that. That is not legal advice but just from experience. it really depends on the warranty company and the laws in your state.

3) Do you have rental coverage from your warranty company?

Back on topic, the orientation is pretty straight forward. The trans pan is facing the radiator on the drivers side. What you won't be able to see with just a picture is what all is in front of it, unless they are some really detailed pics and/or you have a service manual that gives you really good diagrams etc. Even then, you can't really know until you get your own eyeballs and hands on it.
The warranty company will not approve something that isn't broken but, at the same time, I don't want to wait until it breaks, thus I'd rather do it myself. I wish the solenoids were accessible from the bottom.I honestly don't want to risk taking anything off on the front just to get to the pan. I'm going to flush the tranny one more time. It's interesting when I accelerate hard from a traffic light, from second to third shifts smoothly. It only shifts hard when I accelerate slowly. For example, if i slowly leave a traffic light, from first to second is smooth, then from second to third the RPMs go all the way up to 3500-4000 RPMs and then jerks into third.
Anyone know how much the dealership will charge to do a PCM flash? If it's under 100 dollars, I will bring it to the dealer and have them flash it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
502 Posts
The warranty company will not approve something that isn't broken but, at the same time, I don't want to wait until it breaks, thus I'd rather do it myself. I wish the solenoids were accessible from the bottom.I honestly don't want to risk taking anything off on the front just to get to the pan. I'm going to flush the tranny one more time. It's interesting when I accelerate hard from a traffic light, from second to third shifts smoothly. It only shifts hard when I accelerate slowly. For example, if i slowly leave a traffic light, from first to second is smooth, then from second to third the RPMs go all the way up to 3500-4000 RPMs and then jerks into third.
Anyone know how much the dealership will charge to do a PCM flash? If it's under 100 dollars, I will bring it to the dealer and have them flash it.
Well, you're in a catch 22. I feel what you're saying about, to get in there and work on it yourself vs waiting for it to break. You have to work out the pros and cons as they work out for you to decide.

At wider open throttle, the transmission most likely reduces the shift time (to reduce slip) by increasing the fluid pressure. At higher pressures, whatever is sticking doesn't have a chance to stick or, if solenoid has a dead spot in it's signal to response curve, the gap in the signal just gets skipped over .

The solenoids are PWM (Pulse width modulated) It's a pretty standard way of obtaining electro-mechanical movement (analog) through digital means while allowing the circuit to maintain a stable and low voltage. Over time the signal or the receiving part (typically) can degrade so the electro-mechanical response is not linear. There are essentially gaps in the signal vs expected movement and those gaps can translate into sluggish or harsh shifting patterns.

At lower throttle inputs the signal is more incremental or not ramping up as fast so things work more gradually/slowly. That's one reason why it can be very hard to duplicate transmission problems at any RPM. The conditions have to be nearly identical to get a gremlin to pop up consistently (throttle, fluid temp, ambient conditions sometimes, etc).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Well, you're in a catch 22. I feel what you're saying about, to get in there and work on it yourself vs waiting for it to break. You have to work out the pros and cons as they work out for you to decide.

At wider open throttle, the transmission most likely reduces the shift time (to reduce slip) by increasing the fluid pressure. At higher pressures, whatever is sticking doesn't have a chance to stick or, if solenoid has a dead spot in it's signal to response curve, the gap in the signal just gets skipped over .

The solenoids are PWM (Pulse width modulated) It's a pretty standard way of obtaining electro-mechanical movement (analog) through digital means while allowing the circuit to maintain a stable and low voltage. Over time the signal or the receiving part (typically) can degrade so the electro-mechanical response is not linear. There are essentially gaps in the signal vs expected movement and those gaps can translate into sluggish or harsh shifting patterns.

At lower throttle inputs the signal is more incremental or not ramping up as fast so things work more gradually/slowly. That's one reason why it can be very hard to duplicate transmission problems at any RPM. The conditions have to be nearly identical to get a gremlin to pop up consistently (throttle, fluid temp, ambient conditions sometimes, etc).
Thanks for the insight. Should I not worry and go on with my day to day routines, or should I attempt to get the PCM reset? Should I invest in flushing the fluid one more time? Am I too paranoid?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
502 Posts
That sounds like a tele-novela finale, Dun dun DUUUUUUUUNN! :D

I can't say what is the best choice for you. A PCM reset you can do yourself to get rid of any recently learned behaviors. It would not hurt to flush one-more time and possibly see if the dealer has a more current firmware for the transmission. Beyond that, I don't know how severe or how severe you perceive the problem to be to help you decide what is best for you. It does sound a little like what my daughers car acts like. Her and I are both pretty assertive/aggressive drivers.

I don't think this was discussed before but, have you tried sport mode? It winds out the RPM's higher before it goes into the next gear. This essentially changes the shift patterns at all speeds. If the issues are the same or worse then you know it's mechanical. If they go away, it may just be your driving style or the firmware.

I know I can get into most automatic vehicles and have the transmission do weird things because they are tuned for economy, not performance. If they are newer and have a sport mode, I will enable it and many cases, the weird responses mostly go away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
397 Posts
I can feel the jerk when it shifts into third gear. When it shifts from first to second, it shifts at around 2,000 RPM. When it shifts from second to third, the acceleration goes up to around 3,000RPMs, sits there for about a second, then shifts into third. I can feel the shift, unlike the other gears. Sometimes I can feel the downshifts but, they aren't as apparent as the shift from second to third. The downshifts are very light just like the upshifts. If I drive hard, if shifts nicely in all gears. My concern is, at some point the car won't shift into third.
My 2015 1.6L with 115K Miles is doing same thing. Long shift times to 3rd. It is now starting to shift strange 1st to 2nd and 2nd to 1st. Like it's ever so slightly slipping. Does leaving the battery unplugged for a while reset the TCM?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
813 Posts
You are due for a remanufactured transmission
I have ongoing problems with mine since the torque converter was replaced at 90,000 miles. I also had them put in a new valve body. When car is cold hard shift between 2nd and 3rd
My problem is overheating and cooking the LV Mercon, I also know that there is metal in the fluid
I am going to request a Ford Remanufactured Transmission. The job wasn't done right the 1st time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
397 Posts
Anyone else ever get a delayed shift from 2-3? Sometimes last 2 seconds. Happens when cold, hot, etc. Also, when going up hills and down shifting from 4-3 or 5-4 there is a clunk/bang sometimes. Worse when under load. Fluid is changed fluid 3 times, level checked meticulously.

2015 1.6L with 128K miles.
 

·
Super Moderator
2014 Ford Escape Titanium, 2.0L, Sync 2 MFT
Joined
·
6,070 Posts
Anyone else ever get a delayed shift from 2-3? Sometimes last 2 seconds. Happens when cold, hot, etc. Also, when going up hills and down shifting from 4-3 or 5-4 there is a clunk/bang sometimes. Worse when under load. Fluid is changed fluid 3 times, level checked meticulously.

2015 1.6L with 128K miles.
I merged your thread with one of the existing threads on this topic. Have a look at some of the other posts for help. You can also search the forum to look at the other threads
 
121 - 128 of 128 Posts
Top