2013+ Ford Escape Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Stumbled on this issue looking for U-tube vids on how to drain radiator, on my 17 SE 2.0 AWD.

So searched and read these threads.


Have Ford 8 year, 125K warantee we bought (@ 77K now), so still 3.5 years left on that (and plenty of mileage, as
she is working from home, so maybe 10K a year these days). Obviously, am not touching anything before that,
but............

1. Has anyone taken a stab @ correlating the actual number of failures, vs the number of engines
(maybe someone who has filed one of these class action suites??).
2. Is there any value to a preemptive strike on doing a head gasket before failure.
Understand that won't help if block cracks, but I wasn't clear if head gasket failure was
only after a cracked block, or "early" gasket failure could happen, just due to the "unique"
sealing surface.

Or, is it just overhyped, and I should not worry about it.
 

·
Registered
Escape 2014 SE AWD 2.0L turbo with lots of options
Joined
·
145 Posts
Stumbled on this issue looking for U-tube vids on how to drain radiator, on my 17 SE 2.0 AWD.

So searched and read these threads.


Have Ford 8 year, 125K warantee we bought (@ 77K now), so still 3.5 years left on that (and plenty of mileage, as
she is working from home, so maybe 10K a year these days). Obviously, am not touching anything before that,
but............

1. Has anyone taken a stab @ correlating the actual number of failures, vs the number of engines
(maybe someone who has filed one of these class action suites??).
2. Is there any value to a preemptive strike on doing a head gasket before failure.
Understand that won't help if block cracks, but I wasn't clear if head gasket failure was
only after a cracked block, or "early" gasket failure could happen, just due to the "unique"
sealing surface.

Or, is it just overhyped, and I should not worry about it.
You might want to look at this thread and video too.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
537 Posts
It's pretty uncommon on the 2.0's. Much more of a 1.6/1.5 engine issue but it can happen. Personally I wouldn't worry about it while your still under warranty, and after 3.5 years reassess how much longer you actually plan on keeping the vehicle and what value it still has.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,196 Posts
Stumbled on this issue looking for U-tube vids on how to drain radiator, on my 17 SE 2.0 AWD.

So searched and read these threads.


Have Ford 8 year, 125K warantee we bought (@ 77K now), so still 3.5 years left on that (and plenty of mileage, as
she is working from home, so maybe 10K a year these days). Obviously, am not touching anything before that,
but............

1. Has anyone taken a stab @ correlating the actual number of failures, vs the number of engines
(maybe someone who has filed one of these class action suites??).
2. Is there any value to a preemptive strike on doing a head gasket before failure.
Understand that won't help if block cracks, but I wasn't clear if head gasket failure was
only after a cracked block, or "early" gasket failure could happen, just due to the "unique"
sealing surface.

Or, is it just overhyped, and I should not worry about it.
Have the same year and engine as yours but low miles....I changed to the yellow coolant 2 years ago..I change the oil twice a year with full syn. 6F-A type, SP...and dont beat on the engine....At 70 mph, doing only 2k rpms..The highest I ever hit was 3k rpms or less, only when climbing steep hills in my area..So my theory with this engine block is, baby this baby...and pray...🙏:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,147 Posts
Or, is it just overhyped, and I should not worry about it.
yes. you often only hear loudly about the failures. you don't hear from the 10s of millions of people who have no problems at all.

this ecoboost engine have been installed in multiple cars, 10s of millions of engines.

i dont see these vehicles littered on the side of the road, overflowing our junkyards.

I propose that it really isn't that big of a problem. it happens to an unfortunate few, but not something that you need to pre-emptively fix.


2.0 L "Twin-scroll" (2015–)
A redesigned 2.0 L EcoBoost four-cylinder was introduced with the second-generation Ford Edge, followed by the 2017 Ford Escape in spring 2016.[49] It features a higher compression ratio than its predecessor (10.1:1 vs 9.3:1) along with twin-scroll turbocharger and fuel and oil systems upgrades.[50] This new engine will deliver more low-end torque than its predecessor and all-wheel drive will be available in this configuration. It is also expected to tow 3,500 lb (1,600 kg) in the redesigned Edge and 2017 Escape.
Applications[edit]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You might want to look at this thread and video too.

Thanks, I had seen those vids early on, looking for rad. drain plug info. I re-watched that first vid, and it appears
the block in that vid is not cracked (yet). So possibly there is some merit in doing a head gasket before it leaks.

But none of the info I could find, even in the lawsuit articles, shows actual failure rate.
 

·
Registered
Escape 2014 SE AWD 2.0L turbo with lots of options
Joined
·
145 Posts
Thanks, I had seen those vids early on, looking for rad. drain plug info. I re-watched that first vid, and it appears
the block in that vid is not cracked (yet). So possibly there is some merit in doing a head gasket before it leaks.

But none of the info I could find, even in the lawsuit articles, shows actual failure rate.
I guess they don’t all break as I saw one yesterday on the road…

About replacing the gasket to alleviate the issue, one tech in a video I saw mentioned that it can’t really be prevented because the problem is not the gasket, it’s the head. However, if you were to constantly monitor your coolant levels, maybe changing the gasket could delay the engine from breaking. People on this forum and other sources I read had failures at different mileage, making the issue even harder to control.

My model 2014 is not affected by this specific problem but it had problems with front axles (I had to replace one already), rear control arms and transmission. I leased this car for my company and when the lease ended (and at the end of the lease), my company bought back the SUV. At the time, I was offered a new 2018 model. I’m happy I didn’t go for it. Then I closed my company and retired and bought back the car from my company.

I must admit that the transmission is worrying me as the dealer told me that a replacement could go between 6K to 8K CDN dollars. After talking with a friend, his step daughter, who has the exact the same model as mine, found a shop who installed a reman transmission for approximately 3K CDN dollars. All I can do to prevent the issue is to go easy on it and perform frequent drain and fills.

All these issues must not be very good for the popularity of the Escape. I like the driving and the handling of that SUV but I don’t feel like being in total confidence when using it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,196 Posts
Thanks, I had seen those vids early on, looking for rad. drain plug info. I re-watched that first vid, and it appears
the block in that vid is not cracked (yet). So possibly there is some merit in doing a head gasket before it leaks.

But none of the info I could find, even in the lawsuit articles, shows actual failure rate.
If I was you, just change the coolant to the Yellow..The drain plug is on the lower passanger side of the radiator, hidden in a tight spot, length wise on the radiator, not sticking out at a right angle, like most...Very tough to see and reach.....If Ford comes up with a revised head gasket that prevents the coolant intrusion, yes change it, otherwise don't see the benefit..Maybe they are working on that. Why is the class action taking so long on a settlement, besides an extended warranty???.....Cracked blocks must be very rare, probably by abusive driving..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
The head gasket issue on the 17-19 2.0 is a engine design problem. Replacing the headgasket will not solve the problem
Yeah, but is it the chicken or the egg that is the initial failure? As mentioned above, have seen one vid with leaking coolant, but block was not cracked (yet).
So with enough "liquid" to increase cyl pressure, but not hydro-lock the motor, does that then cause the cracked block? Seems like it could at least
be considered as a possibility (and does this happen right before you notice a decent loss of coolant?). It also matters on your time, tools, shop, and ability.
For me, a head gasket is a pretty simple job.

If I was you, just change the coolant to the Yellow..The drain plug is on the lower passanger side of the radiator, hidden in a tight spot, length wise on the radiator, not sticking out at a right angle, like most...Very tough to see and reach.....If Ford comes up with a revised head gasket that prevents the coolant intrusion, yes change it, otherwise don't see the benefit..Maybe they are working on that. Why is the class action taking so long on a settlement, besides an extended warranty???.....Cracked blocks must be very rare, probably by abusive driving..
Already done, as that is how this "job" all started. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Yeah, but is it the chicken or the egg that is the initial failure? As mentioned above, have seen one vid with leaking coolant, but block was not cracked (yet).
So with enough "liquid" to increase cyl pressure, but not hydro-lock the motor, does that then cause the cracked block? Seems like it could at least
be considered as a possibility (and does this happen right before you notice a decent loss of coolant?). It also matters on your time, tools, shop, and ability.
For me, a head gasket is a pretty simple job.



Already done, as that is how this "job" all started. :)
The actual failure, is due to slits that were manufactured into the engine block, between each cylinder to allow coolant passage. Due to the fact that the 17-19 is an “open deck” design (which means coolant flows continuously around each cyl) the coolant is able to get into the cyl due to the gasket not being able to properly handle the combustion pressure. Ford actually redesigned the block to include drilled holes between each cyl instead of the aforementioned slits.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,754 Posts
The actual failure, is due to slits that were manufactured into the engine block, between each cylinder to allow coolant passage. Due to the fact that the 17-19 is an “open deck” design (which means coolant flows continuously around each cyl) the coolant is able to get into the cyl due to the gasket not being able to properly handle the combustion pressure. Ford actually redesigned the block to include drilled holes between each cyl instead of the aforementioned slits.
Yep....it now appears that in many cases the block was not actually cracked but the head gasket failed due to the head design as mentioned.
Obviously Ford's solution was to replace the block or the whole engine rather than try and design a 'tougher' head gasket as the issue may reoccur anyway.
In some cases the slits in the block were closing due to heat and stopping the coolant cooling the block thus eventually causing cracks in some blocks.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top