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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all!

I recently changed the spark plugs on my 2020 escape 1.5L I3. I know the spark plugs can tell you a lot about the overall heath of your engine but I’m not 100% sure what to look for. Figured I’d post a picture of them here and see what you all think. These are factory spark plugs with 50K miles on them.



I still have them if closer pictures/different angles would be better.
 

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I learned a lot from Reader's Digest Complete Car Care Manual 40 years ago. Great book still today to learn about cars. Very inexpensive online and at library book sales.

Has a page of pictures on how to read spark plugs.
 

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Persian Green 2020 Escape Ti Hybrid
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Biggest thing is what the tip looks like and checking the gap with a flat feeler gauge.
The 100k change interval is based on best circumstances, the guys that monitor their plugs across the EB line over the years have found that realistic plug maintenance intervall is more along the line of 60-65K at which point they need to be cleaned/re-gapped or replaced.
 

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Plugs will go 100k miles. Changing them at 50k is a waste of money.
Incorrect, plug wear varies by engine, fuel and driving conditions.
They will go 100k under "normal" operating conditions, however if you look in the owner's manual under the definition of "severe" service you'd be surprised to find that most owners fall into that category.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Incorrect, plug wear varies by engine, fuel and driving conditions.
They will go 100k under "normal" operating conditions, however if you look in the owner's manual under the definition of "severe" service you'd be surprised to find that most owners fall into that category.
[/QUOTE

I’m sure the ones that one from the factory are pretty cheap 😂
 

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2021 Ford Escape SEL
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I myself switched as well in part to experiment with the NGK ruthenium plugs. It was noted by the service manager that the late model engines are very picky about what spark plug gets used. I am happy with the performance of these plugs as well.
 

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2022 Escape SE FWD 1.5L
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Thanks for your feedback everyone! FYI the main reason I changed them was due to poor idling and lower fuel economy then when I bought the car new. I put NGK Ruthenium plugs in and I’ve gained about 8MPG
You mean you gained about 8mpg from the day prior to the new plugs? What was your original mpg when you got the car and then 50k miles later and now with the new plugs? And are these real numbers with pencil/paper/arithmetic or wild guess estimate numbers from the dashboard?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I just reset my MPG on my dash every oil change. I was previously getting 29 and when I posted this I had about 150 miles on the new plugs and my average was 36. It’s seemed to average out to 35 now. Either way, noticeable difference.
 

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2014 Escape Titanium
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I myself switched as well in part to experiment with the NGK ruthenium plugs. It was noted by the service manager that the late model engines are very picky about what spark plug gets used. I am happy with the performance of these plugs as well.
That's for sure. In another care I have, if you don't replace the plugs with the OEM brand and a specific plug number you've got about a 75% chance it's going to run worse than whatever reason made you decide to change the plugs.
And be careful with newer plugs. More and more are coming pre-gapped so you don't have to use a feeler gauge to scrape off the plating on the electrodes that makes them 'special.'
 

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That's for sure. In another care I have, if you don't replace the plugs with the OEM brand and a specific plug number you've got about a 75% chance it's going to run worse than whatever reason made you decide to change the plugs.
And be careful with newer plugs. More and more are coming pre-gapped so you don't have to use a feeler gauge to scrape off the plating on the electrodes that makes them 'special.'
I am well aware. However the NGK Ruthenium plugs are quite stable. I drive hundreds of miles a week and if anything the engine is more stable. I am certain the service manager will take a close look at my vehicle to help asses this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I am well aware. However the NGK Ruthenium plugs are quite stable. I drive hundreds of miles a week and if anything the engine is more stable. I am certain the service manager will take a close look at my vehicle to help asses this.
I also feel that they just say that so you’ll pay them to do the work
 

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I am well aware. However the NGK Ruthenium plugs are quite stable. I drive hundreds of miles a week and if anything the engine is more stable. I am certain the service manager will take a close look at my vehicle to help asses this.
I've been an NGK user in my race cars. I'm not knocking their product. I'm just saying, this is the sign of the times for spark plugs.
 

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Thanks for your feedback everyone! FYI the main reason I changed them was due to poor idling and lower fuel economy then when I bought the car new. I put NGK Ruthenium plugs in and I’ve gained about 8MPG
Are you saying that you gained 8.0 mpg (not 0.8) just by changing plugs?
That's amazing!
Why isn't Ford using these plugs and more importantly why am I not using them!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Yea I gained 8. I think it may be slightly less now that I have put more miles on it. I can only afford 87 gas so I don’t think the effect would be as good if you use premium like you should 😂
 
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